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NEWS
July 15, 1997 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ingrid Wilmot of Palos Verdes stopped eating apple cores just a few years ago. She had picked up the habit as a girl in this freewheeling treaty port during World War II, when food and dignity were scarce among the Jews who fled to China from the Nazi juggernaut in Europe. They came by the thousands to the only city on Earth that would accept them without passports or visas--no questions asked. Shanghai, den of vice and iniquity, opium addicts and imperialists, was their improbable haven.
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WORLD
September 21, 2004 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
Esther and Paul Agran look over Harbin's rather dowdy Xinyang Square, see the mud and the snarled traffic, then count the buildings from the corner. "One, two, three -- that's it!" says Esther, 80. "That's the building where we had our wedding reception! It was a beautiful building. I think it rubbed off -- we've been together 56 years."
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NEWS
August 14, 1993 | Reuters
The Chinese city of Kaifeng has launched an international fund-raising drive to help it preserve a unique Jewish heritage that dates from before the time of Italian explorer Marco Polo. Kaifeng, in central Henan province, is seeking to rebuild a 17th-Century synagogue and collect research documents on a Jewish community that thrived 1,000 years ago on the Chinese side of the ancient Silk Road trading route.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2000 | Associated Press
Chinese authorities have reopened a Jewish cemetery originally built by Jews who moved to northeast China after the completion of the Trans-Siberian railway a century ago, the state-run New China News Agency said Monday. Workers cleaned up the cemetery in Harbin, near the border with Russia in northeastern China, and placed flowers on each tomb before China's traditional grave-sweeping festival, which was observed Tuesday, the news agency said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2000 | Associated Press
Chinese authorities have reopened a Jewish cemetery originally built by Jews who moved to northeast China after the completion of the Trans-Siberian railway a century ago, the state-run New China News Agency said Monday. Workers cleaned up the cemetery in Harbin, near the border with Russia in northeastern China, and placed flowers on each tomb before China's traditional grave-sweeping festival, which was observed Tuesday, the news agency said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1993
I am visiting here from my home in Beijing, and a news item in The Times (Aug. 14) concerning the Jewish community in Kaifeng, China, a millennium ago, recently came to my attention. It says that "few are able to explain how the group made its way from ancient Judea to central China." The fact is that over the past 300 years several Western and Chinese historians, based in part on records inscribed in stone by the Jews themselves, have described their route. To those interested in learning the details, I immodestly recommend a book I edited and compiled, "Jews in Old China: Studies by Chinese Scholars" (Hippocrene, New York, 1984)
WORLD
September 21, 2004 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
Esther and Paul Agran look over Harbin's rather dowdy Xinyang Square, see the mud and the snarled traffic, then count the buildings from the corner. "One, two, three -- that's it!" says Esther, 80. "That's the building where we had our wedding reception! It was a beautiful building. I think it rubbed off -- we've been together 56 years."
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | CHARLENE L. FU, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When residents of North and South Scripture Lane see a foreigner wandering down their alley, they can guess why. "Are you looking for descendants of the Jews?" asked an old man sitting beside the dirt lane in his undershirt, and told the visitor about Li, who lives a few streets away. He waved a hand toward where Zhao lives, but would not take the stranger there. "He's not accepting visitors anymore," the old man said. "He's had too many."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2005 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
A musical event Friday night to commemorate the end of World War II 60 years ago focused on a Jewish family and their tale of fleeing from Nazi Germany to China, a seemingly unlikely haven then under Japanese occupation. "China was the only country that would accept us," Rita Atterman Feder told 1,200 people -- most of them Chinese Americans -- who attended the concert at the San Gabriel Civic Auditorium.
NEWS
July 15, 1997 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ingrid Wilmot of Palos Verdes stopped eating apple cores just a few years ago. She had picked up the habit as a girl in this freewheeling treaty port during World War II, when food and dignity were scarce among the Jews who fled to China from the Nazi juggernaut in Europe. They came by the thousands to the only city on Earth that would accept them without passports or visas--no questions asked. Shanghai, den of vice and iniquity, opium addicts and imperialists, was their improbable haven.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1993
I am visiting here from my home in Beijing, and a news item in The Times (Aug. 14) concerning the Jewish community in Kaifeng, China, a millennium ago, recently came to my attention. It says that "few are able to explain how the group made its way from ancient Judea to central China." The fact is that over the past 300 years several Western and Chinese historians, based in part on records inscribed in stone by the Jews themselves, have described their route. To those interested in learning the details, I immodestly recommend a book I edited and compiled, "Jews in Old China: Studies by Chinese Scholars" (Hippocrene, New York, 1984)
NEWS
August 14, 1993 | Reuters
The Chinese city of Kaifeng has launched an international fund-raising drive to help it preserve a unique Jewish heritage that dates from before the time of Italian explorer Marco Polo. Kaifeng, in central Henan province, is seeking to rebuild a 17th-Century synagogue and collect research documents on a Jewish community that thrived 1,000 years ago on the Chinese side of the ancient Silk Road trading route.
NEWS
January 16, 1985 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Sidney Shapiro is a Jew, a Chinese and an American. From Brooklyn. It's probably as contradictory a mix of blood and culture as can be found, yet this 38-year resident of Peking wears his paradoxes lightly. In America he treads surely through corporate board rooms, wowing the powerful with tales of life behind what was once the Bamboo Curtain.
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