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February 29, 2012 | By Ricardo Lopez
A decade after Jewish journalist Daniel Pearl was killed by terrorists in Pakistan, his father, Judea Pearl, is far from worried about his son's afterlife. “I think my son feels very comfortable wherever he is,” Pearl said in a phone interview Wednesday. At least some members of the Mormon Church, however, were concerned about the spiritual fate of the Wall Street Journal reporter. They posthumously baptized Pearl last year. It's the posthumous baptism of his son -- and other Jewish people -- that worries Judea Pearl.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
It turns out there are consequences to befriending white supremacists. Especially if you're a public official. Mayor Dan Clevenger of Marionville, Mo., handed in his resignation letter Tuesday morning after an uproar among residents and in national media over remarks he made about Jewish people shortly after the April 13 shootings outside two Jewish centers near Kansas City. Clevenger, 59, is an acquaintance of Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., 73, an avowed hater of Jews who has been charged with killing three people in Overland Park in what officials have deemed a "hate crime.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1999 | CHRISTINE CASTRO
Shavuot, the Jewish festival commemorating the receiving of the Ten Commandments by Moses, will be celebrated by many Orange County congregations in coming weeks. Also known as the Feast of Weeks, Shavuot completes seven weeks from the second day of Passover and celebrates the harvest of the first fruits in ancient times. The holiday, which falls this year on May 21, also is known as Pentecost, from a Greek word for "fifty."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Whatever you might say about Simon Schama, one of our most prominent and accomplished narrative historians, you can't say he's afraid to tackle broad and challenging subjects. "The Story of the Jews" is the first of a two-volume work aimed at covering 3 millenniums, from 1000 BCE to the present day, with the break coming at 1492 and the expulsion of the Jews from Spain by Ferdinand and Isabella. That's a lot of ground to cover, greater geographically if not in chronological terms than Schama's last multi-volume work, a three-tome "History of Britain" published in 2000-02 that reached all the way back to 3500 BC. Like that work, the scale of "The Story of the Jews" was dictated by the requirement of a television documentary series, scheduled to begin airing on PBS toward the end of this month.
SCIENCE
August 7, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
North African Jews are more closely related to Jews from other parts of the world than they are to most of their non-Jewish neighbors in North Africa, a study has found. Furthermore, their DNA carries a record of their migrations over the centuries: Some bits trace back to the Middle Eastern peoples thought to have migrated to North Africa more than 2,000 years ago, while other bits are linked to Spanish and Portuguese Jews who fled to North Africa after their expulsion from the Iberian Peninsula in the late 15th century, the study's authors said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1989
I was happy to see television acknowledge Jewish people in the land of sitcoms and other series ("Being Jewish in Prime Time," Sept. 10, by Michele Willens). For too long we have watched holiday specials, some even hosted by Jewish people, with no mention of Hanukkah, and for too long has the occasional Jewish person in sitcoms been portrayed as weird, cheap or controlling an empire. NORA AMRANI Studio City
OPINION
July 29, 2012 | By Rafael Medoff
Mitt Romney's visit to Israel will generate much speculation on the role Jewish voters will play in the U.S. presidential election. His visit may also spark discussion about Mormon-Jewish relations in the wake of the recent controversy over a Mormon temple that conducted posthumous baptism ceremonies for some Holocaust victims. But another Mormon's visit to Jerusalem, 99 years ago, deserves some of the spotlight too. Because that little-known visit ultimately had a decisive impact on Jewish history and America's response to the Holocaust.
NEWS
September 23, 1992
Rabbi Mordecai I. Soloff, who served Reform Jewish congregations in Culver City and Westchester and who was known nationally for his trilogy of Jewish history, has died in Rancho Mirage. A family spokesman said he was 91 when he died Friday while on vacation with his daughter, Tamar Brower. His books, published in the 1930s and '40s, became standard texts for Reform and Conservative Jewish religious schools.
NEWS
September 9, 1985
Israeli President Chaim Herzog compared the anti-Arab campaign of the Kach Party, led by Rabbi Meir Kahane, to anti-Jewish legislation in Nazi Germany. Speaking to high school students near Tel Aviv, he said, "I think it is a disgrace to the Jewish people and to the people of Israel . . . that a man could emerge in the Jewish state with a program that is very similar to the (Nazi) Nuremberg Laws." Kahane advocates expelling Arabs from Israel.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1989
I am neither Catholic nor Jewish, and I want to say that I loved Jackie Mason's character on "Chicken Soup." My word, he was always handing out sensible advice, saving the situation and being funny at the same time! What could possibly have offended the Jewish people? Frankly, the Irish should have been offended. The program showed the Irishman in a much less attractive light. GWEN WILLSON Encino
OPINION
March 2, 2014
Re "Diplomatic lessons," Opinion, Feb. 28 Patrick Tyler suggests that Israel's demand for recognition as the state of the Jewish people is merely a tactic to block negotiations. Far from it. That recognition is as essential to peace as is the first step of declaration by an addict that he or she is addicted. Long before Israel deflected the many attempts by its neighbors to annihilate it, the core issue was and remains the fact that neighboring Islamic leaders simply cannot tolerate a Jewish administration in the Middle East.
WORLD
January 13, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli and Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Under skies dotted with scattered clouds and a blimp, Israeli and international leaders attended the state memorial ceremony held Monday for former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, who died Saturday. Draped in an Israeli flag and surrounded by wreaths, Sharon's casket lay on a raised black platform in the wide, paved plaza of the Knesset, where he served from 1973 as a lawmaker, Cabinet member and prime minister until felled by a stroke eight years ago. Israeli leaders, politicians and dignitaries in attendance, including Sharon's friends and adversaries, offered a snapshot of the country's political history.
OPINION
January 7, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
In its quest for an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement, the United States has pursued essentially the same objective over several administrations. So when Secretary of State John F. Kerry announced during his latest round of shuttle diplomacy that "we can achieve a permanent-status agreement that results in two states for two peoples if we stay focused," skepticism was understandable. Not just because the peace process has been so tragically unsuccessful over the last 15 years, but because even today, each side seems intent on thumbing its nose at the other.
OPINION
October 4, 2013
Re "Jewish secularism rising," Oct. 1 Jews are not merely a religion; Jews are a people. As a people, they have diverse backgrounds, and one can be Jewish without membership in a synagogue. However, synagogue membership helps bind one to the Jewish people. A problem for many Jews is the word "religious. " One can be a member of a synagogue and not be religious at all. Judaism's major problem today is presented in this article: what to do about women and men who marry non-Jews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2013 | By Martha Groves and Matt Stevens
In a parking lot behind a Pico Boulevard building, inside a makeshift tent of metal poles and tarps, a man in a white coat and black skullcap grabs a white-feathered hen under the wings and performs an ancient ritual. He circles the chicken in the air several times and recites a prayer for a woman standing nearby whose aim is to symbolically transfer her sins to the bird. The young man then uses a sharp blade to cut the hen's throat. In the days before Yom Kippur, the Jewish day of atonement, this ritual will be repeated untold times in hastily built plywood rooms and other structures in traditional Orthodox Jewish communities from Pico-Robertson to Brooklyn, N.Y. Promotional fliers on lampposts in the area advertise the kaparot service at $18 per chicken or $13 apiece for five or more.
NATIONAL
September 2, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Jewish Americans give to charity at higher rates than other Americans, but they donate more often to organizations that are not Jewish than to Jewish groups, a new study focusing on the Jewish community has found. The study, conducted by the philanthropic research group Jumpstart, provides new grist for Jewish charities trying to hang on to donors and recruit new ones. The biggest predictor of whether a Jewish person gave to charity, the study showed, was how connected they were to the Jewish community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2013 | By Martha Groves and Matt Stevens
In a parking lot behind a Pico Boulevard building, inside a makeshift tent of metal poles and tarps, a man in a white coat and black skullcap grabs a white-feathered hen under the wings and performs an ancient ritual. He circles the chicken in the air several times and recites a prayer for a woman standing nearby whose aim is to symbolically transfer her sins to the bird. The young man then uses a sharp blade to cut the hen's throat. In the days before Yom Kippur, the Jewish day of atonement, this ritual will be repeated untold times in hastily built plywood rooms and other structures in traditional Orthodox Jewish communities from Pico-Robertson to Brooklyn, N.Y. Promotional fliers on lampposts in the area advertise the kaparot service at $18 per chicken or $13 apiece for five or more.
NEWS
May 6, 1990
I found an April 14 skit on "Saturday Night Live" titled "Hanukkah Harry Saves Easter" to be unfunny and extremely offensive not only to the Jewish people but to Christians as well. Most "jokes" were exceedingly anti-Semitic as well as stereotypical of Christians who were portrayed as Jew haters and drunkards. The entire concept of the segment was utterly preposterous and inane. Passover and Easter are sacred in their own right and if we are going to mix the two, let's at least be funny, not irresponsible.
OPINION
August 9, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
There were a number of disturbing findings in last week's poll by the Israeli Democracy Institute and Tel Aviv University, released just as negotiators were preparing to resume Middle East peace talks in Jerusalem on Wednesday. But one less-remarked-upon point deserves further discussion: Apparently, 49% of Jewish Israelis (a narrow plurality) believe that if a final peace deal is reached at the talks and submitted to voters for their approval, Arab citizens of Israel should not be permitted to vote in the referendum.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Embattled celebrity chef Paula Deen appeared on “Today” Wednesday morning, defending herself vehemently against charges of racism and explaining her past use of the N-word. In a tearful yet defiant interview with Matt Lauer , Deen began by explaining her reasons for abruptly canceling a previously scheduled visit to “Today” last week.   “I was just overwhelmed. I was in a state of shock,” said Deen, 66. Pointing out that since Friday, Deen has lost lucrative deals with the Food Network and Smithfield Foods in connection with the matter, Lauer asked whether she believed she'd been treated fairly by her business partners.
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