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Jewish Historical Society Of Southern California

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Music, song and storytelling celebrated the opening Sunday of the new Jewish Heritage Center on Los Angeles' Museum Row, bringing together the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, the Jewish Community Library and Jewish Historical Society of Southern California.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Music, song and storytelling celebrated the opening Sunday of the new Jewish Heritage Center on Los Angeles' Museum Row, bringing together the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, the Jewish Community Library and Jewish Historical Society of Southern California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2000
The Breed Street Shul in Boyle Heights--long a crumbling reminder of a once-strong Jewish presence in East Los Angeles--was one of 37 historical sites nationwide awarded a preservation grant from the J. Paul Getty Foundation, officials announced Thursday. The $30,000 grant, given to the Jewish Historical Society of Southern California, is part of an effort to save historical landmarks that have become victims of neglect. Stephen J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2000
Long before the term "multicultural" became popular in Los Angeles, Boyle Heights was the city's melting pot. Today, the Eastside area contains only fading remnants of the Jewish, Japanese, Italian and Russian communities that once shared the area with Mexican families, who are still there. But the Japanese American National Museum is launching a two-year project to preserve the ethnic history of the 120-year-old community, and it is calling on former and current Boyle Heights residents to help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2001
Today it's hard to believe that the Breed Street Shul was once home to the largest Orthodox Jewish congregation in Los Angeles. Rain and graffiti taggers have damaged the frescoes in the Boyle Heights temple's brick sanctuary. Pigeons have made their home amid pews engraved with the Star of David, and a forbidding chain link fence now keeps out the drug dealers and gang bangers who in recent years had operated out of a smaller frame building on the property.
OPINION
January 25, 2003
Not for nothing did the Jews of Boyle Heights affectionately call the Breed Street Shul the "Queen of the Shuls." Congregation Talmud Torah of Los Angeles -- the synagogue's official name -- was home to the largest of some 30 congregations that once served the 75,000 Jews, most of them immigrants from Eastern Europe, who found their way to Boyle Heights and City Terrace starting a century ago.
REAL ESTATE
May 12, 1991 | EVELYN DE WOLFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The successful preservation of six buildings will be honored at the Los Angeles Conservancy's 1991 Preservation Awards luncheon Wednesday in the Biltmore Hotel, an event that also marks the 25th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 that created the National Register.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1998
Visit South L.A.'s and West Adams' onetime synagogues and other Jewish sites during a historic bus tour co-sponsored by the University of Judaism and the Jewish Historical Society of Southern California. Participants will visit several former synagogue buildings--most with Stars of David still visible in the masonry--that are now churches. Two historic temples in Venice--Mishkan Tefilo and the Pacific Jewish Center--will also be included on the route.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2003 | Larry B. Stammer, Times Staff Writer
Jewish historians are turning back the clock to examine how Passover was celebrated in California and the West in the 19th century. Today, as Jews prepare to observe Passover, which begins Wednesday at sundown, Southern California has the nation's second-largest Jewish population -- roughly 600,000. By contrast, the overwhelmingly Catholic pueblo of Los Angeles of 1854 had fewer than 200 Jewish residents and no kosher bakery or butcher shop.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
Maria Cabildo pries open the door of the old bathhouse at 1st and Chicago streets that has been boarded up since a 1986 earthquake rendered it unsafe. Plaster is crumbling, warped ceilings look as if they will cave in and floorboards are visible through the worn linoleum. Pigeons fly into rooms through windows long missing glass. Some bird carcasses lie in the middle of former bedrooms, feathers clinging to doors and walls. "This is where birds in East L.A.
MAGAZINE
May 14, 2006 | Rick Wartzman
Everybody likes to watch a good scuffle, but never more so than when it falls into the Cain-and-Abel category. To a Lakers fan like me, the team's playoff run has been thrilling. Yet it was the Shaq versus Kobe soap opera of a few seasons ago that proved particularly, and perversely, captivating. When former Walt Disney Co. CEO Michael Eisner sparred with Pixar's Steve Jobs, it was compelling theater.
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