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OPINION
August 14, 2013
Re "Will Israel's Arabs get a say in its future?," Editorial, Aug. 12 Your editorial regarding whether Israel's Arab minority would be allowed to participate in a vote on a possible peace deal with the Palestinians goes right to the heart of the threat facing Israel. The Palestinians have long wanted the millions of descendants of refugees from the 1948 war to move back to Israel and to become citizens of the Jewish state. This of course would inevitably result in the Jews becoming a minority and would mean the end of Israel as a Jewish state.
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OPINION
March 2, 2014
Re "Diplomatic lessons," Opinion, Feb. 28 Patrick Tyler suggests that Israel's demand for recognition as the state of the Jewish people is merely a tactic to block negotiations. Far from it. That recognition is as essential to peace as is the first step of declaration by an addict that he or she is addicted. Long before Israel deflected the many attempts by its neighbors to annihilate it, the core issue was and remains the fact that neighboring Islamic leaders simply cannot tolerate a Jewish administration in the Middle East.
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NEWS
July 6, 1997
Marjorie Miller (in "Home at Last," June 30) writes that Joel and Donna Zeff and their family "left Los Angeles for Israel in 1994 for the same reason millions of Jews from around the world have migrated to the Middle East in the last half century: to take part in what Joel Zeff calls 'the greatest Jewish adventure in 2,000 years'--the building of a Jewish state." In fact, it is well known that the vast majority of immigrants to Israel were spurred not by ideological conviction but by political or economic necessity.
OPINION
February 28, 2014 | By Patrick Tyler
Israelis and Palestinians are facing their most difficult negotiation since Menachem Begin flew west to face Egyptian President Anwar Sadat a generation ago at Camp David. If Israel were to end its long occupation, if Palestinians were to unite and forswear violence, if two states were able to share an eternal capital in Jerusalem and bind up the wounds of their long enmity, then a viable Palestinian state could emerge to live in peace with its most prominent and powerful neighbor. Sadly, the final hurdles that diplomats, chief among them Secretary of State John F. Kerry, face in organizing a new negotiation are shaped by preconditions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1988 | DOMINIQUE MOISI, Dominique Moisi is the associate director of the French Institute for International Relations in Paris and the editor of the journal Politique Etrangere.
The events of the last six weeks in Israel's occupied territories have shed new light on the existential dilemma of the Jewish state, for Israel is at the same time more and less of a state than any ordinary nation in the world.
OPINION
October 10, 2004
The second intifada, or Palestinian war on Israel, is 4 years old. Although it has featured guns and suicide bombs, it has failed just like the first intifada, in 1987-93, which featured rocks and Molotov cocktails. For every dead Israeli, there are three dead Palestinians. Thousands have been injured. Thousands more have been turned into refugees by Israel's unsubtle policy of avenging suicide bombs by destroying the houses of the bombers' relatives.
OPINION
October 14, 2003
Re " 'Jewish State' Has Become an Anachronism," Commentary, Oct. 10: As a Jewish refugee from Iran, I read with amusement Tony Judt's opinion that the "Jewish" state is anachronistic. For thousands of years, Jews have self-described themselves as "Am-Israel," or the People of Israel, but Judt has now decided that the Jews are not entitled to their own state because of its effect on non-Jews. Perhaps he also thinks that the U.S. should not exist because it might discriminate against noncitizens.
OPINION
October 10, 2003 | Tony Judt, Tony Judt is a professor of history and director of the Remarque Institute at New York University. A longer version of this essay appears in the current New York Review of Books.
At the dawn of the 20th century, in the twilight of the continental empires, Europe's subject peoples dreamed of forming "nation-states," territorial homelands where Poles, Czechs, Serbs, Armenians and others might live free, masters of their own fate. When the Hapsburg and Romanov empires collapsed after World War I, a flurry of new states did emerge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1990 | DENNIS PRAGER, Dennis Prager is co-author of "The Nine Questions People Ask About Judaism" and of "Why the Jews? The Reason for Anti-Semitism" (Simon & Schuster)
This past week thousands of Palestinian Arabs who fervently want Israel extinguished rained stones on Jews worshiping at the Western Wall. Israeli police responded with tear gas, with rubber bullets, and finally with live ammunition, and 19 Palestinians died. Then the U.N. Security Council condemned Israel for the "excessive" response. The only effect on Israel will be to further embitter its peace movement, for the condemnation gives new meaning to the word hypocrisy.
OPINION
May 11, 2008 | Benny Morris, Benny Morris is the author of many books about the Israeli-Arab conflict, including, most recently, "1948: A History of the First Arab-Israeli War."
Israel at 60 is a sad place. It is sad despite the prosperity that is apparent at every turn. By most Western political and economic standards, the country is a phenomenal success story. It is one of the few states created after World War II to have emerged and remained a functioning, indeed vibrant, democracy; its citizens, including its Arab citizens (1.
OPINION
January 7, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
In its quest for an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement, the United States has pursued essentially the same objective over several administrations. So when Secretary of State John F. Kerry announced during his latest round of shuttle diplomacy that "we can achieve a permanent-status agreement that results in two states for two peoples if we stay focused," skepticism was understandable. Not just because the peace process has been so tragically unsuccessful over the last 15 years, but because even today, each side seems intent on thumbing its nose at the other.
OPINION
November 21, 2013 | By Michael Oren
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has been labeled a warmonger, a wolf-crier and an opponent of peace at any price because of his policies on Iran. Here's what Netanyahu's critics say: His warnings of a bad deal are designed to undermine measures to slow Iran's nuclear program and test its openness to long-term solutions. His insistence on strengthening, rather than easing, sanctions will weaken Iranian moderates and drive them from the negotiating table - precisely what Netanyahu allegedly wants.
OPINION
October 1, 2013 | By Neve Gordon
In the 2012 elections, J Street, the relatively new pro-Israel lobby whose stated purpose is to promote a progressive peace agenda in the Middle East, says its PAC disbursed more than $1.8 million to candidates from 26 states, thus helping eight Senate and 63 House hopefuls win their races. Among the winners are the chairs and ranking members of five committees, including the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and the House Armed Services Committee, as well as chairs and ranking members of more than 30 subcommittees.
OPINION
August 14, 2013
Re "Will Israel's Arabs get a say in its future?," Editorial, Aug. 12 Your editorial regarding whether Israel's Arab minority would be allowed to participate in a vote on a possible peace deal with the Palestinians goes right to the heart of the threat facing Israel. The Palestinians have long wanted the millions of descendants of refugees from the 1948 war to move back to Israel and to become citizens of the Jewish state. This of course would inevitably result in the Jews becoming a minority and would mean the end of Israel as a Jewish state.
OPINION
August 9, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
There were a number of disturbing findings in last week's poll by the Israeli Democracy Institute and Tel Aviv University, released just as negotiators were preparing to resume Middle East peace talks in Jerusalem on Wednesday. But one less-remarked-upon point deserves further discussion: Apparently, 49% of Jewish Israelis (a narrow plurality) believe that if a final peace deal is reached at the talks and submitted to voters for their approval, Arab citizens of Israel should not be permitted to vote in the referendum.
WORLD
June 3, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON  - Secretary of State John F. Kerry on Monday said Israelis and Palestinians should support the two-state peace initiative he is championing to achieve their aspirations and security goals. Kerry, appearing before the American Jewish Committee in Washington, called for Israel to accept the risk of a peace deal with Palestinians because the consequences of not doing so would be worse. “Israel will be left to choose between being a Jewish state or a democratic state, but it will not be able to fulfill the founders' visions of being both at once,” he said.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY and CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Israel declared a formal state of national emergency early today, shortly after the United States launched air strikes against Iraq. But by dawn, the Jewish state had not been attacked by Iraq despite President Saddam Hussein's threat to do so, and a senior Israeli general told Israel Radio: "The more time passes without missiles hitting Israel, the more the chances of that happening--happily--approach zero." Israeli army sources reported early today that U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1994 | LOUIS RENE BERES, Louis Rene Beres is a professor of political science and international law at Purdue University.
Even by the standards of Kafka's uncannily prophetic insights, the parable of the vulture is remarkable. Examined as a lesson for Israel in its protracted struggle for survival in the Middle East, the tale is right on the mark. Indeed, it reads as if it were written originally with no other struggle in mind. Consider the scenario. A man is being destroyed, slowly and painfully, by a fierce and predatory bird.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Given perceptions that he is antagonistic toward Israel,  it isn't surprising that President Obama opened his visit to that country with an effusive tribute to his hosts.  Obama took special pains to disarm criticism  that he had portrayed the establishment of the State of Israel as compensation for the  Nazi Holocaust, rather than the fulfillment of the Jewish people's dream of re-creating  a state in their ancestral territory.  (Never mind...
OPINION
March 12, 2013
Re "The Israel trip," Opinion, March 8 Ami Ayalon's suggestions to President Obama as he prepares for his trip to Israel make the assumption that the United States should continue in its role as mediator between the Israelis and the Palestinians. Obama has shown his clear bias toward Israel in many ways. He came out against the Goldstone Report, a United Nations investigation into the Israeli incursion into the Gaza Strip in 2008; he never condemned the Israeli attack on the Mavi Marmara and the killing of a U.S. citizen by an Israeli commando; he blocked a Palestinian bid for U.N. observer status; and he has retreated from earlier demands of a settlement freeze on Palestinian lands.
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