Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJewish Refugees
IN THE NEWS

Jewish Refugees

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
February 6, 2014
Re "The voyage back," Feb. 3 Thanks to Robert Krakow for writing the play "The Trial of Franklin Delano Roosevelt," and to The Times for printing the article about the hundreds of European Jewish refugees in 1939 who were refused entry into Cuba and the U.S. and sent back to die in the Holocaust. This was one of America's darkest and most inhumane decisions. Perhaps we should remember "give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free" when we think of American values.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Steven Pressman
In the spring of 1939, on the eve of the Holocaust, Gilbert and Eleanor Kraus set out on a highly unlikely mission. The handsome lawyer and his stylish wife left their two young children and their comfortable home near Philadelphia's Rittenhouse Square, sailed across the Atlantic Ocean and made their way into Nazi-controlled Austria. Their goal: to rescue 50 Jewish children from Vienna and bring them to safety in the United States. The fact that the Krauses were Jewish added to the daunting challenges and long odds that stood in their way. Yet another obstacle was American attitudes and policies during the 1930s that all but shut the door to Jews trapped by the Third Reich.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The 1939 sailing of the German ship the St. Louis -- popularized in the book and movie "Voyage of the Damned" -- was a painful precursor to the Holocaust. Now, 75 years later, a November cruise will recall some of that ill-fated trip. The hopes of the 937 Jewish refugees who boarded the St. Louis in Hamburg, Germany, to flee Hitler's Nazi regime were dashed when their plan to land in Cuba and await transport to the U.S. was denied. The U.S. also didn't allow them to enter, and the ship was sent back to Europe.
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The 1939 sailing of the German ship the St. Louis -- popularized in the book and movie "Voyage of the Damned" -- was a painful precursor to the Holocaust. Now, 75 years later, a November cruise will recall some of that ill-fated trip. The hopes of the 937 Jewish refugees who boarded the St. Louis in Hamburg, Germany, to flee Hitler's Nazi regime were dashed when their plan to land in Cuba and await transport to the U.S. was denied. The U.S. also didn't allow them to enter, and the ship was sent back to Europe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1998
Re "Jews Mistreated in Swiss WWII Camps, Study Says," Jan. 13: As a Jewish refugee in Switzerland from April 1944 until the end of World War II, I was appalled to read your article. During my family's stay there we were treated courteously and with respect. Although initially our family was separated, in part to permit children to attend school, the Swiss authorities quickly arranged for all members of the family to be within the same geographic area. The only time we slept on straw was on the first night after we crossed the Alps from Italy and arrived in a remote Swiss village.
NEWS
August 31, 1995 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
History has its nodes where two just causes intersect and each becomes the other's unjust cause. "The Hiding Room," a love story shattered at one such intersection, begins in wartime Cairo in 1941. The British were hard pressed by the advancing forces of Rommel, and Jewish refugees from Europe were trying to evade British controls to reach Palestine. The British were in a close-to-desperate position.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2014 | By Nita Lelyveld
Painful memories have the power to surface fresh and raw, even after many years. A great-grandmother once again can become a terrified little girl. A grandfather surrounded by friends and family can feel all alone in a vicious world. So it was at the Los Angeles Jewish Home in Reseda the other afternoon, when the drama club put on a play. The audience was made up almost entirely of octogenarians and nonagenarians. The cast ranged in age from 85 to 92. The performance understandably didn't rely on action.
BOOKS
August 31, 1986
I am engaged in research into the contribution of the Portuguese toward helping Jewish refugees during World War II and should be most interested to hear from any of your readers with information or personal recollections of organizations or individuals, such as Aristides Mendes, who gave assistance to those fleeing from the Nazis. P. NEWMAN Department of Spanish and Portuguese The University of Leeds Leeds, England, LS2 9JT
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Switzerland on Tuesday said a U.S. historian's report accusing it of having discriminated against wartime Jewish refugees by locking them up in labor camps and subjecting them to a special tax was insulting, simplistic and laced with errors. "Any former refugees who were in Swiss camps today express gratitude toward Switzerland for the fact that they survived the war because they were accepted in Switzerland," said Linda Shepard, an official spokeswoman in Bern, the Swiss capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1998
After World War II, 100,000 Jewish refugees displaced by the Holocaust sought a new home in Palesine, hoping to join a large and well-established Jewish population in that area. But Arabs in British-ruled Palestine resisted having so many Jews enter the country. The United Nations eventualy proposed splitting the country, and in 1948, Israel declared its independence. The creation of this country was fraught with conflict that continues to this day.
OPINION
February 6, 2014
Re "The voyage back," Feb. 3 Thanks to Robert Krakow for writing the play "The Trial of Franklin Delano Roosevelt," and to The Times for printing the article about the hundreds of European Jewish refugees in 1939 who were refused entry into Cuba and the U.S. and sent back to die in the Holocaust. This was one of America's darkest and most inhumane decisions. Perhaps we should remember "give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free" when we think of American values.
OPINION
February 6, 2014
Re "Locos no longer locals," Feb. 4 As The Times notes in its article about gentrification and gangs in Echo Park, L.A. City Atty. Mike Feuer did address the Greater Echo Park Elysian Neighborhood Council (of which I am a member) on the subject of supporting a gang injunction. What the article doesn't report is that the council voted against the injunction. Seeing this as an attempt by developers to market the community as "hipster ready" to potential buyers, the council was convinced that the injunction promised great harm, including racial profiling and guilty-by-association policing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2014 | By Nita Lelyveld
Painful memories have the power to surface fresh and raw, even after many years. A great-grandmother once again can become a terrified little girl. A grandfather surrounded by friends and family can feel all alone in a vicious world. So it was at the Los Angeles Jewish Home in Reseda the other afternoon, when the drama club put on a play. The audience was made up almost entirely of octogenarians and nonagenarians. The cast ranged in age from 85 to 92. The performance understandably didn't rely on action.
OPINION
April 13, 2013
Responding to Rafael Medoff's Op-Ed article Sunday detailing FDR's reaction to Jews facing persecution in Nazi Germany, reader Robert Ouriel wrote in a letter published Friday that "as an American and a Jew, I found [Medoff's] criticism of Franklin D. Roosevelt for his private comments about Jews most unfair. " He continued: "In singling out FDR, Medoff also ignores the squeamishness of America's modern presidents in dealing with genocide. Jimmy Carter, a human rights crusader, did nothing to prevent Pol Pot from exterminating as much as 20% of Cambodia's population.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Although it runs just under an hour, the gripping documentary "Rescue in the Philippines: Refuge From the Holocaust" proves a thorough look at a lesser-known chapter in Holocaust-era history. Credited to the writing-producing team of Russell Hodge, Cynthia Scott and Terry Irving (they jointly run TV company 3 Roads Communications), the film lays out, in clear, chronological order, how the former U.S. colony of the Philippines became a sanctuary for more than 1,200 Jews escaping Nazi tyranny when other countries shut their doors.
OPINION
August 23, 2012 | By Rafael Medoff
One does not usually think of the conventions of the major U.S. political parties as having any particular impact on Jewish history. But 68 years ago, the Republican National Convention adopted a plank that would shape the future of U.S.-Israel relations and redefine the role of Jewish voters in American politics. This surprising turn of events was the result of efforts by an unlikely trio: a former president, a maverick journalist-turned-congresswoman and the father of Israel's current prime minister.
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The Swiss government promised to pay more than $800,000 to two Holocaust groups, in a gesture sought by Jewish organizations after Switzerland apologized last year for turning back refugees from Nazi terror. The Cabinet decision came as pressure mounted on Swiss banks to pay back Nazi wealth and Jewish accounts left ownerless by Holocaust victims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2005 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
A musical event Friday night to commemorate the end of World War II 60 years ago focused on a Jewish family and their tale of fleeing from Nazi Germany to China, a seemingly unlikely haven then under Japanese occupation. "China was the only country that would accept us," Rita Atterman Feder told 1,200 people -- most of them Chinese Americans -- who attended the concert at the San Gabriel Civic Auditorium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Henry Ries, whose photographs of a battered postwar Germany documented the struggle of people trying to regain life's normalcy, has died. He was 86. Ries died Monday at his home in Ghent, N.Y. The cause of death was not announced. A Berlin-born Jew who fled Hitler in 1938, Ries returned to Germany after the war and often used images of mundane life to contrast the darkness of war's aftermath. Much of his work appeared in the New York Times.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|