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Jewelry Industry China

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BUSINESS
May 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
A fashion for platinum wedding rings among China's new middle class contributed to a record demand for the precious metal last year, an industry report said Monday. High demand from China's jewelry sector more than compensated for a decline in platinum's use for auto catalysts and investment products, according to the industry study released by British refiner Johnson Matthey PLC. Western sales of platinum to China in 1996 were 200,000 ounces contrasted with 130,000 ounces in 1995.
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NEWS
January 14, 2001 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea came from an Israeli billionaire. He had found refuge in Shanghai during World War II and wanted to give something back. His vision was to link the world's fastest-growing diamond market to the biggest dealers by building a global exchange for the gem in the city that had saved his life. Shoul Eisenberg died before the project could take off.
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NEWS
January 14, 2001 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea came from an Israeli billionaire. He had found refuge in Shanghai during World War II and wanted to give something back. His vision was to link the world's fastest-growing diamond market to the biggest dealers by building a global exchange for the gem in the city that had saved his life. Shoul Eisenberg died before the project could take off.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
A fashion for platinum wedding rings among China's new middle class contributed to a record demand for the precious metal last year, an industry report said Monday. High demand from China's jewelry sector more than compensated for a decline in platinum's use for auto catalysts and investment products, according to the industry study released by British refiner Johnson Matthey PLC. Western sales of platinum to China in 1996 were 200,000 ounces contrasted with 130,000 ounces in 1995.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1993 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Andrew Cherng started out modestly 20 years ago with the original Panda Inn, a tiny family restaurant in a converted trailer in Pasadena. Now he's the king of Chinese fast food, with a chain of more than 100 Panda Express outlets nationwide and sales expected to top $100 million this year. The secret to his success? Not ambitious planning, nor a grand vision, he maintains--not even a special Szechuan sauce. Rather, he says, he's expanded and prospered through efficiency.
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