Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJewish Foundation For Christian Rescuers
IN THE NEWS

Jewish Foundation For Christian Rescuers

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An internationally known Encino rabbi and a Southern California Gas Co. official were honored for humane service Thursday night in the Valley Interfaith Council's third annual fund-raising dinner at the Warner Center Marriott Hotel. Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis, senior rabbi of Valley Beth Shalom, was presented the human relations award for founding the Jewish Foundation for Christian Rescuers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1991 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An internationally known Encino rabbi and a Southern California Gas Co. official were honored for humane service Thursday night in the Valley Interfaith Council's third annual fund-raising dinner at the Warner Center Marriott Hotel. Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis, senior rabbi of Valley Beth Shalom, was presented the human relations award for founding the Jewish Foundation for Christian Rescuers.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 2, 1992
Venice Family Clinic's Venice Art Walk '92, held May 30-31 at the studios of local artists, attracted 4,200 guests and raised $500,000. Proceeds will provide health care to thousands who have no other access to quality care. Sheila Goldberg was chairwoman. Laura Maslon was publicity chairwoman. Jewish Foundation for Christian Rescuers/Anti-Defamation League honored 81-year-old Sister Klara Jaroszynska and 90-year-old Brone Straupiene for saving the lives of Jews during World War II.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1992 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spurred by Holocaust-like images and phrases such as "ethnic cleansing," about 125 Jews gathered on Los Angeles' Westside on Friday to urge world leaders to stop the Serbs' alleged mistreatment of their Muslim and Croat foes in Bosnia-Herzegovina. "It is happening again," warned Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis of Valley Beth Shalom Temple. "The shock of recognition is overwhelming. We've heard it before."
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | LAURENT BELSIE, THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
Rabbi Harold Schulweis began his search for moral heroes when his children sat down to watch a television special on the Holocaust. "I had this strange feeling of wanting them to see it," he recalled in a telephone interview, but "hoping that they would not leave totally despaired and paranoiac." For Schulweis, who lives in Oakland, the dilemma was doubly sharp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1994 | HAROLD M. SCHULWEIS, Rabbi Harold M. Schulweis is the founding chairman of the Jewish Foundation for Christian Rescuers / Anti-Defamation League.
Should we take our youngsters to see "Schindler's List"? Should we expose them to the excremental assault on the dignity of men, women and children during the horror years of the Holocaust? Or will we perhaps inadvertently lay a heavy stone of despair upon their young hearts? (The film is R-rated largely for its graphic portrayals of violence and terror that many adults find too painful to watch, but in context, the film is not unsuitable for older children.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Life had been a daily struggle for Erwin and Gertruda Moldrzyk that winter of 1945 in Jastrzebie-Zdroj, Poland. January was bitterly cold, and the farmer and his wife worried about their crops. They had two young daughters to feed and clothe. The Germans were in retreat, four months short of surrender. The Russians were advancing on Poland. But for peasant families like the Moldrzyks, there was one constant: poverty. Good Catholics that they were, they put their trust in God.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1991 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The apartment was ideally built, as though fate had meant it to be a hide-out for hunted people. Still, it is difficult to forget the frequent rebuilding of that damp, dark hole in which we hid and which we reached by walking through a clothes closet." -- A letter from Liza Aizenberg to Stasia and Jonas Ruzgis , 1961. It lasted three years. Or maybe four. A frightened 7-year-old could not really know for sure. All Rita Feitler knew was that she had to be still, extremely still.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|