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Jewish Homes For Aging

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1985
Philanthropists Ben B. and Joyce Eisenberg have donated $1 million to the Jewish Homes for the Aging of Greater Los Angeles. The money will go for construction of a building at the organization's Grancell Village in Reseda, a spokesman for the group said Wednesday. Eisenberg, a member of the group's support, the Guardians of the Jewish Homes, operates a building management corporation.
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BUSINESS
April 15, 2009 | Lisa Girion
Brotman Medical Center in Culver City, with the help of the Jewish Home for the Aging, emerged from bankruptcy protection Tuesday in a way that may result in a new senior living facility on the Westside. The 420-bed hospital said it returned to profitability after securing $29 million in financing, including $23 million in loans from the Jewish home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1985
Harry B. Seelig, an attorney who served the Jewish Homes for the Aging of Greater Los Angeles for more than 50 years, twice as the organization's president, was killed Monday in a traffic accident. He was 82 and at his death was secretary and legal adviser to the Jewish Homes, one of the largest residential care facilities for the aged in the United States. Seelig, president of the Homes in 1955 and 1956, led a local band as a youth before obtaining a law degree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2000 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elderly women chat over a kosher meal in a dining room. Older men listen to a rabbi during a daily worship service. Aged couples gather in common rooms to celebrate sacred holidays and traditions. Since 1913, the Los Angeles Jewish Home for the Aging has provided residential care for the city's elderly Jewish population, a demographic that is expected to double by 2040, officials said.
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | ARNOLD LEVINSON, Times Staff Writer
When Leon Seaman was 90 and his wife, Ruth, not yet 80, he confronted her one day at the door of their Palm Springs home. "Don't come with me," he angrily told her that day five years ago. "I have my cane, I don't want to hurt you, but I have to go to the police. My wife stole my money." After months of more insults, Ruth Seaman started thinking about a divorce.
REAL ESTATE
June 23, 1985 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Sheldon J. Blumenthal likes to repeat what he terms "a traditional Jewish greeting" that goes: "May you live to be 120." Hardly anybody lives that long, but Blumenthal, executive director of Jewish Homes for the Aging of Greater Los Angeles in Reseda, is seeing more and more people getting close to it. "And why not?" he asks. "That's what Moses did, and he could see and hear and have sex. He was very healthy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2000 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elderly women chat over a kosher meal in a dining room. Older men listen to a rabbi during a daily worship service. Aged couples gather in common rooms to celebrate sacred holidays and traditions. Since 1913, the Los Angeles Jewish Home for the Aging has provided residential care for the city's elderly Jewish population, a demographic that is expected to double by 2040, officials said.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2009 | Lisa Girion
Brotman Medical Center in Culver City, with the help of the Jewish Home for the Aging, emerged from bankruptcy protection Tuesday in a way that may result in a new senior living facility on the Westside. The 420-bed hospital said it returned to profitability after securing $29 million in financing, including $23 million in loans from the Jewish home.
NEWS
June 20, 1986
For the first time in its 57-year history, the Ida Mayer Cummings Auxiliary of the Jewish Homes for the Aging will be headed by three presidents serving simultaneously. They are Dodo Bienenfeld, Muriel E. Seelig and Selma Udko.
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | ARNOLD LEVINSON, Times Staff Writer
When Leon Seaman was 90 and his wife, Ruth, not yet 80, he confronted her one day at the door of their Palm Springs home. "Don't come with me," he angrily told her that day five years ago. "I have my cane, I don't want to hurt you, but I have to go to the police. My wife stole my money." After months of more insults, Ruth Seaman started thinking about a divorce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1985
Philanthropists Ben B. and Joyce Eisenberg have donated $1 million to the Jewish Homes for the Aging of Greater Los Angeles. The money will go for construction of a building at the organization's Grancell Village in Reseda, a spokesman for the group said Wednesday. Eisenberg, a member of the group's support, the Guardians of the Jewish Homes, operates a building management corporation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1985
Harry B. Seelig, an attorney who served the Jewish Homes for the Aging of Greater Los Angeles for more than 50 years, twice as the organization's president, was killed Monday in a traffic accident. He was 82 and at his death was secretary and legal adviser to the Jewish Homes, one of the largest residential care facilities for the aged in the United States. Seelig, president of the Homes in 1955 and 1956, led a local band as a youth before obtaining a law degree.
REAL ESTATE
June 23, 1985 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Sheldon J. Blumenthal likes to repeat what he terms "a traditional Jewish greeting" that goes: "May you live to be 120." Hardly anybody lives that long, but Blumenthal, executive director of Jewish Homes for the Aging of Greater Los Angeles in Reseda, is seeing more and more people getting close to it. "And why not?" he asks. "That's what Moses did, and he could see and hear and have sex. He was very healthy."
NEWS
March 7, 1991
The Jewish Homes for the Aging has received a gift of $3.5 million from the Joyce E. and Ben B. Eisenberg Foundation. The foundation is named for Santa Monica philanthropist Joyce Eisenberg-Keefer and her late husband. The gift, in the form of an endowment, will provide the nonprofit homes for the Jewish elderly in Reseda with an ongoing financial base, a spokesman for the homes said.
NEWS
November 1, 1992
Sam Brand, 77, dean of publicists for Jewish organizations on the West Coast. His clients included the Jewish Homes for the Aging, which he represented for 30 years, and the Hebrew Union College, which he publicized for more than 25 years.
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