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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The professor at Valley College, with his long gray hair and beard, reminded student Mary Jackson of the biblical "Ancient of Days" sitting on his heavenly throne. Another admiring student compared his appearance to none other than Noah. But it's not only his resemblance to a Hebrew sage that brings distinction to 54-year-old professor Zev Garber.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Geza Vermes was a graduate student in Belgium in the late 1940s when he was captivated by news sweeping the globe about a remarkable discovery in the desert east of Jerusalem. He quickly switched gears, penning his doctoral thesis on the Dead Sea Scrolls, the ancient manuscript fragments that would become a focus of his life's work. FOR THE RECORD: The headline on an earlier version of this article said Vermes had died at the age of 89. He was 88. Also in the earlier version, the first name of Mark Goodacre, an associate professor of religion at Duke University, was incorrectly reported as Martin.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The Vatican will close its institute for Jewish studies in Jerusalem and transfer the program to a similar center at the Jesuit-run Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. A statement in the Vatican newspaper L'Osservatore Romano made no reference to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but cited "increasing financial problems of several years' standing." It also said the move would give the Jewish studies program greater stability and visibility, and permit it to offer an academic degree.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
Inspiration can come from anywhere. Even a cardboard box company. In 1950, the Container Corp. of America launched an advertising campaign called "Great Ideas of Western Man. " The series, which ran for three decades, paired quotes from leaders in philosophy, science and politics with artwork from modern artists. A new exhibition at the Skirball Cultural Center uses the same technique but focuses on Jewish artists and phrases. "Voices & Visions" features 18 posters inspired by quotations from Jewish authors and scholars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1992 | SAM ENRIQUEZ
A writer for such television shows as "All in the Family" and "The Jeffersons" has given $35,000 to the Jewish studies program at Cal State Northridge--enough money to restore four of five classes canceled this fall because of state budget cuts, school officials said Tuesday. Michael Ross, a resident of Los Angeles, gave the money after reading in a Jewish newspaper that the CSUN program would lose its part-time instructors, unless it received private donations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
After long resisting religion-based academic majors, Johns Hopkins University announced this week that it is establishing a Jewish studies program with the help of a $5-million gift from a Baltimore foundation. The $5-million gift from the Leonard and Helen R. Stulman Charitable Foundation will support new course offerings, additional faculty and public lectures, said foundation president Shale D. Stiller .
NEWS
October 26, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The first center of Jewish studies here in more than half a century will open early next year as part of a new academy of world civilizations, the project's organizers announced Tuesday. Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, a leading scholar of modern Judaism from Jerusalem, said the center will train "a new generation of rabbis in Russia" and conduct research in the vast historical archives on Judaism in Soviet libraries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
The Jewish Studies program at Cal State Northridge has received two gifts from private donors totaling $14,000. The money will enable the program to develop new courses and hire instructors for specialized lessons, college officials said. TV comedy writer Mickey Ross and his wife, Irene, donated $10,000, and an anonymous donor gave $4,000, said Jody Myers, coordinator of the program. Myers said the donations will help the program grow and develop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN
The Brandeis-Bardin Institute, a center for Jewish studies, will open its 3,100-acre grounds in Simi Valley to the public Sunday for tree-planting ceremonies and other outdoor activities. The institute will conduct its 41st annual Shlomo Bardin Festival of the Trees. The event was named for the center's co-founder, who established the spring celebration in 1952.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The professor at Los Angeles Valley College, with his long gray hair and beard, reminded student Mary Jackson of the biblical "Ancient of Days" sitting on his heavenly throne. Another admiring student compared his appearance to none other than Noah. But it is not only his resemblance to a Hebrew sage that brings distinction to 54-year-old professor Zev Garber.
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | By Karin Klein
They're almost as much a part of Hanukkah as potato pancakes, the foil-wrapped chocolate candies called gelt that usually come in plastic-mesh bags at the checkout stand and taste pretty much like the leftover wax from the candles in the menorah. Embossed with designs, they're meant to represent the coins that once were given to children as an encouragement for their Jewish studies. (As with most Jewish traditions, there are multiple explanations for the tradition.) In other words, they don't taste very good, and at a time when Hostess cupcakes are headed toward possible extinction, perhaps it makes sense that another low-quality sweet from the nostalgia banks of baby boomers is undergoing an upscale -- and ethical -- makeover.
WORLD
September 18, 2012 | Barbara Demick
The family always knew there was something mysterious about Wang Fanglian, secrets he dared not share with even his closest relatives. Although he was just an ordinary worker at a diesel engine factory, he spoke four languages, among them English with a guttural German accent. His narrow brick-faced house had a flush toilet, a gas stove and a balcony for drying clothes, all strange luxuries in his rickshaw-wide Shanghai alley. Only late in life did Wang explain himself, when it was safe to talk about his friendships with Jews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2011
Dave Duerson NFL player on Super Bowl-winning teams Dave Duerson, 50, a four-time Pro Bowl safety who played on Super Bowl winners with the Chicago Bears and New York Giants, was found dead Thursday at his home in Sunny Isles Beach, Fla. Investigators have not determined the cause of death. The Bears released a statement Friday saying they were "stunned and saddened" by the news and called Duerson "a great contributor to our team and the Chicago community. " Born Nov. 28, 1960, in Muncie, Ind., Duerson was a four-year starter at Notre Dame, where he also earned a bachelor's degree in economics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2009 | Valerie J. Nelson
Michael "Mickey" Ross, a writer-producer who reveled in speaking Yiddish and pushing society's buttons on the popular television sitcoms "All in the Family," "The Jeffersons" and "Three's Company," has died. He was 89. Ross, who lived in West Hollywood, died Tuesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of complications from a stroke and heart attack, said Carol Summers, a friend and former colleague.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2007 | Tami Abdollah, Times Staff Writer
For a group that traditionally has viewed the counting of its members with ambivalence, the Jewish community is devoting a great deal of scrutiny and debate to population surveys. Take, for example, the discussion generated by the recent publication of a study by Brandeis University that estimated the U.S. Jewish population at 6 million to 6.4 million, roughly 1 million larger than thought.
OPINION
February 5, 2007 | Paul M. Barrett, PAUL M. BARRETT is the author of "American Islam: The Struggle for the Soul of a Religion."
'DID THEY KNOW you were Jewish?" I often hear that question when people learn I've spent four years researching and writing a book about American Muslims. The answer is yes, and rather than hinder my reporting, disclosure usually helped. For one thing, the differing reactions I got underscored a central point of my book: American Muslims are anything but monolithic. Shiite Iraqi immigrants who originally supported the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2002 | WILLIAM LOBDELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 18 months since being named director of UCLA's small Jewish studies program, Kenneth Reinhard has led an impressive retooling designed to bring the isolated academic niche into the scholarly mainstream. He's successfully pushed for a reduction in the undergraduate requirements for Hebrew, added courses that explore the impact of Jewish culture on secular life, and developed new emphases for undergraduate majors, including Jewish law, American Jewish studies and Israel studies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1992 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
When Cal State Northridge's Jewish Studies Program was in danger of losing more than half of its fall classes to state budget cutbacks, Hollywood came to the rescue. Michael (Mickey) Ross, a writer-producer who helped develop television's "The Jeffersons" and "Three's Company," and his wife, Irene, donated $35,000 to the ailing program. "I was born of immigrant parents," said Ross, who read about the program's plight in a Jewish newspaper. "I loved their attitude, their ways, their morals.
WORLD
September 15, 2006 | From the Associated Press
This nation ordained its first rabbis since World War II on Thursday, an event hailed as a milestone for the rebirth of Jewish life in the country responsible for the Holocaust. The three men received their ordination certificates at a ceremony in Dresden's modern stone synagogue, which was rebuilt after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Daniel Alter, 47, of Germany was the first of the three to graduate from Abraham Geiger College at the University of Potsdam.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2005 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
Jewish voters remained overwhelmingly Democratic in the 2004 presidential election, but President Bush made inroads with those who attend religious services most often, according to a study to be released today. The study by a think tank associated with the National Jewish Democratic Council mostly confirmed the initial impression from exit polls in November that found little movement toward Bush among American Jews.
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