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Jewelry District

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1993
I am compelled to correct a misperception that was created as a result of several statements attributed to me in Timothy Williams' article, "A Case With Many Facets" (Sept. 29). Regrettably, the article has reinforced an undeserved image regarding the merchants in the Los Angeles jewelry district. Further, the observations I made to Williams, when viewed out of context, serve only to fuel the perception that the downtown jewelry industry is replete with corruption. As with any segment of society, there is and likely always will be an unprincipled element who will prey upon the unsuspecting.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2013 | By Frank Shyong, Los Angeles Times
Around the corner from the bustle and roar of Broadway's Jewelry District in downtown L.A., a quiet alley serves as a respite for locals and tourists. Shops and restaurants with colorful awnings and peeling brick facades present a kitschy, Old World scene, complete with a potbellied chef statue, and a Marilyn Monroe perched in a pink Cadillac. On most days, a group of Armenian men can be spotted hunched over a backgammon board, shrouded in cigarette smoke. But the fate of St. Vincent's Court - a California historical landmark - has been thrown into question after a complaint prompted a city crackdown on outdoor seating.
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BUSINESS
December 23, 2009 | David Lazarus
I knew things would be bad even before I set out this week to see how jewelry stores were faring this holiday season. I knew owners of these small businesses were facing a triple whammy: the crappy economy, sky-high gold prices and a product that's a luxury and by no means a necessity. I expected to hear more than a few tales of woe. But I wasn't ready for the complete devastation I came across. "It's almost Christmas," said Joel Taban, owner of Oro Shop in the heart of the jewelry district in downtown Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2012 | By William D'Urso, Los Angeles Time
State officials have filed a lawsuit against 16 downtown Los Angeles jewelry stores and distributors, accusing them of selling items with toxic levels of lead. Capping a three-year investigation, the state Department of Toxic Substances Control said at a news conference Tuesday that it had seized 306 pieces of jewelry that were found to be tainted with high levels of lead and cadmium. The jewelry seized was mainly inexpensive adult and children's jewelry, said Brian Johnson, the department's deputy director of enforcement.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2000 | Lee Romney
Tens of millions of dollars change hands daily in downtown L.A.'s jewelry district, but ask your average Angeleno where to go to buy gold and precious stones and you'll likely get a nervous stare. The district, with its maze of retail outlets and reclusive high-security manufacturers, is a word-of-mouth kind of place. Now, a young Armenian entrepreneur has launched a Web site that aims to make shopping there easier and less intimidating. So far, LAJewelryDistrict.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1990
A federal court jury on Monday acquitted two sisters of conspiracy and money-laundering charges in a case involving "Operation Polar Cap," a massive drug and currency investigation focused in the jewelry district in downtown Los Angeles. The jurors found Joyce Momjdian, 25, and Zepur Moroyan, 22, both of La Crescenta, not guilty of 26 charges against them in a 1989 indictment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2002 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials Wednesday unveiled a plan to clean up environmental and fire hazards in downtown's jewelry district, but acknowledged that the plan mostly restates or weakens current laws. City officials--under pressure to sustain the economic life of the jewelry district--presented the guidelines at a private meeting of jewelry manufacturers, telling them that the rules were relaxed to help them stay in business. Enforcing the "existing law would be much more stringent than the guidelines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1995
The Jewelry Building Owner's Assn. of Greater Los Angeles kicked off a new patrolling program Friday in the Downtown jewelry district, combining the forces of police and armed security officers. The private security force, which includes two on full-time bicycle duty, will patrol Hill Street between 5th and 7th streets, said Tom Gilmore, property manager of the International Jewelry Center. The LAPD's Central Division will add two patrol officers, Gilmore said.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the multimillion-dollar jewelry district of downtown Los Angeles, security precautions can range from armed guards and video cameras to alarms, sensitive electronic entry and exit ways and even bullet-proof glass partitions or security waiting rooms.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1999 | MARLA DICKERSON and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Digital diamonds? Internet earrings? The newest company to set up shop in L.A.'s jewelry district is betting that online jewelry shopping is going to be the next big thing in e-commerce. Vancouver, Canada-based Denmans.com has established a fulfillment office in the International Jewelry Center in preparation for the November launch of its Internet store (http://www.denmans.com). So why would anyone make an expensive and emotional purchase such as a wedding ring over the Internet?
BUSINESS
December 23, 2009 | David Lazarus
I knew things would be bad even before I set out this week to see how jewelry stores were faring this holiday season. I knew owners of these small businesses were facing a triple whammy: the crappy economy, sky-high gold prices and a product that's a luxury and by no means a necessity. I expected to hear more than a few tales of woe. But I wasn't ready for the complete devastation I came across. "It's almost Christmas," said Joel Taban, owner of Oro Shop in the heart of the jewelry district in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2009 | By Victoria Kim
The head of an Orthodox Jewish sect was sentenced to two years in prison Monday for a tax evasion and money-laundering scheme that continued over a decade, spanned two continents, and cost taxpayers millions of dollars in lost revenue, authorities said. Naftali Tzi Weisz, 61, the Brooklyn, N.Y.-based grand rabbi of the Spinka sect, pleaded guilty to conspiracy in August for his part in a scheme in which people made tax-exempt donations to charitable organizations and were later reimbursed for up to 95% of their contributions.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2008 | Leslie Earnest
BIG BOX Costco, Wal-Mart, Sam's Club ... The prices are good. (That doesn't mean cheap. Recently a Costco store in Orange County advertised a 3.12-carat diamond for $73,199.99. Who knows what it would have cost at Cartier?) It's all about volume, whether you're interested in tires or silver bangles. "Wal-Mart, as we all know, drives incredible bargains through their vendor base," says Debra Stevenson, president of Skyline Studios, an L.A. consulting firm, and so do its rivals.
MAGAZINE
February 11, 2007 | Jessica Gelt
The sooner you and Toto realize that you're not in Kay Jewelers anymore, the better. L.A.'s Jewelry District is the second largest in the nation, behind (of course) New York City's. A diamond in the rough, it's mounted between the four prongs of Broadway, Olive and 5th and 8th streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2006 | Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writer
The way Harry Yildiz tells it, he was alone in his downtown jewelry shop when a man in a raincoat with a gun hidden beneath his umbrella burst in, tied him up and made off with $1.1 million in diamonds and jewels. But underwriters at Lloyd's of London say it went down differently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2002 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials Wednesday unveiled a plan to clean up environmental and fire hazards in downtown's jewelry district, but acknowledged that the plan mostly restates or weakens current laws. City officials--under pressure to sustain the economic life of the jewelry district--presented the guidelines at a private meeting of jewelry manufacturers, telling them that the rules were relaxed to help them stay in business. Enforcing the "existing law would be much more stringent than the guidelines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court jury Monday acquitted two sisters of conspiracy and money-laundering charges in a case involving "Operation Polar Cap," a massive drug and currency investigation focused in Los Angeles' downtown jewelry district. The jurors found Joyce Momjdian, 25, and Zepur Moroyan, 22, both of La Crescenta, not guilty of 26 charges lodged against them in a 1989 indictment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2001 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In downtown Los Angeles' bustling jewelry district, six blocks from City Hall, a team of fire inspectors this year found the makings of a potential toxic disaster: more than a ton of cyanide powder in one building, with 1,700 pounds of the poison in the basement alone. Cyanide, widely used by downtown manufacturers to strip gold jewelry, can be vaporized into a lethal gas--a risk so deadly that the legal limit for an entire building is 10 pounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Saturdays, much of downtown Los Angeles moves with a sad kind of slowness. The skyscrapers are closed, the workers gone for the weekend. Few come to shop. Few come, as they do in other cities, to stroll the streets. But tucked away in the heart of downtown is the jewelry district, a bustling shopping area that even in a time of uncertainty provides a glimpse of the possibilities that some insist exist here.
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