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Jewelry Industry

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BUSINESS
February 10, 1994 | VIVIAN MARINO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The sparkle has returned to the jewelry industry after years of, well, lusterless sales. An improved economy, repeal of the luxury tax and new marketing options, such as home-shopping television, are behind the turnaround, which began a year ago. "I think the confidence in wearing jewelry is coming back," said Simon Teakle, who heads the U.S. jewelry division of Christie's auction house, where 1993 sales rose 25% over the previous year.
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BUSINESS
September 16, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Some people wait years before their creative talents are recognized. Robert Keith waited less than 24 hours. It was 2005 and Keith, a fashion photographer looking for a new challenge, had just made his first piece of fine jewelry: a gold ring that looked like a miniature version of a ship's anchor chain. "I was so proud of it, I put it on my finger and I went down the street the next day to a Starbucks," Keith said, "and a lady tapped me on the shoulder and said, 'Excuse me, where did you get that ring?
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BUSINESS
September 16, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
Some people wait years before their creative talents are recognized. Robert Keith waited less than 24 hours. It was 2005 and Keith, a fashion photographer looking for a new challenge, had just made his first piece of fine jewelry: a gold ring that looked like a miniature version of a ship's anchor chain. "I was so proud of it, I put it on my finger and I went down the street the next day to a Starbucks," Keith said, "and a lady tapped me on the shoulder and said, 'Excuse me, where did you get that ring?
BUSINESS
July 17, 2012 | By William D'Urso, Los Angeles Time
State officials have filed a lawsuit against 16 downtown Los Angeles jewelry stores and distributors, accusing them of selling items with toxic levels of lead. Capping a three-year investigation, the state Department of Toxic Substances Control said at a news conference Tuesday that it had seized 306 pieces of jewelry that were found to be tainted with high levels of lead and cadmium. The jewelry seized was mainly inexpensive adult and children's jewelry, said Brian Johnson, the department's deputy director of enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1993
I am compelled to correct a misperception that was created as a result of several statements attributed to me in Timothy Williams' article, "A Case With Many Facets" (Sept. 29). Regrettably, the article has reinforced an undeserved image regarding the merchants in the Los Angeles jewelry district. Further, the observations I made to Williams, when viewed out of context, serve only to fuel the perception that the downtown jewelry industry is replete with corruption. As with any segment of society, there is and likely always will be an unprincipled element who will prey upon the unsuspecting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001
Re "Citing Health Hazards, State Halts Jewelry Making in an L.A. Building," July 28: We know there is a problem with toxic materials in the jewelry district, but here is another case of "Big Brotherism" in the form of the California Environmental Protection Agency. This sort of thing has been responsible for most of the corporate flight from Los Angeles over the last 45 years. How many of us remember the extensive auto and furniture manufacturing industries in this city? Now we have a focus on the jewelry industry.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2012 | By William D'Urso, Los Angeles Time
State officials have filed a lawsuit against 16 downtown Los Angeles jewelry stores and distributors, accusing them of selling items with toxic levels of lead. Capping a three-year investigation, the state Department of Toxic Substances Control said at a news conference Tuesday that it had seized 306 pieces of jewelry that were found to be tainted with high levels of lead and cadmium. The jewelry seized was mainly inexpensive adult and children's jewelry, said Brian Johnson, the department's deputy director of enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1999 | NANCY TREJOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A ring of jewelry thieves that for decades has terrorized the jewelry industry throughout the country is resurfacing locally, police say. "It's rearing its ugly head again," said Det. Mike Woodings of the Los Angeles Police Department. Woodings, who has been tracking the ring since 1988, said the holdup of an Encino jewelry manufacturer last week appears to be the work of the national syndicate.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1992 | CRISSY GONZALEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cubic zirconia: a girl's best friend? Maybe, had Marilyn Monroe cooed the catchy Robin & Styne song about diamonds in the '90s instead of the '40s. The deepening recession and long-term changes in consumer behavior have combined to deal the retail jewelry industry its hardest blow in 20 years. Doing fine, however, are stores offering imitation jewelry such as cubic zirconia rings and polished gold overlay necklaces.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1999 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surveying a recent crowd of Valentine's Day customers stooped over display cases filled with diamond rings and jeweled necklaces, a security guard at Tiffany & Co. in Beverly Hills shook his head in disbelief. "It's like Christmas all over again," he said.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2008 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
In February 2006, a 4-year-old child changed the jewelry business. The little boy, brought to a Minneapolis hospital emergency room because of vomiting and a stomachache, got steadily worse. After four days, he died. During an autopsy, a heart-shaped metal charm was found in the stomach of the boy, whose identity wasn't revealed. The piece of metal had the word Reebok printed on it. The charm had come with a pair of children's sneakers. A test revealed it to be 99.1% lead.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2006 | Tanika White, Baltimore Sun
First he raided your grooming products. Then he usurped your aesthetician. And now, ladies, not even your jewelry box is safe. Today, men are buying themselves bracelets, rings and pendant necklaces with increasing frequency and wearing their bling with a confidence and flair heretofore unseen in the Western world, according to fashion experts and industry observers.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday announced another delay in its push to assert its clout over banks in the brokerage business. The commission said it was extending until March 31, 2005, a legal exemption that bank brokerages have from SEC oversight. The exemption had been scheduled to expire this month. The SEC has been attempting to impose a new set of rules -- known as Regulation B -- on bank brokerages. But opposition has been fierce.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
San Francisco-based Wells Fargo & Co. received clearance from federal antitrust enforcers to acquire Strong Capital Management Inc., which was penalized this year for improper mutual fund trading. The Justice Department cleared the sale by Strong Capital founder Richard Strong, according to the Federal Register. The transaction also needs the Federal Reserve Board's approval.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Tiffany & Co., American International Group Inc. and other jewelry and insurance businesses will be the next group of companies required by the U.S. to train staff and check transactions with clients to catch money launderers. The U.S. Treasury's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network plans to issue rules in the next 30 days to extend the 2001 Patriot Act's rules intended to prevent money laundering and the financing of terrorism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When state regulators moved to close down a Los Angeles jewelry manufacturing center recently, they stunned not only business owners in the thriving downtown district but also local government officials, who had been working for nearly two years to get the industry to voluntarily improve safety conditions. The jewelry makers complain that they were blindsided by the state action after working with Los Angeles city building and fire officials to improve their operations.
NEWS
February 12, 1999 | ROSE APODACA JONES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With award season well underway, all that glitters is not gold for stars such as Jim Carrey, Sandra Bullock and Salma Hayek. They are among the thousands of recent converts, celebrity and not, to platinum jewelry. They love its understated luxury. It's among the strongest and rarest of metals, and it doesn't tarnish. What's more, after more than half a century of gold fever, metal fans are charmed by its sense of newness over the yellow stuff.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2008 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
In February 2006, a 4-year-old child changed the jewelry business. The little boy, brought to a Minneapolis hospital emergency room because of vomiting and a stomachache, got steadily worse. After four days, he died. During an autopsy, a heart-shaped metal charm was found in the stomach of the boy, whose identity wasn't revealed. The piece of metal had the word Reebok printed on it. The charm had come with a pair of children's sneakers. A test revealed it to be 99.1% lead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001
Re "Citing Health Hazards, State Halts Jewelry Making in an L.A. Building," July 28: We know there is a problem with toxic materials in the jewelry district, but here is another case of "Big Brotherism" in the form of the California Environmental Protection Agency. This sort of thing has been responsible for most of the corporate flight from Los Angeles over the last 45 years. How many of us remember the extensive auto and furniture manufacturing industries in this city? Now we have a focus on the jewelry industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1999 | KURT STREETER
Jewelry thieves believed to be connected with a Colombian ring struck again Thursday night, this time in Castaic, robbing two jewelry wholesalers from Hong Kong of at least $140,000 in merchandise, according to Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies. Authorities said they believe the five thieves--four men and one woman--probably are part of a ring responsible for a series of similar robberies in the Los Angeles area and throughout the country in recent years.
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