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Jewelry Industry

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BUSINESS
February 10, 1994 | VIVIAN MARINO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The sparkle has returned to the jewelry industry after years of, well, lusterless sales. An improved economy, repeal of the luxury tax and new marketing options, such as home-shopping television, are behind the turnaround, which began a year ago. "I think the confidence in wearing jewelry is coming back," said Simon Teakle, who heads the U.S. jewelry division of Christie's auction house, where 1993 sales rose 25% over the previous year.
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BUSINESS
September 16, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Some people wait years before their creative talents are recognized. Robert Keith waited less than 24 hours. It was 2005 and Keith, a fashion photographer looking for a new challenge, had just made his first piece of fine jewelry: a gold ring that looked like a miniature version of a ship's anchor chain. "I was so proud of it, I put it on my finger and I went down the street the next day to a Starbucks," Keith said, "and a lady tapped me on the shoulder and said, 'Excuse me, where did you get that ring?
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BUSINESS
September 16, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Some people wait years before their creative talents are recognized. Robert Keith waited less than 24 hours. It was 2005 and Keith, a fashion photographer looking for a new challenge, had just made his first piece of fine jewelry: a gold ring that looked like a miniature version of a ship's anchor chain. "I was so proud of it, I put it on my finger and I went down the street the next day to a Starbucks," Keith said, "and a lady tapped me on the shoulder and said, 'Excuse me, where did you get that ring?
BUSINESS
July 17, 2012 | By William D'Urso, Los Angeles Time
State officials have filed a lawsuit against 16 downtown Los Angeles jewelry stores and distributors, accusing them of selling items with toxic levels of lead. Capping a three-year investigation, the state Department of Toxic Substances Control said at a news conference Tuesday that it had seized 306 pieces of jewelry that were found to be tainted with high levels of lead and cadmium. The jewelry seized was mainly inexpensive adult and children's jewelry, said Brian Johnson, the department's deputy director of enforcement.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2012 | By William D'Urso, Los Angeles Time
State officials have filed a lawsuit against 16 downtown Los Angeles jewelry stores and distributors, accusing them of selling items with toxic levels of lead. Capping a three-year investigation, the state Department of Toxic Substances Control said at a news conference Tuesday that it had seized 306 pieces of jewelry that were found to be tainted with high levels of lead and cadmium. The jewelry seized was mainly inexpensive adult and children's jewelry, said Brian Johnson, the department's deputy director of enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1993
I am compelled to correct a misperception that was created as a result of several statements attributed to me in Timothy Williams' article, "A Case With Many Facets" (Sept. 29). Regrettably, the article has reinforced an undeserved image regarding the merchants in the Los Angeles jewelry district. Further, the observations I made to Williams, when viewed out of context, serve only to fuel the perception that the downtown jewelry industry is replete with corruption. As with any segment of society, there is and likely always will be an unprincipled element who will prey upon the unsuspecting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001
Re "Citing Health Hazards, State Halts Jewelry Making in an L.A. Building," July 28: We know there is a problem with toxic materials in the jewelry district, but here is another case of "Big Brotherism" in the form of the California Environmental Protection Agency. This sort of thing has been responsible for most of the corporate flight from Los Angeles over the last 45 years. How many of us remember the extensive auto and furniture manufacturing industries in this city? Now we have a focus on the jewelry industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1999 | NANCY TREJOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A ring of jewelry thieves that for decades has terrorized the jewelry industry throughout the country is resurfacing locally, police say. "It's rearing its ugly head again," said Det. Mike Woodings of the Los Angeles Police Department. Woodings, who has been tracking the ring since 1988, said the holdup of an Encino jewelry manufacturer last week appears to be the work of the national syndicate.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2006 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
The diamond industry had reason to fear "Blood Diamond." The movie, set in 1990s Sierra Leone, is two-plus hours of brutal violence and corrupt gem dealing -- opening smack in the middle of the biggest diamond-buying season of the year. Early on, its star, Leonardo DiCaprio, went on record saying he now forbids his dates to wear diamonds. Amnesty International and Global Witness took the opportunity to publicize human rights abuses.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1992 | CRISSY GONZALEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cubic zirconia: a girl's best friend? Maybe, had Marilyn Monroe cooed the catchy Robin & Styne song about diamonds in the '90s instead of the '40s. The deepening recession and long-term changes in consumer behavior have combined to deal the retail jewelry industry its hardest blow in 20 years. Doing fine, however, are stores offering imitation jewelry such as cubic zirconia rings and polished gold overlay necklaces.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2008 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
Environmentalists want you to buy organic roses, and human rights groups tout conflict-free diamonds. Now, just in time for Valentine's Day, jewelry retailers are stepping up a campaign that aims to discourage the mining and sale of "dirty gold." A group of prominent jewelers including Tiffany & Co.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2008 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
In February 2006, a 4-year-old child changed the jewelry business. The little boy, brought to a Minneapolis hospital emergency room because of vomiting and a stomachache, got steadily worse. After four days, he died. During an autopsy, a heart-shaped metal charm was found in the stomach of the boy, whose identity wasn't revealed. The piece of metal had the word Reebok printed on it. The charm had come with a pair of children's sneakers. A test revealed it to be 99.1% lead.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2007 | From Reuters
Jewelry and accessories retailer Claire's Stores Inc. said Tuesday that it would be acquired by private equity firm Apollo Management for about $3.1 billion. Apollo would pay $33 a share for Claire's, which targets girls and young women with its baubles. Shares of Pembroke Pines, Fla.-based Claire's rose $1.12 to $31.88 after the announcement. Claire's said members of its founding family, who own about one-third of the company's voting shares, would support the deal.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2007 | Frank D. Roylance, Baltimore Sun
Diamonds may be a girl's best friend, but when it comes to paying for the expensive sparklers, the boy's best friend may be Stephen D. Lux. Lux is a chemical engineer whose company, Gemesis Corp., turns out thousands of gem-quality yellow diamonds every month from a factory in Sarasota, Fla. Gem snobs may never go for them. But they're not fakes -- no cheap cubic zirconias, no moissanites these.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2007 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
First it was organic fruits and vegetables. Then it was clothing manufactured outside of sweatshop conditions. Now, this Valentine's Day, the hottest item for the caring consumer is ethical jewelry -- diamonds, gold and silver that have been mined free of conflict and pollution. On the heels of the movie "Blood Diamond," several top jewelry retailers have pledged to support more socially responsible mining. A few companies have gone even further, selling recycled stones or diamonds from Canada.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2006 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
The diamond industry had reason to fear "Blood Diamond." The movie, set in 1990s Sierra Leone, is two-plus hours of brutal violence and corrupt gem dealing -- opening smack in the middle of the biggest diamond-buying season of the year. Early on, its star, Leonardo DiCaprio, went on record saying he now forbids his dates to wear diamonds. Amnesty International and Global Witness took the opportunity to publicize human rights abuses.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1999 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surveying a recent crowd of Valentine's Day customers stooped over display cases filled with diamond rings and jeweled necklaces, a security guard at Tiffany & Co. in Beverly Hills shook his head in disbelief. "It's like Christmas all over again," he said.
NEWS
February 12, 1999 | ROSE APODACA JONES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With award season well underway, all that glitters is not gold for stars such as Jim Carrey, Sandra Bullock and Salma Hayek. They are among the thousands of recent converts, celebrity and not, to platinum jewelry. They love its understated luxury. It's among the strongest and rarest of metals, and it doesn't tarnish. What's more, after more than half a century of gold fever, metal fans are charmed by its sense of newness over the yellow stuff.
NEWS
September 7, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
THREE months before the release of the new Leonardo DiCaprio film "Blood Diamond," the diamond industry is mounting a publicity campaign to highlight steps it has taken to reduce the flow of illegally traded "conflict diamonds" that have helped finance brutal regimes in Africa. The New York-based World Diamond Council took out full-page advertisements in major publications here and abroad on Wednesday announcing the creation of an Internet website, diamondfacts.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2006 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
China's last empress dowager, Cixi, was said to have so loved tourmaline that on her deathbed in 1908, the ironfisted ruler demanded that a pink gemstone mined in Pala, Calif., be placed on her finger. The story may be apocryphal, but Yu Chuan Yih, who also goes by Lorenzo, has good reason to promote it. As chief executive of LJ International, Yih has been producing tourmaline, amethyst and other semiprecious jewelry in China for the last two decades.
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