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TRAVEL
February 9, 1997
Major exhibits of two world-class photographers, from Russia and Mexico, open this month in San Francisco and New York. "Russia in Black and White: The Photojournalism of Yevgeny Khaldei," Feb. 24 through July 17 at the Jewish Museum San Francisco, is the first West Coast showing by a man widely regarded as Russia's greatest combat photographer. It includes more than 100 photographs from the 1930s through 1960s. Khaldei, 80, worked for the Russian news agency Tass and the Pravda newspaper.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2011 | By Scarlet Cheng, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Charlotte Salomon died in Auschwitz at age 26, she left behind an unperformed opera: "Life? Or Theatre?" It was in the form of 1,300 paintings — initially accompanied by overlays with words, and then, when she felt increasingly rushed, the words were written directly on the images. Sometimes they conveyed dialogue, sometimes a running narrative of a dramatic and tragic life — Charlotte's life, the names changed ever so slightly. In 1940 she had shut herself up in a hotel in the south of France, a Jewish refugee from Nazi Germany, and had produced these works in a feverish pitch of 18 months.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2011 | By Scarlet Cheng, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Charlotte Salomon died in Auschwitz at age 26, she left behind an unperformed opera: "Life? Or Theatre?" It was in the form of 1,300 paintings — initially accompanied by overlays with words, and then, when she felt increasingly rushed, the words were written directly on the images. Sometimes they conveyed dialogue, sometimes a running narrative of a dramatic and tragic life — Charlotte's life, the names changed ever so slightly. In 1940 she had shut herself up in a hotel in the south of France, a Jewish refugee from Nazi Germany, and had produced these works in a feverish pitch of 18 months.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2008 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
Anyone looking for signs that Daniel Libeskind's work might deepen profoundly over time, or shift in some surprising direction, has mostly been doing so in vain. After winning the master-plan competition at the ground zero site in New York in 2003, and subsequently landing commissions all over the world, he seemed content to stamp the same jagged, mournful aesthetic on each of his new buildings, whether it was a museum in Copenhagen or Denver or a condominium tower in Covington, Ky. Even as the World Trade Center rebuilding effort collapsed around him, he smiled his Hillary smile and told everybody nothing was wrong, that he was moving forward, still thrilled to have the opportunity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2000 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, Nicolai Ouroussoff is The Times' architecture critic
Making great architecture is a delicate operation. It requires the ability to fuse social, contextual and structural realities into a convincing whole. It requires a clear voice and an uncensored imagination. With all of that, it is not surprising that architects often see the needs of bureaucrats and money-conscious developers as the kiss of death. Which is why the design of the Jewish Museum San Francisco, unveiled this month, is an anomaly of sorts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2006 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
Daniel Libeskind knows a little about delayed gratification. Although he made a name for himself as an architectural theorist while teaching in universities (Yale, Harvard, UCLA) he didn't actually win his first building commission until 1989, when he was 43. And it took a dozen more years and numerous struggles before that acclaimed project -- the Jewish Museum Berlin -- opened.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2008 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Architecture Critic
Anyone looking for signs that Daniel Libeskind's work might deepen profoundly over time, or shift in some surprising direction, has mostly been doing so in vain. After winning the master-plan competition at the ground zero site in New York in 2003, and subsequently landing commissions all over the world, he seemed content to stamp the same jagged, mournful aesthetic on each of his new buildings, whether it was a museum in Copenhagen or Denver or a condominium tower in Covington, Ky. Even as the World Trade Center rebuilding effort collapsed around him, he smiled his Hillary smile and told everybody nothing was wrong, that he was moving forward, still thrilled to have the opportunity.
NEWS
November 29, 2001
* Lew Christensen choreographs the San Francisco Ballet's version of "The Nutcracker," running Dec. 11 through 30. The War Memorial Opera House, 301 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, (415) 865-2000. * The "Facets of Memory" exhibition featuring photography by contemporary artists Christian Boltanski and Marcelo Brodsky runs through Jan. 31. The Jewish Museum San Francisco, 121 Steuart St., San Francisco, (415) 591-8800. * Los Lobos plays the Fillmore next Thursday and Dec. 7. 1805 Geary Blvd.
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A slug of vodka at his lips, a chunk of apple in his hand, Yevgeny Khaldei sets forth his mission. "Let them see," he says. Let them see these two bent women in a courtyard full of corpses. Let them see these lonely sailors playing with a yipping dog. Let them see the smoking cities. Let them see the ruined men. Let them see the senseless pain, and let them learn the truth of war. Such is the hope of the man who may be Russia's most celebrated combat photographer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1998 | SHAUNA SNOW
TELEVISION 'Lolita' Calls Showtime Home: Adrian Lyne's controversial remake of Vladimir Nabokov's 1954 novel "Lolita" has finally found a U.S. distributor--cable's Showtime television network. The film, starring Jeremy Irons as pedophile Humbert Humbert and actress Dominique Swain as the teenage object of his affection, will premiere on Showtime and sister network the Sundance Channel in August, with Showtime planning a 9 p.m. or later starting time.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2006 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
Daniel Libeskind knows a little about delayed gratification. Although he made a name for himself as an architectural theorist while teaching in universities (Yale, Harvard, UCLA) he didn't actually win his first building commission until 1989, when he was 43. And it took a dozen more years and numerous struggles before that acclaimed project -- the Jewish Museum Berlin -- opened.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2000 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, Nicolai Ouroussoff is The Times' architecture critic
Making great architecture is a delicate operation. It requires the ability to fuse social, contextual and structural realities into a convincing whole. It requires a clear voice and an uncensored imagination. With all of that, it is not surprising that architects often see the needs of bureaucrats and money-conscious developers as the kiss of death. Which is why the design of the Jewish Museum San Francisco, unveiled this month, is an anomaly of sorts.
TRAVEL
February 9, 1997
Major exhibits of two world-class photographers, from Russia and Mexico, open this month in San Francisco and New York. "Russia in Black and White: The Photojournalism of Yevgeny Khaldei," Feb. 24 through July 17 at the Jewish Museum San Francisco, is the first West Coast showing by a man widely regarded as Russia's greatest combat photographer. It includes more than 100 photographs from the 1930s through 1960s. Khaldei, 80, worked for the Russian news agency Tass and the Pravda newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2010 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
A beloved but sometimes forgotten center of Jewish history in the Bay Area will soon have a new home at UC Berkeley and, supporters hope, a new audience of researchers and admirers. The collection of about 10,000 objects and documents, housed until recently at the Judah L. Magnes Museum in Berkeley, tells a broad and varied history of Jewish faith and life, both on the West Coast and far afield. "There's a kind of poignancy that's in a lot of their collections, and a kind of broader perspective on what Jewish culture is," said Ron Hendel, chairman of UC Berkeley's Jewish studies program.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2010 | By Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times
In the dusty clutter of yard and estate sales, the lost heroes of Jewish American song and comedy are waiting to be reclaimed and celebrated in all their kitschy splendor. And they can't help but wonder: What's taking you so long? There's vaudeville comedienne Mae Questel, who supplied the voice of Betty Boop, and her loud-mouthed 1969 record, "Mrs. Portnoy's Retort." (Take that, Philip Roth.) On the cutting edge of liturgical singing, there's Sol Zim, who calls himself the Tom Jones of cantors.
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