Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJews Argentina
IN THE NEWS

Jews Argentina

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 17, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tipster surfaced a week before the terrorist bomb destroyed a Jewish community center here in 1994 and killed 86 people, the bloodiest anti-Semitic attack ever in the Americas. His name was Wilson Dos Santos. He was a frightened Brazilian who talked his way into the Argentine Consulate in Milan, Italy, with a wild story to tell. He was 38, lean and dapper. He had green eyes, and he was missing the four fingers of his right hand.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Pakistani man who Argentine sources say is wanted for questioning in the bombings of the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires in 1992 and of a Jewish cultural center there in 1994 is in custody in Los Angeles, Immigration and Naturalization Service officials said Monday. INS spokeswoman Nancy Cohen said Mohammad Abass Malik was arrested on grounds that he was in the United States without proper documentation. The 1994 bombing killed 86 people, and 29 died in the embassy blast.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is with pain that 92-year-old Samuel Rollansky thinks of rebuilding. The bomb that ripped through the heart of Argentina's Jewish community not only killed almost 100 people--it also destroyed Rollansky's lifework, one of the world's most precious collections of Jewish historical books and papers. "As Jews, we are accustomed to having to start over," he said quietly, cradling a volume of "Master Works of Yiddish Literature," which he published more than 30 years ago. "It is an obligation.
NEWS
April 17, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The tipster surfaced a week before the terrorist bomb destroyed a Jewish community center here in 1994 and killed 86 people, the bloodiest anti-Semitic attack ever in the Americas. His name was Wilson Dos Santos. He was a frightened Brazilian who talked his way into the Argentine Consulate in Milan, Italy, with a wild story to tell. He was 38, lean and dapper. He had green eyes, and he was missing the four fingers of his right hand.
NEWS
July 16, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities investigating the bombing of a Jewish community center in 1994 were interrogating Monday more than a dozen police officers suspected of links to the terrorist attack. The arrests of several high-ranking commanders and other officers of the Buenos Aires provincial police came days before Thursday's two-year anniversary of the bombing that killed 87 people, the deadliest anti-Semitic attack outside Israel since World War II.
NEWS
October 16, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three years after a terrorist bomb killed his daughter and 85 others in one of the bloodiest anti-Semitic attacks since the Holocaust, Luis Czyzewski is still hunting for justice. Today he will ask the help of the most powerful leader in the world. The Argentine accountant has already told his story to foreign leaders: During U.S.
NEWS
July 19, 1996 | From Reuters
Hundreds of Argentine Jews held a tearful memorial Thursday for victims of a bomb attack on their main community center two years ago and criticized authorities for failing to find the culprits. "Two years after the attack, here we are again asking for justice with all the indignation and the pain," said Norma Lew, the mother of one of the 87 people killed in the car-bomb attack on the community center. "But our plea for justice remains as strong as ever."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Pakistani man who Argentine sources say is wanted for questioning in the bombings of the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires in 1992 and of a Jewish cultural center there in 1994 is in custody in Los Angeles, Immigration and Naturalization Service officials said Monday. INS spokeswoman Nancy Cohen said Mohammad Abass Malik was arrested on grounds that he was in the United States without proper documentation. The 1994 bombing killed 86 people, and 29 died in the embassy blast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1994 | BOB POOL
Standing shoulder to shoulder at a memorial to Jewish victims of terrorism, diplomats from Argentina and Israel vowed Thursday in Los Angeles to find those responsible for this week's bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires that killed more than 45 people. "We hope the truth comes very soon," said Luis Maria Riccheri, consul general for Argentina. "Argentina needs that. The world needs it."
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Diplomatic relations between Argentina and Iran were strained to the breaking point Thursday after the Buenos Aires government received evidence that implicates Iranian officials in the bombing of a Jewish community center that killed nearly 100 people. "If the evidence is proven true, it leads right to the Iranian Embassy" in Buenos Aires, a well-placed Argentine government source said.
NEWS
October 16, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three years after a terrorist bomb killed his daughter and 85 others in one of the bloodiest anti-Semitic attacks since the Holocaust, Luis Czyzewski is still hunting for justice. Today he will ask the help of the most powerful leader in the world. The Argentine accountant has already told his story to foreign leaders: During U.S.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raising anew the specter of anti-Semitism in Argentina's security forces, authorities on Wednesday charged three police officials and a former detective as accomplices in the lethal bombing of a Jewish community center here in 1994.
NEWS
July 19, 1996 | From Reuters
Hundreds of Argentine Jews held a tearful memorial Thursday for victims of a bomb attack on their main community center two years ago and criticized authorities for failing to find the culprits. "Two years after the attack, here we are again asking for justice with all the indignation and the pain," said Norma Lew, the mother of one of the 87 people killed in the car-bomb attack on the community center. "But our plea for justice remains as strong as ever."
NEWS
July 16, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Authorities investigating the bombing of a Jewish community center in 1994 were interrogating Monday more than a dozen police officers suspected of links to the terrorist attack. The arrests of several high-ranking commanders and other officers of the Buenos Aires provincial police came days before Thursday's two-year anniversary of the bombing that killed 87 people, the deadliest anti-Semitic attack outside Israel since World War II.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is with pain that 92-year-old Samuel Rollansky thinks of rebuilding. The bomb that ripped through the heart of Argentina's Jewish community not only killed almost 100 people--it also destroyed Rollansky's lifework, one of the world's most precious collections of Jewish historical books and papers. "As Jews, we are accustomed to having to start over," he said quietly, cradling a volume of "Master Works of Yiddish Literature," which he published more than 30 years ago. "It is an obligation.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Diplomatic relations between Argentina and Iran were strained to the breaking point Thursday after the Buenos Aires government received evidence that implicates Iranian officials in the bombing of a Jewish community center that killed nearly 100 people. "If the evidence is proven true, it leads right to the Iranian Embassy" in Buenos Aires, a well-placed Argentine government source said.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raising anew the specter of anti-Semitism in Argentina's security forces, authorities on Wednesday charged three police officials and a former detective as accomplices in the lethal bombing of a Jewish community center here in 1994.
NEWS
November 29, 1987 | RANDALL HACKLEY, Associated Press
Item: A synagogue is bombed hours after the arrest of an alleged Nazi war criminal. Item: The bodies of two Jewish businessmen kidnaped for ransom by rogue federal police officers are found buried in a grove outside Buenos Aires. Since assuming power four years ago from a rightist military regime, the civilian government of President Raul Alfonsin has tried to overcome Argentina's reputation as a haven for Nazis and home of anti-Semites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1994 | BOB POOL
Standing shoulder to shoulder at a memorial to Jewish victims of terrorism, diplomats from Argentina and Israel vowed Thursday in Los Angeles to find those responsible for this week's bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires that killed more than 45 people. "We hope the truth comes very soon," said Luis Maria Riccheri, consul general for Argentina. "Argentina needs that. The world needs it."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|