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NEWS
January 23, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As I waited to board a flight from Ben Gurion International Airport to New York, I felt an impatient shove from behind and turned to flash a bothered look at the offender, a rotund man who wore the sidelocks, black hat and frock coat of a devout Jew. "You got a problem, lady?" he asked in a heavy Brooklyn accent. "Yes," I answered. "I don't like to be pushed." "Well, maybe you can deal with that problem when you get home," he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2004 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
As the Jewish High Holidays start today and synagogues prepare for their largest annual crowds, questions are growing over whether younger, more assimilated Jews can be coaxed into the fold as future leaders. Jewish leaders say the vast organizational network that has helped perpetuate Jewish cultural identity in America is failing to attract sufficient young talent.
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NEWS
December 22, 1990 | DAVID MARGOLIS, David Margolis is a Los Angeles correspondent for the Jerusalem Report, a new English-language news weekly published in Israel. and
Jews needing to arbitrate business and personal disputes are increasingly turning to an ancient legal system, whose proceedings are substantially cheaper, quicker and more private than civil court. There has been a "tremendous explosion of interest" recently in arbitrations according to Jewish law, says Rabbi Avrohom Teichman, who directs a Los Angeles bet din (house of law).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Jewish Music Festival opened a four-night run at the Knitting Factory on Tuesday with a rousing set of tunes from Hollywood Klezmer. Although the group's glitzy name may have suggested otherwise, the program had a solidly traditional quality. And that was just fine for the moderate-sized but highly enthusiastic crowd, who reacted in spirited fashion to numbers that embraced such pop-derived numbers as "And the Angels Sing" and "Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen."
NEWS
December 13, 1990 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a black-and-white photograph, a solitary Jew in a skull cap and prayer shawl stands on a prairie, isolated against the vastness of a Western skyscape. When the man speaks into the photographer's tape recorder, however, the grandeur of the pioneer settling an untrod continent dissipates. "It just doesn't offer me what I'm looking for in terms of my career," says the man called Joe, explaining why he left his hometown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1989 | LYNN SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Students of Rabbi Daniel Epstein's crash course in Hebrew are facing their final exam--Yom Kippur. The students--including children, lawyers and computer specialists--have learned Hebrew phonetics and the meaning of religious phrases. They have been taught that apples and honey symbolize the sweetness of a new year. Some have even practiced blowing the shofar, a wind instrument made from a ram's horn that signifies spiritual awakening during the High Holy Days.
NEWS
April 23, 1998 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"They are not Jews in America. They are American citizens." --Woodrow Wilson **** For a people traditionally steeped in debate, dissent and Talmudic disputes, American Jews seem to be uncomfortable asking--let alone answering--a key question: How have Jews contributed to American life? What have they given to our national culture that is distinctively Judaic?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some 40,000 people celebrated the diversity within the Jewish community Sunday at the Valley Jewish Festival, which featured a multicultural blend of live entertainment, exotic food, educational seminars and children's activities. A rainbow of cultures, including members of the North American Conference of Ethiopian Jewry and the Iranian Jewish Eretz Cultural Center of Reseda, displayed their common ties to Judaism at the daylong festival held at Pierce College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1996 | CATHY WERBLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jeff Schreiber, a Costa Mesa mail carrier for 19 years, had a dilemma. Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, landed on a Saturday earlier this month and, try as he might, he could not get out of work on the highest of Jewish holidays. The post office relented, and Schreiber had to work just three hours on Rosh Hashana instead of the entire day. Though his struggle became public, dozens of other such situations arise that are typically handled in more private arenas.
NEWS
April 22, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shoppers in a market along bustling Pico Boulevard seek succulent sweets, smoked fish, dried dates, nuts and other delicacies arranged below signs in both Persian and English. Browsers at a Fairfax Avenue bookstore pick through Middle Eastern newspapers, magazines and compact discs. Refugees from the former Soviet Union line up for citizenship classes, religious instruction and social services at West Hollywood storefronts featuring Cyrillic lettering.
NEWS
April 26, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leslaw Piszewski was 16 when he started "suspecting something" about his family, but for years he couldn't figure out what it was. "There were too many secrets," he recalled. "I started asking questions and did not get answers." The urge to know the truth grew when he was 23 and his daughter was born. "I thought, I must tell my child who I am, who my parents are, who my grandparents are and where we come from," he explained.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000 | WILLOUGBY MARIANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across Orange County beginning tonight, in meeting halls, restaurants and country clubs, Jews will gather to celebrate in large groups what traditionally has been a family occasion held in the home--the Passover Seder. So-called community Seders are made necessary by modern life, rabbis say. Families live farther apart, and people often can't gather in the home of a relative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000 | ELAINE GALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Celebrating an ancient ceremony in a modern way, many Jewish families in Orange County and beyond are personalizing the ritual text read for Passover, which begins at sundown tonight. Most rituals of the Passover Seder--a meal including symbolic foods such as bitter herbs, matzo, paschal lamb and kosher wine--have been unchanged for centuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Huddled around one of several tables, Debbie Matian and her classmates brainstormed over a list of 10 things they had learned from the Passover story. The room was abuzz with fourth-graders playing a game based on the 14 steps of the Seder, or ritual Passover meal. A teacher blew a whistle and the noise level dropped. One group wanted to share a cheer they had written about afikomen, the broken piece of matzo that children search for after the meal is eaten. "Afikomen! Afikomen! Afikomen!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Described by its creators as a traveling Jewish children's museum, Jewish Expo 2000 will visit the Valley just in time for Hanukkah. The exhibit, which uses interactive technology to tell the story of the Jews, will be at the Bernard Milken Jewish Community Campus in West Hills from Monday through Dec. 12. Hanukkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights, begins at sundown Friday.
NEWS
August 29, 1999 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family--about 35, including an infant in arms--is celebrating the birthday of its patriarch. It could be any Westside family, except: The men sit on one side of the long table, the women on the other. The little girls wear long dresses; the little boys' hair is cropped short, save for long curls in front of their ears. And the men have abundant beards. These are Hasidic Jews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Described by its creators as a traveling Jewish children's museum, Jewish Expo 2000 will visit the Valley just in time for Hanukkah. The exhibit, which uses interactive technology to tell the story of the Jews, will be at the Bernard Milken Jewish Community Campus in West Hills from Monday through Dec. 12. Hanukkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights, begins at sundown Friday.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure from top Soviet government and Communist Party officials, Moscow city authorities agreed Wednesday to permit a weeklong international Jewish film festival despite their earlier fears that the festival might bring anti-Semitic demonstrations. Reversing their previous decision, the city authorities said that "the political situation in the city . . . was less complicated" and that security could be provided for those attending the festival, scheduled to begin Saturday.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1999 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The hours are unpredictable, the pay is uncertain, the training is arduous and job talk at parties can be a bit awkward. But the benefits are heavenly for those who dedicate themselves to being mohels (pronounced MOY-ehls), those who perform the ritual circumcisions of 8-day-old Jewish boys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1999 | ART MARROQUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dancers clasped hands and threw each other across the stage Sunday as the crowd clapped to the vibrant rhythm from a wailing violin. Clad in colorful, traditional clothing from Israel, Russia and Greece, the lithe dancers from the Keshet Chaim "Rainbow of Life" ensemble engaged the crowd with the varied cultural history of the global Jewish community.
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