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OPINION
June 27, 2012 | By Shahrzad Elghanayan
Imagine where the U.S. economy would be today if John Jacob Astor, Cornelius Vanderbilt, Andrew Carnegie or any of the magnates who helped turn America into an industrialized society had been gunned down by a revolutionary firing squad. In 1979, that is what happened in Iran to my grandfather, Habib Elghanian, Iran's most prominent Jewish industrialist and philanthropist. My grandfather's execution was not only a personal loss but a turning point for Iran. His execution and the subsequent fleeing of businessmen from Iran contributed to derailing the country's chances of building a modern, diversified, export-based economy, and foreshadowed Iran's neglect of its most valuable resource: its people.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Reed Johnson
When the Skirball Cultural Center launched its Latin Jewish film series seven years ago, it caught some members of both ethnic groups by surprise. "People acted just shocked that there were Jews south of the border," said Jordan Peimer, the Skirball's director of programs. Today, that idea isn't likely to startle Skirball regulars. Over the years, the series, which was initially funded by the Irvine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, has exposed filmgoers to the Jews of Cuba (the documentary "Jubanos")
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BUSINESS
October 9, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
President Obama's nod to the idea of a short-term increase in the debt limit has people talking about whether offering Republicans this option is smart or dumb. Smart: It relieves the pressure of near-term brinkmanship. Dumb: It just means there will be another standoff crisis in a few weeks.  There's a certain small amount of value in buying time, however; the question is whether anything good happens in the interim. That question reminds me of a Jewish parable about the Polish landowner's talking dog, which I heard from the corporate conglomerator Meshulam Riklis in 1986.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
President Obama's nod to the idea of a short-term increase in the debt limit has people talking about whether offering Republicans this option is smart or dumb. Smart: It relieves the pressure of near-term brinkmanship. Dumb: It just means there will be another standoff crisis in a few weeks.  There's a certain small amount of value in buying time, however; the question is whether anything good happens in the interim. That question reminds me of a Jewish parable about the Polish landowner's talking dog, which I heard from the corporate conglomerator Meshulam Riklis in 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Reed Johnson
When the Skirball Cultural Center launched its Latin Jewish film series seven years ago, it caught some members of both ethnic groups by surprise. "People acted just shocked that there were Jews south of the border," said Jordan Peimer, the Skirball's director of programs. Today, that idea isn't likely to startle Skirball regulars. Over the years, the series, which was initially funded by the Irvine Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, has exposed filmgoers to the Jews of Cuba (the documentary "Jubanos")
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heresy it may have seemed, but Israel's deputy foreign minister was serious in his suggestion that world Jewry now needs Israel far more than the Jewish state needs the Diaspora that has supported it so loyally for so long.
NEWS
February 25, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Avraham Burg, an observant Jew and a political dove, this week vaulted into the nation's power elite by ascending to the Jewish Agency's chairmanship. The agency's 120-member board of governors on Wednesday elected Burg head of the oldest and most important institutional link between Israel and the Jewish Diaspora.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2003 | Chris Reynolds
Unless you have Andy Warhol photos of Impressionist paintings in King Tut's tomb, it's hard to be certain what will draw crowds to a museum. But if recent results at the Autry Museum of Western Heritage and the Skirball Cultural Center are a fair indication, the lives of far-flung Jews are a good bet. At the Autry in Griffith Park, officials say "Jewish Life in the American West: Generation to Generation" (which opened June 21 and continues through Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS
The Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., continues its "Translations: The Jewish Diaspora on Film"--a Sunday 2 p.m. series--this week with Zeno Dostal's enchanting Czech comedy "The Golet in the Valley." The film celebrates the joys and challenges of Ukrainian rural life between the world wars.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
The leaders of Poland's Roman Catholic Church have asked forgiveness for its toleration of anti-Semitism and disdain of non-Catholics in a letter of joint apologies for failings in its 2,000-year history. The bishops approved the letter late Friday at a special Jubilee Year session at the nation's holiest shrine in the southern city of Czestochowa. The contents were published Saturday by the Gazeta Wyborcza newspaper.
OPINION
June 27, 2012 | By Shahrzad Elghanayan
Imagine where the U.S. economy would be today if John Jacob Astor, Cornelius Vanderbilt, Andrew Carnegie or any of the magnates who helped turn America into an industrialized society had been gunned down by a revolutionary firing squad. In 1979, that is what happened in Iran to my grandfather, Habib Elghanian, Iran's most prominent Jewish industrialist and philanthropist. My grandfather's execution was not only a personal loss but a turning point for Iran. His execution and the subsequent fleeing of businessmen from Iran contributed to derailing the country's chances of building a modern, diversified, export-based economy, and foreshadowed Iran's neglect of its most valuable resource: its people.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2003 | Chris Reynolds
Unless you have Andy Warhol photos of Impressionist paintings in King Tut's tomb, it's hard to be certain what will draw crowds to a museum. But if recent results at the Autry Museum of Western Heritage and the Skirball Cultural Center are a fair indication, the lives of far-flung Jews are a good bet. At the Autry in Griffith Park, officials say "Jewish Life in the American West: Generation to Generation" (which opened June 21 and continues through Jan.
NEWS
February 25, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Avraham Burg, an observant Jew and a political dove, this week vaulted into the nation's power elite by ascending to the Jewish Agency's chairmanship. The agency's 120-member board of governors on Wednesday elected Burg head of the oldest and most important institutional link between Israel and the Jewish Diaspora.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heresy it may have seemed, but Israel's deputy foreign minister was serious in his suggestion that world Jewry now needs Israel far more than the Jewish state needs the Diaspora that has supported it so loyally for so long.
NEWS
January 4, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeshajahu "Shaike" Weinberg, the visionary founding director of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., who helped ensure that visitors gained vivid insight into European Jews' lives in the ghettos and Nazi death camps of World War II, has died. He was 81. Weinberg, who was also founding director of the Jewish Diaspora Museum in Tel Aviv, died Saturday in Tel Aviv of a stroke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1992
Germany and Spain loom so large in the 2,000-year history of the Jewish Diaspora that Jews even in Israel still identify themselves as either Ashkenazim or Sephardim, literally "Germans" or "Span- iards." But Ashkenazi culture was shattered by the Shoah, Nazi Germany's failed attempt to exterminate the Jews. And Sephardi culture was, if not shattered, then at least scattered by the expulsion of the Jews from Spain by royal decree on March 31, 1492.
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