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Jetcruzer Airplane

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BUSINESS
July 27, 1998 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS
Jet Plant Taking Off: Long Beach-based Advanced Aerodynamics & Structures Inc., also known as AASI Aircraft, has begun construction on a $7.5-million plant, where the company plans to assemble its Jetcruzer-500 business jet. The company, which raised $32 million in an initial public stock offering 18 months ago, has orders worth about $152 million for 127 of its single-engine planes, according to Gene Comfort, AASI executive vice president.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 1998 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS
Jet Plant Taking Off: Long Beach-based Advanced Aerodynamics & Structures Inc., also known as AASI Aircraft, has begun construction on a $7.5-million plant, where the company plans to assemble its Jetcruzer-500 business jet. The company, which raised $32 million in an initial public stock offering 18 months ago, has orders worth about $152 million for 127 of its single-engine planes, according to Gene Comfort, AASI executive vice president.
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BUSINESS
October 13, 1992 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With money from a Taiwanese industrialist and the skills of former Lockheed workers, a fledgling company in North Hollywood is trying to accomplish what very few have in many years: successfully bring a new small aircraft to the market. After two years of development, Advanced Aerodynamics & Structures Inc. last month sent a prototype of its single-engine turboprop--called Jetcruzer--on its maiden flight. The six-passenger plane was then shipped to the National Business Aircraft Assn.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1992 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With money from a Taiwanese industrialist and the skills of former Lockheed workers, a fledgling company in North Hollywood is trying to accomplish what very few have in many years: successfully bring a new small aircraft to the market. After two years of development, Advanced Aerodynamics & Structures Inc. last month sent a prototype of its single-engine turboprop--called Jetcruzer--on its maiden flight. The six-passenger plane was then shipped to the National Business Aircraft Assn.
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