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Jewish Heritage Center

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Music, song and storytelling celebrated the opening Sunday of the new Jewish Heritage Center on Los Angeles' Museum Row, bringing together the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, the Jewish Community Library and Jewish Historical Society of Southern California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Music, song and storytelling celebrated the opening Sunday of the new Jewish Heritage Center on Los Angeles' Museum Row, bringing together the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, the Jewish Community Library and Jewish Historical Society of Southern California.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2001
Address--The Jewish Heritage Center, starting point for tours sponsored by the Jewish Historical Society, is located at 6006 Wilshire Blvd. An incorrect address appears in a listing in this weekend's Sunday Calendar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2001 | TERESA WATANABE
A Christian conference aimed at uniting men of faith and encouraging them to be better husbands, fathers and community members is expected to draw more than 5,000 people today in Chino. David Rosales, senior pastor of Calvary Chapel of the Chino Valley, will lead the conference at the Ontario Convention Center from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Speakers will include Calvary Chapel leaders Chuck Smith, Raul Ries and others.
NEWS
October 26, 2003 | Karl Peter Kirk, Associated Press Writer
Perched on a plank high above the ark that once held a Torah scroll, Anita Peto draws another decorative circle, carefully copying the blurred shapes on a fading photograph taped to the scaffolding. The 24-year-old art restorer is putting together clues from the past to restore a crumbling rural synagogue to its former splendor when Mad was an important center in Hungarian Judaism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1995 | SCOTT HADLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In three new elegantly designed buildings meant to replace structures destroyed in last year's earthquake, architects for the Brandeis-Bardin Institute near Simi Valley hope to incorporate remembrances of the past. Shards of stained glass and pieces of wood from buildings damaged by the quake will be placed in the new structures, as the 50-year-old Jewish institution gets back on its feet and faces the future.
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