Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJet Records
IN THE NEWS

Jet Records

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rock music is back in the courtroom--on death charges. Six weeks after the British rock group Judas Priest was absolved of causing the suicide-related deaths of two Sparks, Nev., youths, fellow British rocker Ozzy Osbourne faces similar charges in Macon, Ga.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 2, 2011 | Bloomberg News
NetJets Inc., the business jet operator owned by Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Inc., said it placed a record order for as many as 120 Bombardier Inc. planes in anticipation of a rebound in luxury travel. The agreement, worth more than $6.7 billion at list prices, comprises 50 firm orders and 70 options, NetJets said Wednesday. Bombardier said it's the largest business aircraft sale in the company's history. How much Columbus, Ohio-based NetJets will pay for the aircraft, which will be delivered starting in the fourth quarter of 2012, wasn't disclosed.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 5, 1999 | Associated Press
The cockpit voice recorder from Payne Stewart's shattered Learjet has yielded noises but no voices from the final moments of the doomed flight. But those noises could help establish the cause of the accident that killed the golfer and five other people Oct. 25, National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Paul Schlamm said Thursday. The plane crashed in South Dakota four hours after it left Orlando, Fla., on a flight to Texas.
WORLD
July 6, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A submarine scouring the Indian Ocean detected the signal beacons of the data and voice recorders from a Yemenia Airways flight that crashed off the Comoros Islands, the French aviation agency said. Plans were underway to retrieve the boxes within days, a Yemeni official said. The chief of Yemen's Civil Aviation Authority, Hamed Ahmad Faraj, had only grim news for reporters, saying that search planes have spotted another floating body.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
The recording tape was missing from one of the two "black boxes" Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin handed over in hopes of clearing up why a South Korean jetliner was shot down over Soviet territory in 1983, a South Korean official said Saturday. Chang Sang Hyon, vice minister of transportation, said the flight-data recorder did not contain its tape, which is believed to be key to determining why Korean Air Lines Flight 007 veered off course, violating Soviet airspace.
NEWS
June 28, 1985 | Associated Press
A faint signal has been detected from the seabed that could be from the flight recorders of the Air-India jumbo jet that crashed in the North Atlantic with the loss of 329 lives, investigators said Thursday. The Challenger, a British seabed survey ship, "has intercepted a weak and intermittent signal, but we can't confirm that it is from the flight recorders," said a spokesman at the Royal Navy's command center at Northwood, northwest of London.
NEWS
June 26, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Experts said Tuesday that they have not yet determined if it was a bomb that shattered an Air-India jumbo jet at 31,000 feet and that the "black box" data recorders from Flight 182, which could provide clues to the disaster, may never be found. The search in the North Atlantic for victims of the Sunday crash was scaled down, with 198 of the 329 people aboard still unaccounted for.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
Millionaire adventurer Steve Fossett raced across the skies above Pakistan on Tuesday in his bid to become the first person to fly a plane around the globe solo, nonstop and without refueling. His experimental single- engine GlobalFlyer had consumed 25% of its 18,000 pounds of fuel, while Fossett had downed at least three diet chocolate milkshakes, he said in a call from the plane. He took off after sunset Monday from Salina.
NEWS
February 10, 1989
Search teams, slogging through knee-deep mud, recovered at least 30 more bodies as well as the cockpit voice recorder from the wreckage of a U.S.-owned Boeing 707 that crashed in the Azores Islands, killing all 137 passengers and seven crew members aboard. Search efforts to recover the remaining bodies as well as the flight data recorder were later suspended due to fog. "The (landing) instructions given the pilot were absolutely correct," an airport official on Santa Maria Island said.
NEWS
February 3, 2000 | ERIC MALNIC TINA DIRMANN and MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An underwater Navy robot, operating by remote control 700 feet beneath the surface of the Pacific Ocean, retrieved a cockpit voice recorder late Wednesday that should contain clues to the crash of an Alaska Airlines jet off the Ventura County coast. Earlier in the day, the Coast Guard called off its search for survivors, saying there was no chance any of the 88 people aboard Flight 261 could have lived.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2005 | From Associated Press
Millionaire adventurer Steve Fossett raced across the skies above Pakistan on Tuesday in his bid to become the first person to fly a plane around the globe solo, nonstop and without refueling. His experimental single- engine GlobalFlyer had consumed 25% of its 18,000 pounds of fuel, while Fossett had downed at least three diet chocolate milkshakes, he said in a call from the plane. He took off after sunset Monday from Salina.
NEWS
February 3, 2000 | ERIC MALNIC TINA DIRMANN and MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An underwater Navy robot, operating by remote control 700 feet beneath the surface of the Pacific Ocean, retrieved a cockpit voice recorder late Wednesday that should contain clues to the crash of an Alaska Airlines jet off the Ventura County coast. Earlier in the day, the Coast Guard called off its search for survivors, saying there was no chance any of the 88 people aboard Flight 261 could have lived.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
The cockpit voice recorder recovered from the crash of golfer Payne Stewart's jet contains no voices, but federal investigators said Tuesday that alarms, including one signaling cabin pressure problems, sounded before the Learjet went nose down in a South Dakota cow pasture.
NEWS
November 5, 1999 | Associated Press
The cockpit voice recorder from Payne Stewart's shattered Learjet has yielded noises but no voices from the final moments of the doomed flight. But those noises could help establish the cause of the accident that killed the golfer and five other people Oct. 25, National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Paul Schlamm said Thursday. The plane crashed in South Dakota four hours after it left Orlando, Fla., on a flight to Texas.
NEWS
May 27, 1996 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fifteen days after ValuJet Flight 592 plummeted into the Everglades, killing all 110 people aboard, federal investigators Sunday finally recovered the cockpit voice recorder that may offer decisive clues as to the cause of the crash. Packed in a beverage cooler and immersed in the same water in which it has been hidden since the tragedy on May 11, the second of two so-called black boxes was flown to Washington, D.C., for analysis at the headquarters of the National Transportation Safety Board.
NEWS
December 23, 1995 | LEILA COBO and STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Desperate relatives Friday continued the search for passengers on a plane from Miami that crashed on its approach to the Cali airport in southwestern Colombia. Inspired by reports that a local resident, Dr. Juan Carlos Reyes, had helped rescuers save his 19-year-old brother, Mauricio, after all 164 of those aboard the American Airlines flight were believed dead, brothers, sisters and parents kept searching, even after official rescue efforts were suspended late Thursday because of fog and cold.
NEWS
November 24, 1999 | From Associated Press
The cockpit voice recorder recovered from the crash of golfer Payne Stewart's jet contains no voices, but federal investigators said Tuesday that alarms, including one signaling cabin pressure problems, sounded before the Learjet went nose down in a South Dakota cow pasture.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2011 | Bloomberg News
NetJets Inc., the business jet operator owned by Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway Inc., said it placed a record order for as many as 120 Bombardier Inc. planes in anticipation of a rebound in luxury travel. The agreement, worth more than $6.7 billion at list prices, comprises 50 firm orders and 70 options, NetJets said Wednesday. Bombardier said it's the largest business aircraft sale in the company's history. How much Columbus, Ohio-based NetJets will pay for the aircraft, which will be delivered starting in the fourth quarter of 2012, wasn't disclosed.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
The recording tape was missing from one of the two "black boxes" Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin handed over in hopes of clearing up why a South Korean jetliner was shot down over Soviet territory in 1983, a South Korean official said Saturday. Chang Sang Hyon, vice minister of transportation, said the flight-data recorder did not contain its tape, which is believed to be key to determining why Korean Air Lines Flight 007 veered off course, violating Soviet airspace.
NEWS
October 8, 1992
Investigators found the charred and dented flight data recorder of the El Al Boeing 747 that slammed into a suburban Amsterdam apartment block on Sunday. The briefcase-sized recorder could provide clues to why the jet crashed. About 40 corpses had been removed from the smoldering rubble, but 250 people were still unaccounted for. The missing were presumed dead.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|