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Jethro Tull

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December 7, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Just when it was getting so you could almost admit to liking Jethro Tull without having to turn in your Cool Club card, the veteran British progressive rock band had to go and win the inappropriate heavy-metal/hard-rock Grammy this year and become the target for a whole new generation's derision. Well, that wasn't Tull's fault--leader Ian Anderson even joked about it Tuesday during the first of the band's two nights at the Universal Amphitheatre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Few songwriters in British rock have had loftier goals, and more success, than Pete Townshend of the Who, and few works from the classic rock era are as accomplished and emotionally rich as "Quadrophenia," the Who's 1973 double-album rock opera focused on rebel youth in working class England. Townshend and longtime bandmate Roger Daltrey celebrated the four decades since its release in a concert at Staples Center on Wednesday night, presenting to a capacity crowd the melodically and thematically linked 80-minute work as it was originally sequenced -- as one big story to be appreciated as a whole.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1995 | CHRIS RIEMENSCHNEIDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Think it's strange that veteran rocker Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull has made an album of instrumental music for flute and orchestra? Well, so did Anderson when someone at EMI's classical division suggested the idea. In fact, he thought it sounded a bit "Spinal Tap-ish." His initial response: "No way." "It was one of those things where someone asks you to do something and you just say, 'No, I can't do that,' " says Anderson, 48.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2011
A list of upcoming concerts across the Southland, with on-sale dates in parentheses. Verizon Wireless Amphitheater System of a Down, May 25 (Sat.) Gibson Amphitheatre Def Leppard, Sept. 7 (Fri.); Hot 92 Freestyle Explosion with Expose and more, June 11 (Sat.) Hollywood Palladium Above & Beyond, May 14 (Mon.) Greek Theatre Jason Bonham's Led Zeppelin Experience, May 27; War, May 28; Jethro Tull, June 11; Youssou N'Dour/Angélique Kidjo/Vusi Mahlasela, June 16 (Fri.)
NEWS
August 26, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL
Jethro Tull's sophomore effort found the group in a transitional stage. The band was still steeped in the jazz influence that made its "This Was" one of the more auspicious debut albums of the late '60s, and now the band was beginning to assimilate classical, ethnic, Euro-folk and metal sounds into the mix. This early eclectic experimentation added up to crisp, smart rock 'n' roll that still sounds vital and inspired a quarter of a century later.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1989 | ROGER CATLIN, HARTFORD COURANT
Ian Anderson likes the fact that his group, Jethro Tull, now plays before mostly familiar faces. "After all this time, it's reassuring that there are people there who want to see us--and they are there to see us," Anderson said over the phone from his home in Great Britain during a break between the European and American Jethro Tull tours. "It's not as perhaps was the case in '73 or '74, when the audience was comprised in considerable part of the idly curious."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1991 | JEAN ROSENBLUTH
It's tempting to dredge up the old Jethro Tull title "Too Old to Rock 'n' Roll, Too Young to Die" to explain the mediocrity of the group's performance on Saturday at the Universal Amphitheatre. But that would be too easy. After all, Neil Young has a couple of years on Tull's Ian Anderson, and he continues to make provocative, unadulterated rock. The real explanation for the irrelevance and tediousness of the Universal show goes beyond a few gray hairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1988 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
There are a lot of ways a rock band could celebrate its 20th anniversary on stage, especially if that group has heard cries of "dinosaur," and "over the hill"--not to mention "pretentious" and "overblown"--during many of those years. Wisely, Jethro Tull chose the light, self-mocking approach Friday at Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre. Opening with "Cross-Eyed Mary," leader Ian Anderson played the first flute parts while being pushed on stage in a wheelchair.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1987 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
Say what you will about Jethro Tull, but Ian Anderson is still rock's best bug-eyed rock singer who stands on one leg when playing the flute. OK, he pretty much has the field to himself. But Tull's show Monday at the Universal Amphitheatre demonstrated that there's surprising spunk left in the band--and in the man.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1998 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The past has always been good to Jethro Tull. Even back in the progressive rock days of the 1970s, the band's heavy blend of rock, blues, jazz, classical and Celtic flavors made it a peculiar anachronism, more old England than classic rock. Both timeless and hopelessly dated, challenging and pretentious, Jethro Tull has spent three decades in a strange musical dialogue with the ancients.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2009
With regard to the nominees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ["KISS Makes Rock List; Sting Doesn't," by Randy Lewis, Sept. 24], I am constantly disappointed by the omission of five words from any Rock Hall ballot, and I know I'm not alone: Paul Revere and the Raiders. Nick Vincent Studio City -- Never mind that Sting isn't getting in next year. I'm sick and tired of [them] continually ignoring the progressive rock movement of the '70s. Don't tell me bands such as Jethro Tull, Yes and ELP don't belong in there.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1999
* Billy Corgan, others, "Stigmata" soundtrack, Virgin * Holger Czukay, "Good Morning Story," Tone Casualties * Dance Hall Crashers, "Purr," Pink & Black * Filter, "Title of Record," Reprise * Jethro Tull, "J-Tull Dot Com," Fuel 2000 * Puff Daddy, "Forever," Bad Boy/Arista * Richard Thompson, "Mock Tudor," Capitol * Clay Walker, "Live, Laugh, Love," Giant Nashville
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1998
I can't understand why Steve Appleford takes a negative position against Jethro Tull ("Living in the Past" review of Aug. 29); a band that has endured over 30 years. I can count on one hand how many bands that have lasted that long. My wife and I attended the concert on Aug. 29, and yes, we're part of the 500-plus crowd that was over 40. Reading Appleford's story, I'm wondering at what point will we not be let into a concert due to our age. I found that the members of Jethro Tull had aged, and yes, Ian Anderson had lost some hair but still could produce a high-energy, quality concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1998 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The past has always been good to Jethro Tull. Even back in the progressive rock days of the 1970s, the band's heavy blend of rock, blues, jazz, classical and Celtic flavors made it a peculiar anachronism, more old England than classic rock. Both timeless and hopelessly dated, challenging and pretentious, Jethro Tull has spent three decades in a strange musical dialogue with the ancients.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
Turn back the clock 25 years and the Brit-rock double bill Saturday night at Irvine Meadows would have been an Event. In 1971, Jethro Tull was staking a claim as a great band, able to weave blues, folk and jazz influences together with an unerring knack for the irresistible rock riff. Leader Ian Anderson was a top-notch showman with a flair for comedy and dramatics and his flute-playing was a distinctive calling card that enhanced Tull's dynamic song arrangements.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1996 | JOHN ROOS
It's easy to see how the flamboyant Ian Anderson can overshadow his band mates in Jethro Tull. When not singing, leaping about while playing the flute or darting back and forth across the stage, Tull's charismatic front man often chats it up with members of the band's adoring crowd. Martin Barre, Tull's guitarist for 28 years, knows better than to even attempt to compete. He's perfectly content with his role in the group.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
Turn back the clock 25 years and the Brit-rock double bill Saturday night at Irvine Meadows would have been an Event. In 1971, Jethro Tull was staking a claim as a great band, able to weave blues, folk and jazz influences together with an unerring knack for the irresistible rock riff. Leader Ian Anderson was a top-notch showman with a flair for comedy and dramatics and his flute-playing was a distinctive calling card that enhanced Tull's dynamic song arrangements.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1999
* Billy Corgan, others, "Stigmata" soundtrack, Virgin * Holger Czukay, "Good Morning Story," Tone Casualties * Dance Hall Crashers, "Purr," Pink & Black * Filter, "Title of Record," Reprise * Jethro Tull, "J-Tull Dot Com," Fuel 2000 * Puff Daddy, "Forever," Bad Boy/Arista * Richard Thompson, "Mock Tudor," Capitol * Clay Walker, "Live, Laugh, Love," Giant Nashville
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM
Adding another cook hasn't spoiled the broth for Big Enjoyers. The Costa Mesa band--actually a partnership of studio denizens who seldom play live--upheld its name as a duo on the savory 1993 debut album, "Gronkin' Quiver." For "Buterite," which furthers a tradition of inscrutable album titles, former Trouble Dolls bassist Mark Soden joins the original twosome, multi-instrumentalists Jeff Bostock and Tom Neas.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1995 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI
After 26 years fronting Jethro Tull, Ian Anderson doesn't really need a second act to his career. But Tull's wild-eyed flutist presented some impressive new stretches Wednesday at the Pantages Theater, leading a four-man "pocket orchestra" in a set of his recent neo-classical compositions, plus a set of refurbished Tull rarities.
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