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Jewelry

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- Artwork and jewelry worth more than $5 million has been stolen from a home in Rancho Santa Fe, the San Diego County Sheriff's Department announced Tuesday. Eleven paintings were stolen, including a Monet print and a Pissarro print. Sculptures, some Chinese and some by Andreas von Zadora-Gerlof, were taken along with the jewelry, including elaborate gold, tourmaline, diamond, cabochon, and citrine necklaces and bracelet sets, the Sheriff's Department said. The theft occurred June 17 or June 18. A $1,000 reward is being offered for information leading to an arrest.
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BUSINESS
July 2, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Federal prosecutors are accusing a former Tiffany & Co. vice president of swiping and selling $1.3 million in jewelry over a two-year span, charging her with one count each of wire fraud and interstate transportation of stolen property. Ingrid Lederhaas-Okun, 46, worked for the Manhattan company as a vice president of design and product development, according to her LinkedIn profile. Her position at the company, which a criminal complaint unsealed Tuesday called “one of the world's premier high-end jewelers,” required her to work with manufacturing partners on production costs and requirements for the upscale bijoux.
IMAGE
June 29, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
LAS VEGAS - Any hard-core horological enthusiast will be quick to tell you that there's always been a lot more to a high-end wristwatch than tracking the hours, minutes and seconds. But that doesn't mean luxury watch brands aren't continually trying to add new bells and whistles (figuratively and in some cases literally) to their collections of wrist candy. The recent JCK Swiss Watch and Couture Jewelry shows here were full of watches that did more - in some cases a lot more - than simply relay the time, as well as others that told the time in very unexpected ways.
NEWS
June 29, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Babies love to put everything in their mouths. Add teething to the mix, and they want to gum and chew everything in sight. They also love to grab anything they get close to, including Mom's hair, jewelry, glasses, clothes -- you name it. This can wreak havoc, as anyone who's had a pierced earring tugged on can attest. Or worse, looked down to see a string of pearls coming apart as a tiny fist gives a solid yank. But there's a solution, at least when it comes to jewelry. A company called Chewbeads makes safety-tested necklaces and bracelets out of a non-toxic silicone that they say can withstand the trials of babies.
IMAGE
June 23, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
As one of a new generation of fine jewelry designers making the heirlooms of tomorrow, Irene Neuwirth is living the California dream. In 13 years, she has gone from stringing vintage glass beads together in her Malibu apartment to having the top-selling fine jewelry brand at Barneys New York. Her jewelry sparkles on red carpets alongside that from such heavyweights as Harry Winston and Cartier. (In the last few months, Busy Philipps wore an Irene Neuwirth necklace to the Screen Actors Guild Awards, Julianne Moore a matched set of emerald bracelets to the Met Gala and Julia Louis-Dreyfus onyx earrings to the Critics' Choice TV Awards.)
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By Booth Moore
LAS VEGAS - At the fine jewelry show known as Couture Las Vegas a few weeks ago, there was one big take-away: The sky's the limit. With the economy recovering and gold prices dropping, the fine jewelry business is booming.  I talk with Los Angeles Times Assistant Managing Editor Alice Short about the trends in jewelry in the video here. Notably, gold is back. Gold prices surged over most of the last decade, peaking at nearly $1,900 an ounce in August 2011 and forcing jewelry designers to adjust by augmenting their collections with lower-priced metals such as silver and copper.
NEWS
June 17, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Monique Pean  is one of the most talented new American jewelry designers working today. She founded her line in 2006, bringing a sustainable approach to her work by using recycled gold and conflict-free stones. Since then she's attracted the attention of the Council of Fashion Designers of America, winning the Vogue Fashion Fund Award in 2009*, and of First Lady Michelle Obama, model Karlie Kloss, actresses Jennifer Lawrence and Emma Watson, and many more who have worn her unique designs.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2013 | By Shan Li
Wealthy shoppers will refrain from scooping up expensive handbags, shoes and other discretionary items even as the economy recovers and the stock market soars, a study found. In the second half of 2013, the rich will rein in their spending on material things and seek out experiences that may garner more satisfaction, according to a Luxury Institute survey. "People are less interested in watches and more interested in building lasting memories," said Milton Pedraza, chief executive of the Luxury Institute.
SCIENCE
May 31, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Did ancient Egyptians prize meteorites so much that they turned them into jewelry? A new study of a 5,000-year-old iron bead hints that the rocky fragments that fell from the sky may have held a special place in the ancient civilization. The findings published in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science center around one of the small, tube-shaped beads pulled from tombs in the Gerzeh cemetery on the Nile's western bank, dating from 3600 BC to 3350 BC. Researchers have long wondered whether the metal in the iron beads had alien origins.
OPINION
May 27, 2013 | By Jim Hogan
My son, Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Donald J. Hogan, was killed in Helmand province in August 2009. In the days and weeks that followed, my wife, Carla, and I spent a lot of time with the 100 or so Marines who served with him. We asked them what they needed most, and the answer was unexpected. Infantry members spend all their time on their feet. They have no laundry facilities, so they wash their socks in irrigation canals and air-dry them. But the sand and grit make them unusable again within a couple of days.
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