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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1988 | LAURIE OCHOA
There are a lot of people who think they know a Jewish song when they hear one, but a concert presented by the Jewish Music Foundation tomorrow night might give listeners a new perspective. "Some think that cantor chants are the only clearly Jewish music," said Neal Brostoff, the foundation's artistic director. "Others have a narrower view and limit Jewish music to what is chanted when the Torah is being read. And then some say Yiddish folk songs are Jewish, nothing more."
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NEWS
April 17, 2003 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
"New Jewish Music From CalArts" was the title of the kickoff event of the Jewish Music Foundation's "Beyond Bim-Bam: New Directions in Jewish Music," a peripatetic festival of concerts and panels culminating in a UCLA Extension symposium on Jewish culture May 4. And well that these festivities should start with a collaboration between the Skirball Cultural Center and CalArts, given the latter's rich, ongoing history at or near the cutting edge of new music.
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NEWS
April 17, 2003 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
"New Jewish Music From CalArts" was the title of the kickoff event of the Jewish Music Foundation's "Beyond Bim-Bam: New Directions in Jewish Music," a peripatetic festival of concerts and panels culminating in a UCLA Extension symposium on Jewish culture May 4. And well that these festivities should start with a collaboration between the Skirball Cultural Center and CalArts, given the latter's rich, ongoing history at or near the cutting edge of new music.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1988 | LAURIE OCHOA
There are a lot of people who think they know a Jewish song when they hear one, but a concert presented by the Jewish Music Foundation tomorrow night might give listeners a new perspective. "Some think that cantor chants are the only clearly Jewish music," said Neal Brostoff, the foundation's artistic director. "Others have a narrower view and limit Jewish music to what is chanted when the Torah is being read. And then some say Yiddish folk songs are Jewish, nothing more."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1988
A retrospective of the Yiddish art songs of Lazar Weiner (1897-1982), and three chamber pieces by Weiner's son, composer Yehudi Wyner, make up the latest program by the Jewish Music Foundation, Sunday at 7:30 p.m. in Gindi Auditorium, 15600 Mulholland Drive. Pianist Wyner will assist singers Jennifer Trost and Anne Marie Ketchum; among the other participants will be violinist Mark Kashper.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
In classical music, diverse organizations support the ethnic communities' desire to participate in mainstream concert activity. A number of these groups seem to spring up every season, and then produce one or fewer public events each year. As a result, they have little visibility and no discernible continuity. But there are ongoing ethnic musical organizations with individual histories and a record of contributions to our musical life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2003 | Jon Burlingame, Special to The Times
"Der Golem," the 1920 classic of the German silent cinema, has been accompanied by several different musical scores in the past 80-plus years. Perhaps none is more appropriate for this tale of oppressed Jews in 16th century Prague than the music that will be performed with the film Monday night at the Skirball Cultural Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1987 | MARC SHULGOLD
Tonight at the Gindi Auditorium in Bel-Air, members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic will participate in "A Holocaust Memorial Concert" in observance of Yom Hashoah, a day set aside to recall that horrible chapter in Jewish history. Later this week, the Philharmonic flies to West Berlin to participate in the Berlin Festival marking the 750th birthday of that German city. The two events have much in common.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
This week, the Los Angeles Master Chorale moves from small to large. Friday and Saturday, a 16-voice contingent sang an unaccompanied French program, as part of the Nakamichi series. Next Saturday, the full 143 voices of the Chorale sing "Great Sounds of the Chorus" at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. "It's a program of big pieces," says John Currie, Master Chorale music director. "It's not full of lollipops. Come and hear choral music that has size.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1990 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Five years ago, Southern California opera lovers looked at a bare landscape--occasionally dotted with a production here or there. But now from Los Angeles to San Diego there is a choice of fare--be it the big-budget, high-profile, internationally cast attractions of Music Center Opera or the various other offerings from enterprises south of Grand Avenue. No one argues that opera hereabouts, or the population, is proliferating.
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