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March 16, 2002 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial exhibition at the Jewish Museum has made art critics out of an unlikely group: Holocaust survivors. After seeing only the catalog of the exhibition, which opens Sunday and features contemporary artworks that use Nazi imagery, some survivors' groups called for a boycott, claiming the show is repugnant and trivializes the Holocaust. For months now the New York press has been overrun with angry criticisms and passionate defenses of art few have seen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2002 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial exhibition at the Jewish Museum has made art critics out of an unlikely group: Holocaust survivors. After seeing only the catalog of the exhibition, which opens Sunday and features contemporary artworks that use Nazi imagery, some survivors' groups called for a boycott, claiming the show is repugnant and trivializes the Holocaust. For months now the New York press has been overrun with angry criticisms and passionate defenses of art few have seen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
"The Jewish Heritage in American Folk Art," an exploration of a facet of folk creativity organized by the Museum of Folk Art and the Jewish Museum in New York, is on view at the Hebrew Union College's Skirball Museum through April 27. The exhibition consists of about ceremonial and secular objects from 1720 to the present. The earliest generations of Sephardic and Ashkenazic Jewish settlers, few in numbers, tended to assimilate their cultural patterns with those of the local population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1996
Don Richardson, 77, director and acting teacher for 50 years. He directed three Broadway productions and more than 800 prime-time television shows. His work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Broadcasting, the Jewish Museum in New York and the UCLA Film and Television Archives. Richardson taught acting at Barnard College and the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York and California. His book, "Acting Without Agony: An Alternative to the Method," is used by teachers in several countries.
NEWS
January 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A painting believed to be a Marc Chagall work stolen last year from the Jewish Museum in New York City turned up at a postal installation in Topeka, the FBI said. Agents said the 8-by-10-inch oil is probably the French-Russian painter's "Study for 'Over Vitebsk,' " valued at about $1 million. The work was stolen after a party at the museum June 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1987 | COLIN GARDNER
Moshe Zabari is an Israeli-born master craftsman whose entire artistic output is devoted to Jewish ceremonial art and design. His current retrospective at the Hebrew Union College Skirball Museum (through Feb. 23) features work produced over the last 25 years as artist-in-residence at the Jewish Museum, New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2004 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Four Los Angeles exhibitions, including two devoted to 20th century abstract art, are among the top winners in the 2003-2004 International Association of Art Critics / USA Awards.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | JAKE DOHERTY
During the 20th Century, the struggles of African-Americans and American Jews have often intersected, producing moments of cooperation and conflict. This dynamic relationship is explored in "Bridges and Boundaries: African-Americans and American Jews," an exhibition at the California Afro-American Museum through Dec. 5.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2005 | Scott Timberg
IT'S not quite as raw as a Wild West wanted poster. But could the effect be similar? Last week the FBI announced its top 10 art crimes, which are as long-standing as the theft of Caravaggio's "Nativity With San Lorenzo and San Francesco" (stolen from Palermo, Italy, in 1969) and as recent as the thousands of antiquities looted from the Iraq National Museum and archeological sites after the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq.
NEWS
January 24, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roman Vishniac, who as a young scientist in Eastern Europe produced a poignantly powerful series of photographs that recorded the faces of fellow Jews approaching their doom, is dead. The zoologist and biologist, who later in his life concentrated on the minute life seen only through a microscope, was 92 when he died Monday in his New York City apartment of the complications of colon cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2000 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruth Bocour, an arts patron and widow of Leonard Bocour, who pioneered the development of acrylic paints, has died of cancer at her home in Santa Monica. She was 88. Bocour, who died Oct. 1, was probably best known for her work in curating the large and eclectic Bocour art collection, which traveled throughout the United States in the late 1960s and early 1970s under the auspices of the American Federation of the Arts.
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