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April 19, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The jet stream -- America's stormy-weather maker -- is creeping north and weakening, new research shows. That potentially means less rain in the already dry South and Southwest and more storms in the North. And it could also translate into more and stronger hurricanes. From 1979 to 2001, the Northern Hemisphere's jet stream moved north on average at a rate of about 1.25 miles a year, according to the paper published Friday in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. The authors suspect global warming is the cause.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Hector Becerra and Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
A "May miracle" of almost perfectly timed, above-average rainfall helped firefighters battling the large Springs fire in Ventura County and guaranteed that Los Angeles would not break a dubious record. The city was on track to having its fourth-driest year since 1877. But with about 0.70 inches of rain falling in downtown L.A. just before noon, that is no longer the case. For firefighters trying to mop up the 28,000-acre wildfire that broke out last week under blistering temperatures, the rain couldn't have come at a better time - even if Southern California's fire season still looks to be an ominous one. PHOTOS: Springs fire Tom Piranio, a spokesman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, said it didn't rain enough in the actual perimeter of the blaze for people to need an umbrella, but it was more than enough to help firefighters slow the Springs fire's momentum.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2005 | Hector Becerra and Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writers
More rain has fallen in Los Angeles over the last three months -- 15.68 inches -- than normally falls in an entire year, making this the wettest start to a rainy season since 1966. Now, forecasters expect a storm coming from the north and drawing moisture from warmer southern waters to dump up to 15 inches of rain in the mountains and up to 5 inches in Los Angeles beginning today and continuing through the weekend.
SCIENCE
March 26, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Anyone forced to shovel their car out of a snowbank this winter might wonder just how it is a blizzard can occur in a warming climate. The answer, climate scientists say, may have to do with record sea ice losses in the Arctic. At a Tuesday news conference, several researchers said that warming conditions in the Arctic may be weakening jet stream currents and causing extreme weather systems to linger in northern mid-latitudes. "Ironically ... as the ice pack retreats and the Arctic heats up, there's a counteracting tendency in middle latitudes for colder winters, as well as hotter summers," said Stephen Vavrus, senior scientist at the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin.
SPORTS
October 12, 1996 | ROBYN NORWOOD
Teemu Selanne would probably live in Arizona now if not for the events of last Feb. 7, when he was traded from the Winnipeg Jets to the Mighty Ducks. Fans in Phoenix probably don't realize what they lost, but Selanne arrived Friday morning leading the NHL in scoring after four games, with 10 points on four goals and six assists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2001 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first of two wintry Pacific storms swept into Southern California late Friday, bringing the likelihood of substantial rain and snow that should last, off and on, through Wednesday. Forecasters said the two storms could drop more than 2 inches of rain in the area, with about twice that much in foothill communities, before things start drying out Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1996 | ED BOND
The San Fernando Valley should be enjoying a gradual warming trend now that the jet stream that brought the region a blast of frigid polar air has shifted back to the north. "This one won't be a cold one like we experienced last week," said Stuart Seto, a spokesman for the National Weather Service in Oxnard. Light showers are expected for today and should end Tuesday, Seto said. Skies should be partly cloudy Wednesday and then clearing with high temperatures in the mid-70s on Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2001 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The second storm in less than a week is expected to bring rain to Southern California this afternoon, and a third storm should bring more by Monday. Today's fast-moving storm is expected to be a lot like the one that dropped about three-quarters of an inch of rain on Los Angeles last weekend, most of it within a few hours.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1990
A low-pressure front that visited San Diego with clouds and cool temperatures last weekend is back this weekend, according to the National Weather Service in San Diego. The front, created Sept. 19 by cold air coming in from Canada, headed up the coast during the week, sprinkling rain on San Francisco and other parts of Northern California, forecaster Wilbur Shigehara said. A strong jet stream over Canada is now deflecting the front back toward San Diego, Shigehara said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1999
The winter warming of the Northern hemisphere in recent years is ultimately caused by global warming, but the more proximate cause is change in the jet stream, NASA researchers report in today's issue of the journal Nature. Although mean global temperatures have risen by less than 1 degree Fahrenheit since the 19th century, winter temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere have climbed by as much as 9 degrees in the last 35 years.
SCIENCE
January 28, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Heat generated by the Earth's major cities has influenced global weather patterns and is probably responsible for winter warming in parts of North America and northern Asia, according to scientists. So-called waste heat produced by human activities in major urban centers has altered aspects of the jet stream and other atmospheric systems, causing significant warming in some regions and cooling in others, according to a study published recently in Nature Climate Change. "What we found is that energy use from multiple urban areas collectively can warm the atmosphere remotely, thousands of miles away from the energy consumption regions," said lead author Guang Zhang, a research meteorologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla.
SCIENCE
June 26, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
The North American jet stream that flows from west to east across the continent is a major contributor to weather, bringing cold air down from the north or sealing off southern regions from winter temperatures. It also provides an assist to eastbound aircraft. This jet stream and others on the Earth's surface are driven by atmospheric heating by the sun, and astronomers had assumed that similar jet streams on Saturn had the same origin. But new data compiled from imaging by NASA's Cassini probe, which has been orbiting the planet since July 1, 2004, show that Jupiter's jet streams have a different power source -- the planet's own internal heat.
OPINION
April 22, 2012 | By John M. Wallace
This year's late winter heat wave over much of the United States, dubbed "March Madness," has been cited as evidence that human-induced global warming is causing the climate system to stray far outside its normal range of variability. The thousands of all-time high temperature records shattered during last month's climate rampage have been likened to home-run records shattered by a baseball player on steroids. It is true that the signature of human-induced global warming is clearly apparent in the increasing number of new high temperature records, which are currently outnumbering low temperature records by a factor of about 3 to 1. Just as a rising tide lifts all ships, a rise in global mean temperature is bound to raise the levels of the highest temperatures.
SPORTS
August 26, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
All signs say that the Angels are toast. Sweep out the stadium and turn off the lights. People with tickets for upcoming games should bring beach balls and start the wave, because that's about the most fun they'll have at the Big A the rest of the way. These aren't baseball games. They are parades of men in red uniforms, walking to the plate and, a minute or so later, walking back. Our headline writers captured it perfectly this week: "Angels Bats Rest Again. " And: "Hits Keep On Not Coming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2010 | By Hector Becerra and Ruben Vives
Standing in front of her mudslide-damaged home in La Cañada Flintridge on a wet Saturday afternoon, Karineh Mangassarian said she hoped the rain would give it a rest. "At least for a month, then it can rain again," she said. "I just want the storms to ease up." Better luck next year. As residents worried once again about sliding foothills and Los Angeles was again bedeviled by the kind of bumper-car accidents that happen whenever it rains, there's good news for water managers and people who generally like stormy weather.
SPORTS
November 18, 2009 | SAM FARMER, ON THE NFL
Philip Rivers was dead wrong. And he has to be happy about that. When his team lost to Denver last month, Rivers said the Broncos "aren't going to fall apart" like last season's version. Now, after three consecutive Denver losses, indications point to the contrary. The Chargers, who fell behind in the AFC West by 3 1/2 games with that defeat, have already caught up and can claim sole possession of the division lead with a victory at Denver on Sunday. San Diego has won four in a row, and its next two opponents after Denver are a combined 2-15: Kansas City and Cleveland.
NEWS
March 21, 1986 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II and RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writers
The temperature neared 90 degrees in the Los Angeles area Thursday, the last day of winter, but no records were broken. The forecast called for continued fair and slightly cooler weather through Monday. For the weekend, temperatures at the beaches will range from 68 to 72, and inland from 75 to 83. The skies will be generally clear, with low morning and evening clouds.
SCIENCE
January 31, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Monitoring earthquakes underneath the 10,200-foot Redoubt Volcano about 100 miles southwest of Anchorage, scientists from the Alaska Volcano Observatory warned this week that an eruption was imminent, sending experienced Alaskans shopping for protection against a dusty shower of volcanic ash. The state's volcanoes typically shoot ash 30,000 to 50,000 feet high -- more than 9 miles -- into the jet stream.
SCIENCE
April 19, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The jet stream -- America's stormy-weather maker -- is creeping north and weakening, new research shows. That potentially means less rain in the already dry South and Southwest and more storms in the North. And it could also translate into more and stronger hurricanes. From 1979 to 2001, the Northern Hemisphere's jet stream moved north on average at a rate of about 1.25 miles a year, according to the paper published Friday in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. The authors suspect global warming is the cause.
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