Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJewish Museum
IN THE NEWS

Jewish Museum

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2005 | From Associated Press
An austere Nordic design in glass and limestone was chosen Thursday for Warsaw's new Jewish museum -- a rectangular building with a jagged passageway. The Museum of the History of Polish Jews, due to open in 2008, will depict Jewish life, which flourished for eight centuries in Poland before it was virtually wiped out under Nazi occupation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
November 11, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Unique not only in its high-tech content but also in its political importance, a museum of Jewish history and culture opened to the public Sunday in Moscow, the capital of a nation beset by anti-Semitism for more than two centuries. Several hundred visitors filed into the more than 90,000-square-foot former bus garage and found themselves immersed in a lesson in tolerance. "The opening of such a museum in Moscow is a qualitatively new stage of Jewish life in Russia," said Alexander Boroda, president of the Federation of Jewish Communities in Russia.
Advertisement
WORLD
November 11, 2012 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - Unique not only in its high-tech content but also in its political importance, a museum of Jewish history and culture opened to the public Sunday in Moscow, the capital of a nation beset by anti-Semitism for more than two centuries. Several hundred visitors filed into the more than 90,000-square-foot former bus garage and found themselves immersed in a lesson in tolerance. "The opening of such a museum in Moscow is a qualitatively new stage of Jewish life in Russia," said Alexander Boroda, president of the Federation of Jewish Communities in Russia.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
AmaWaterways' cruise and land tour highlights Jewish heritage in five countries along the Danube River. Synagogues in Budapest and Prague, Oscar Schindler's home in Germany, the setting for “The Sound of Music” in Austria and the site of the Nuremberg war-crimes trials are some of the highlights of the 13-night trip. It begins with two days touring Budapest before embarking on the small-ship river cruise for seven days. Participants will meet Rabbi Chatam Sofer and tour Bratislava in Slovakia, visit the Jewish Museum and Sigmund Freud's House in Vienna, and stop in Regensburg at Schindler's house and Nuremberg in Germany before ending with three nights in Prague.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
The National Museum of American Jewish History on Thursday announced plans to build a new facility that it hopes will raise the museum's profile and quadruple the number of annual visitors. The plans call for acquiring and razing a building on a prime corner of Independence Mall, located half a block from the museum's current downtown location. Museum director Gwen Goodman would not disclose the price of the building, which now houses two television stations and two radio stations.
NEWS
November 5, 1988 | From Reuters
West Berlin said on Friday it will build a $43-million Jewish museum and stage a major exhibition on the history of Jews. Cultural affairs spokesman Harald Jaener said the museum would be built as an extension of the existing Berlin Museum. "The two will be connected because the history of Jews in Berlin is an integral part of whole city's history," he said. Jaener said West Berlin planned a major exhibition on world Jewish history and the Diaspora for 1991-92.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A foundation created by Steven Spielberg is giving $1 million to the National Museum of American Jewish History. The money from the Righteous Persons Foundation will go toward a new five-story museum building being built in Philadelphia. With the donation, officials say the museum's capital campaign has raised $111 million toward its $150-million goal. The new museum is set to open in 2010.
NEWS
March 18, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Protesters chanted "Don't go in!" and "Shame on you!" as an exhibit on artists' use of Nazi imagery--including the Lego and Prada death camps--opened at the Jewish Museum. "For a Jewish museum to trivialize the Holocaust is outrageous and unacceptable," said Dr. Michael Schulder, a surgeon who joined about 100 protesters behind police barricades across from the museum on Manhattan's Upper East Side.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2002 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial exhibition at the Jewish Museum has made art critics out of an unlikely group: Holocaust survivors. After seeing only the catalog of the exhibition, which opens Sunday and features contemporary artworks that use Nazi imagery, some survivors' groups called for a boycott, claiming the show is repugnant and trivializes the Holocaust. For months now the New York press has been overrun with angry criticisms and passionate defenses of art few have seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1999 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, Nicolai Ouroussoff is The Times' architecture critic
To say that a building can accurately convey the full extent of the tragedy of Nazism's mass extermination of Jews would seem foolhardy. To ask an architect who has never built before to attempt such a task is to court failure. Yet Daniel Libeskind, the son of Polish-born Jews who fled Nazi and Soviet persecution before emigrating to Israel in the 1950s, was a relatively obscure academic when he won the 1989 competition to design Berlin's Jewish Museum. Libeskind came to architecture late.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2011
In an effort to call attention to its revamped film program, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art said Thursday it would stage an Art + Film Gala on Nov. 5 honoring filmmaker Clint Eastwood and artist John Baldessari. Proceeds from the fundraising event will be used to "support LACMA's initiative to make film more central to the museum's curatorial programming," the museum said, including the weekly film series it co-sponsors with Film Independent. The gala, to be held at LACMA, will be co-chaired by LACMA Trustee Eva Chow and Leonardo DiCaprio, who stars in Eastwood's latest film, "J. Edgar," which will have its world premiere at AFI Fest in Hollywood on Nov. 3. —Lee Margulies Harrison exhibit at L.A. museum The Grammy Museum in Los Angeles will mount a major exhibition on the life and music of George Harrison next month in conjunction with the forthcoming Martin Scorsese documentary with which it shares the title, "George Harrison: Living in the Material World.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2011 | By Scarlet Cheng, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Charlotte Salomon died in Auschwitz at age 26, she left behind an unperformed opera: "Life? Or Theatre?" It was in the form of 1,300 paintings — initially accompanied by overlays with words, and then, when she felt increasingly rushed, the words were written directly on the images. Sometimes they conveyed dialogue, sometimes a running narrative of a dramatic and tragic life — Charlotte's life, the names changed ever so slightly. In 1940 she had shut herself up in a hotel in the south of France, a Jewish refugee from Nazi Germany, and had produced these works in a feverish pitch of 18 months.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2010 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Architectural symbols are rarely more layered, complex or self-aware than in a Holocaust museum, where the architect's nearly impossible job is to mark murder on a mass scale while at the same time providing some sense of resilience and hope. In some cases the resulting design takes on a slashing, dissonant form, as in Daniel Libeskind's 1999 Jewish Museum in Berlin. In others it tries to communicate at least a small part of the claustrophobia and confusion that awaited prisoners inside Nazi camps; that was among the central goals of James Ingo Freed, who designed the bluntly powerful 1993 United States Holocaust Museum on the National Mall in Washington.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Seymour Fromer, who built one of the country's largest collections of Judaica with little money but enormous drive to preserve the history of Jews, especially those who helped settle the American West, has died. He was 87. Fromer died Oct. 25 at his Berkeley home following a lengthy illness, said a spokesman for the Judah L. Magnes Museum, which Fromer and his wife, Rebecca, established in 1962. The museum, housed in a historic mansion in Berkeley, contains 11,000 items, including rare manuscripts, Jewish wedding garments, Torah covers and other artifacts, many of which were gathered by the Fromers during their travels across the country and in Europe, Egypt, Morocco and India.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A foundation created by Steven Spielberg is giving $1 million to the National Museum of American Jewish History. The money from the Righteous Persons Foundation will go toward a new five-story museum building being built in Philadelphia. With the donation, officials say the museum's capital campaign has raised $111 million toward its $150-million goal. The new museum is set to open in 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2008 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
Anyone looking for signs that Daniel Libeskind's work might deepen profoundly over time, or shift in some surprising direction, has mostly been doing so in vain. After winning the master-plan competition at the ground zero site in New York in 2003, and subsequently landing commissions all over the world, he seemed content to stamp the same jagged, mournful aesthetic on each of his new buildings, whether it was a museum in Copenhagen or Denver or a condominium tower in Covington, Ky. Even as the World Trade Center rebuilding effort collapsed around him, he smiled his Hillary smile and told everybody nothing was wrong, that he was moving forward, still thrilled to have the opportunity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2004 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
Half a year after the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks, Los Angeles artist John Baldessari was trying to come up with an idea for a show of contemporary art. He asked a colleague and former student, Meg Cranston, for help. She came up with the phrase: 100 Artists See God. "Newspapers, magazines, television and radio were full of stories about God at the time, and books about God were on the bestseller list," the two wrote in the catalog for an exhibit they organized. "God was everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2006 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
Daniel Libeskind knows a little about delayed gratification. Although he made a name for himself as an architectural theorist while teaching in universities (Yale, Harvard, UCLA) he didn't actually win his first building commission until 1989, when he was 43. And it took a dozen more years and numerous struggles before that acclaimed project -- the Jewish Museum Berlin -- opened.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2006 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
One of the largest museum exhibitions on comic art ever mounted has arrived in New York, but the man behind "Maus" is not in the house. Comic artist Art Spiegelman, whose works were a big part of the show in venues elsewhere, pulled out of "Masters of American Comics" -- which opened Friday -- complaining that it has been undermined by the way curators have split its pieces between the Jewish Museum in Manhattan and the Newark Museum in New Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2006 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
Daniel Libeskind knows a little about delayed gratification. Although he made a name for himself as an architectural theorist while teaching in universities (Yale, Harvard, UCLA) he didn't actually win his first building commission until 1989, when he was 43. And it took a dozen more years and numerous struggles before that acclaimed project -- the Jewish Museum Berlin -- opened.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|