Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJews Central Europe
IN THE NEWS

Jews Central Europe

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 26, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hand of fate that twice reached out to shield Yevgenia Grinberg from Nazi firing squads may once again be visible in the twilight of a life that has been lapped by waves of cruelty and kindness. Alone in a one-room apartment and living on $60 a month, the 64-year-old retired scientist has just been promised compensation for her World War II suffering by the German government, which will pay her and other Holocaust survivors $140 a month.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 26, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hand of fate that twice reached out to shield Yevgenia Grinberg from Nazi firing squads may once again be visible in the twilight of a life that has been lapped by waves of cruelty and kindness. Alone in a one-room apartment and living on $60 a month, the 64-year-old retired scientist has just been promised compensation for her World War II suffering by the German government, which will pay her and other Holocaust survivors $140 a month.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
Storm-tossed in the Caribbean and captured by pirates, 23 Jews fleeing oppression in Brazil eventually landed in 1654 in what is now New York and formed America's first Jewish congregation. Descended from survivors of the Spanish Inquisition, these pioneer American Jews called themselves the "remnant of Israel"--in Hebrew, Shearith Israel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1995 | EDWARD SEROTTA, Edward Serotta is a Berlin-based documentary photographer and author of the forthcoming book, "Survival in Sarajevo."
Before 1991, Ivan Ceresnjes and Jacob Finci were among Sarajevo's professional elite. These 40ish men spent their boyhoods growing up around the Jewish community center not far from the old Turkish quarter. After college, Ceresnjes became a successful architect and Finci was one of Bosnia's leading corporate attorneys. They had large families, roomy apartments and vacation homes at the beach. But as Sarajevo Jews, they were born in the shadow of history.
NEWS
May 15, 1985 | JACK SMITH
In writing the other day about a walking tour of the splendid old financial palaces on Spring Street, I noted that the city's first "skyscraper," the Hellman Building at 4th and Spring, had been built in 1905 by Herman W. Hellman, "a pioneer Jewish merchant and banker from Bavaria." That description of Hellman provoked a colleague into writing my editor the following memo: "In Jack Smith's column he referred to a Jewish pioneer businessman.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1997 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A quick scan of Fred Zinnemann's resume tells you all you need to know. His was the name on a whole bunch of memorable movies. He was the maestro who directed "High Noon," widely considered the greatest western ever; "From Here to Eternity," one of Hollywood's finest war films; and "A Man for All Seasons," one of cinema's most lauded historical dramas. He won best director Oscars for the latter two films. The second rank includes "The Day of the Jackal," "Julia" and "Oklahoma!"
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
It was the worst of wars. Launched by a satanic, Austrian-born psychopath onto an ill-prepared world, World War II claimed 53 million lives, decimated great centers of civilization and fueled the assembly-line mass murder of European Jewry before finally ending six years later in the first atomic mushroom clouds. It exposed a frightening new darkness to the human soul, yet it remains the last great triumph of good over evil.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|