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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Museum of the History of Polish Jews opens Friday in Warsaw, partly funded by the Polish government. It's located in the area that was once the Warsaw ghetto during World War II, in what was Nazi-occupied Europe. The museum aims not just to provide education about the history of Polish Jews, but to dispel any lingering anti-Semitism seven decades after the Holocaust. It also celebrates the rich traditions and culture of Jews from Warsaw, the capital of Poland, once one of the largest Jewish communities in Europe.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Time Television Critic
Simon Schama, the British historian and television personality and name-in-the-title host of "Simon Schama's History of Britain," "Simon Schama's Power of Art," "Simon Schama's Shakespeare" and "Simon Schama's Obama's America," is back with "Simon Schama's The Story of the Jews. " Premiering Tuesday on PBS, it attempts to distill 3,000 years of Jewish history into five hours of TV and does a fine, if necessarily incomplete, job of it. Like many British documentaries - the series originally aired in September on the BBC - "The Story of the Jews" comes with a personal touch.
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NEWS
November 14, 1995
Amos Funkenstein, 58, educator and internationally known scholar of Jewish and medieval history. Born in the territory that later became Israel, Funkenstein was educated at Ma'ale, a religious school in Jerusalem, at Hebrew University and the Free University of Berlin. In 1967, he began teaching history at UCLA and later taught at Tel Aviv University, Stanford and UC Berkeley.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Timberg
When telling a tale that includes centuries of endurance, moments of triumph, bursts of humor and sudden, unspeakable atrocities, what's the right tone with which to articulate it all? That's the trick historian Simon Schama had to figure out in his new documentary, "The Story of the Jews," which begins in the Middle Eastern desert about 3,000 years ago and tracks up to the more-or-less present. The program, in five hourlong parts, broadcasts on PBS on Tuesday and April 1. "I wanted to say, without putting on a ridiculous smiley face or making light of the tragic aspects, that there is a story to be told beyond one clearly framed by the assumption of catastrophe," the British historian said in Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1997 | LISA FERNANDEZ
Moorpark College is offering an off-campus class on the history of the Jewish people beginning Aug. 18. Taught by Igor Abraham Kotler, a UCLA history professor and a former fellow at the Wilstein Institute of Jewish Policy Studies, the class will focus on the contemporary Jewish experience as a product of major historical events and significant philosophical movements, said Sidney Adler, dean of humanities at Moorpark College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 2009 | By Corina Knoll
The challah was blessed, the Manischewitz wine was poured, the candles were lighted. It could have been any Shabbat dinner in Los Angeles, were it not for the fact that it took place midweek and the room was full of Catholic schoolteachers. The 34 teachers were participants in Bearing Witness, a seminar designed for educators in Catholic schools learning to teach about anti-Semitism and the history of the relationship between Jews and Catholics. Created in 1996 by the Anti-Defamation League, the seminars are now conducted across the United States.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | MYRA VANDERPOOL GORMLEY
Question: I understand there is an international Jewish Genealogy Bulletin Board available for computer genealogists that can be used to exchange information about Jewish ancestors and obtain help translating Hebrew and Yiddish documents. How do I find it? Answer: You need a computer and a modem (set modem parameters, 1200 or 2400 baud, to no parity, eight bits, one stop bit and no echo). The Jewish Genealogy Conference Bulletin Board's number in Houston, Tex., is (713) 630-0553.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1991
UC Irvine and Orange County's Jewish community have raised $250,000 for an endowed professorship in Jewish history. History department chairman Michael Johnson said he hopes that a scholar will be named as early as the fall of 1992 for the post, the first endowed professorship in UCI's School of Humanities. "This endowment makes it possible for UCI to seek an historian of the highest caliber . . . in this extremely competitive area of historical study," Johnson said.
NEWS
April 24, 1986 | JUDITH JACOVITZ
When California was admitted to the Union in 1850, it has been reported that there were eight Jews living in Los Angeles. Nearly a century and a half later, that population has proliferated, with growth and contributions evidenced by the many historic sites around the city. Some are no longer in use; others have become homes for different faiths, nationalities or professions. Several landmarks have been designated historical buildings by the Cultural Heritage Board of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
In Luisa Leschin's new radio play, the Carvajal family has a secret, closely guarded by the grandparents. Although they live in Santa Fe in the 1860s, the Carvajals are not Catholics, like most of their neighbors. They are Conversos, secret Jews forced to convert or flee Spain when all Jews were expelled in 1492.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Even for a city in which architectural surprise is no surprise, the Wilshire Boulevard Temple surprises. Do yourself a favor and step inside; the interior has just been magnificently restored. A radiant 1929 mural surrounds the domed synagogue, conveying Jewish history from biblical times to the arrival of Jews in the New World in vivid Hollywood-esque imagery. Commissioned by the Warner brothers, it defies an orthodox reading of the Second Commandment, which forbids graven images.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
For a disorganized film that has trouble deciding what it's about, "When Comedy Went to School" can be a lot of fun. Nominally the story of why the resorts of New York state's Catskill Mountains witnessed the birth of modern stand-up comedy, this documentary is best when it sticks to footage of those very funny comics, either being interviewed or doing bits. Erratically created by directors Mevlut Akkaya and Ron Frank and screenwriter Lawrence Richards, "When Comedy Went to School" certainly knows who's funny.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | By Larry Harnisch, Los Angeles Times
What is the Jewish experience in Los Angeles? "Nobody even thinks about Jews being here or, if they do, maybe they think about Hollywood," said Karen Wilson, guest curator at the Autry National Center. "They might possibly, if they're local, think about Boyle Heights. But there's not a sort of instantly recognizable image. " The question is at the heart of a new exhibit, "Jews in the Los Angeles Mosaic. " It proposes many answers in many voices, speaking in a multitude of tongues.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Museum of the History of Polish Jews opens Friday in Warsaw, partly funded by the Polish government. It's located in the area that was once the Warsaw ghetto during World War II, in what was Nazi-occupied Europe. The museum aims not just to provide education about the history of Polish Jews, but to dispel any lingering anti-Semitism seven decades after the Holocaust. It also celebrates the rich traditions and culture of Jews from Warsaw, the capital of Poland, once one of the largest Jewish communities in Europe.
OPINION
January 4, 2013 | By Ben Kamin
JERUSALEM - It's different each time, the sensation driven by my religious body temperature at the moment, each occasion leavened by the vicissitudes of life, by doubt, skepticism, spiritual immobility or vague rhapsody - and certainly by my own vanities. One first has to get past the sense of being an intruder, even if one is incontrovertibly Jewish, because the landlords of Jerusalem's Western Wall, a conglomerate of stern, bearded men from a variety of ecclesiastic tribes, are rather possessive of their default contract with the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2012 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
El Iluminado A Graphic Novel Ilan Stavans and Steve Sheinkin Basic Books: 208 pp, $24.99 Halfway into the graphic novel "El Iluminado," a Spanish literature professor in an Indiana Jones hat wanders into a café in Santa Fe, N.M., and receives a pearl of wisdom from a gray-haired woman. "A Jewish soul is a Jewish soul," the woman says. "When you have it, you know. " The professor is a real person: Ilan Stavans, a Latino literary maven known for his insightful criticism, his authoritative anthologies and his quirky translation of "Don Quixote" into the mother tongue of millions of Americans, Spanglish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1993 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting on the eve of the Jewish New Year, UC Irvine announced Wednesday the appointment of a Florida professor to its first-ever endowed chair in Jewish history. "This is especially timely now, given the headlines about the agreement between Israel and the PLO," said Scott Nelson, a university spokesman. "There has been significant interest in the subject expressed by students and faculty members; it's a valid area of scholarly interest."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rabbi David Neiman, 82, an archeologist and scholar in Bible studies, Jewish history and the relationship between the Catholic Church and the Jews, died Feb. 22 of cancer in Los Angeles. Neiman was born in Russia and came with his family to the United States in 1923. Raised in New York City, Neiman graduated from City College of New York and earned his master's degree at the University of Chicago and his doctorate at Dropsie College for Hebrew and Cognate Learning in Philadelphia.
WORLD
November 11, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Unique not only in its high-tech content but also in its political importance, a museum of Jewish history and culture opened to the public Sunday in Moscow, the capital of a nation beset by anti-Semitism for more than two centuries. Several hundred visitors filed into the more than 90,000-square-foot former bus garage and found themselves immersed in a lesson in tolerance. "The opening of such a museum in Moscow is a qualitatively new stage of Jewish life in Russia," said Alexander Boroda, president of the Federation of Jewish Communities in Russia.
WORLD
September 18, 2012 | Barbara Demick
The family always knew there was something mysterious about Wang Fanglian, secrets he dared not share with even his closest relatives. Although he was just an ordinary worker at a diesel engine factory, he spoke four languages, among them English with a guttural German accent. His narrow brick-faced house had a flush toilet, a gas stove and a balcony for drying clothes, all strange luxuries in his rickshaw-wide Shanghai alley. Only late in life did Wang explain himself, when it was safe to talk about his friendships with Jews.
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