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SPORTS
September 5, 1993 | Associated Press
Red Manager Davey Johnson was hospitalized in Cincinnati because of dizziness and vision problems Saturday night during a 6-5 victory over the Philadelphia Phillies. A spokeswoman for Jewish Hospital said Johnson was examined and released. There was no word on what caused the dizziness. Johnson had high blood pressure and stomach problems when he managed the New York Mets, but had reported no problems this season.
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NEWS
July 5, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doctors who successfully implanted the first fully self-contained artificial heart in a human provided the first sparse details about its recipient Wednesday, describing a man in his mid- to late-50s, in "dire" condition, close to death from heart disease, diabetes and chronic kidney failure. Keeping his identity and hometown a secret, as requested by his family, the doctors said the man had suffered multiple previous heart attacks and had undergone coronary bypass surgery about nine years ago.
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NEWS
April 5, 1985
An Indiana teen-ager whose ailing heart was driven by a pair of plastic pumps until he received a human donor heart was alert and responsive, but his kidneys still were not functioning, officials said in Louisville, Ky. Michael C. Jones was in critical condition, and his chances of survival remained at 20% to 25% because of his kidney shutdown and the risk of infection, said Nancy Whitehead, a Jewish Hospital spokeswoman.
SPORTS
September 5, 1993 | Associated Press
Red Manager Davey Johnson was hospitalized in Cincinnati because of dizziness and vision problems Saturday night during a 6-5 victory over the Philadelphia Phillies. A spokeswoman for Jewish Hospital said Johnson was examined and released. There was no word on what caused the dizziness. Johnson had high blood pressure and stomach problems when he managed the New York Mets, but had reported no problems this season.
NEWS
July 5, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doctors who successfully implanted the first fully self-contained artificial heart in a human provided the first sparse details about its recipient Wednesday, describing a man in his mid- to late-50s, in "dire" condition, close to death from heart disease, diabetes and chronic kidney failure. Keeping his identity and hometown a secret, as requested by his family, the doctors said the man had suffered multiple previous heart attacks and had undergone coronary bypass surgery about nine years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2000 | STUART PFEIFER and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The family of track star Florence Griffith Joyner is blaming a St. Louis hospital for her death, charging in a lawsuit that doctors failed to detect a brain abnormality two years earlier. Joyner was rushed to Washington University's Barnes-Jewish Hospital in April 1996 after suffering a seizure on a flight to St. Louis, where she was to attend a relay race. The lawsuit, filed in a Missouri court under pseudonyms, says that hospital workers improperly interpreted an MRI and other tests.
SPORTS
March 29, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Cincinnati Red owner Marge Schott has been upgraded to good condition and has left the intensive care unit at Jewish Hospital in Cincinnati.
SPORTS
June 9, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Richard Brosseau, an assistant starter at Belmont Park, suffered several broken ribs when he was kicked while helping load a horse in the gate before the third race. He was taken to Long Island Jewish Hospital.
SPORTS
March 27, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Owner Marge Schott of the Cincinnati Reds, hospitalized since March 15, may move soon from intensive care to a private room, a spokesman for Jewish Hospital in Cincinnati said. The hospital has not identified Schott's ailment.
NEWS
April 5, 1985
An Indiana teen-ager whose ailing heart was driven by a pair of plastic pumps until he received a human donor heart was alert and responsive, but his kidneys still were not functioning, officials said in Louisville, Ky. Michael C. Jones was in critical condition, and his chances of survival remained at 20% to 25% because of his kidney shutdown and the risk of infection, said Nancy Whitehead, a Jewish Hospital spokeswoman.
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