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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1996 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Oh Christmas tree, oh Christmas tree, how quickly we see you disappear. Second-graders at a Manhattan Beach elementary school showed up Monday and found a fully decorated 7-foot artificial Christmas tree inside their classroom, courtesy of one of the students' mothers. A nice gift, the mother thought, to surprise the children. But many of the students in this Pennekamp Elementary School classroom, as well as the teacher, are Jewish.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1994 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual exploration of their heritage, Orange County Jews young and old are gathering this week to learn about topics as diverse as "How to Refute Missionaries" and "Male and Female Roles in the Bible." The reason for the sudden rush for knowledge: Jewish Education Week, proclaimed by the County Board of Supervisors at the urging of the nonprofit Bureau of Jewish Education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1999 | ART MARROQUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dancers clasped hands and threw each other across the stage Sunday as the crowd clapped to the vibrant rhythm from a wailing violin. Clad in colorful, traditional clothing from Israel, Russia and Greece, the lithe dancers from the Keshet Chaim "Rainbow of Life" ensemble engaged the crowd with the varied cultural history of the global Jewish community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For several months, mail carrier Troy Westfield watched the once-blank wall on the Horner Street side of the Workmen's Circle building slowly come alive before him. First appeared the blob-like shapes and figures sketched in black. Then children, middle-aged folks and a few elderly women and men painted in the lines with vibrant blues, pinks and greens. Hazy silhouettes sharpened into famous Yiddish writers. Swaths of yellow crystallized into a giant menorah.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1996
Laura Spitzer sat at a children's table while her 3-year-old daughter, Jessica, pretended to prepare Shabbat--a Jewish family dinner traditionally served on Fridays, consisting of fish and challah, or egg bread--for her. "I'm usually the one fixing the meals at home for our dinner," Spitzer said Tuesday. "This is great because it puts her in my role so she's learning the significance of the different parts of the dinner. Kids love this stuff."
NEWS
April 26, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leslaw Piszewski was 16 when he started "suspecting something" about his family, but for years he couldn't figure out what it was. "There were too many secrets," he recalled. "I started asking questions and did not get answers." The urge to know the truth grew when he was 23 and his daughter was born. "I thought, I must tell my child who I am, who my parents are, who my grandparents are and where we come from," he explained.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Potato latkes, chocolate coins, eight joyous nights of candle lighting and even Milton Berle are in store for Orange County's more than 70,000 Jews once the sun sets tonight. But Orange County rabbis are also eager to impart a more serious Hanukkah message to their congregations--that the eight-day Jewish Festival of Lights should serve as a reminder to Jews to retain their identity.
NEWS
December 3, 1988 | MICHAEL WELZENBACH
Beginning this evening and continuing for the next eight days, Jewish families and communities the world over will gather to celebrate the festival of Hanukkah. The celebration is more visible to non-Jews than some other Jewish festivals because of its proximity to Christmas--which, in American culture, has become an official national celebration--along with Thanksgiving and New Year's, constituting what amounts to a two-month-long commercial holiday season.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1991
You refer to the attack on Pearl Harbor as "one of the greatest surprises in the annals of warfare." To refer to the Japanese attack as a "surprise" is to intimate that our armed forces were somehow outsmarted by superior military strategy. The victims of Japan's attack were at breakfast or otherwise preparing for a pleasant Sunday. Our countrymen were bombed without a chance to defend themselves. It was a cowardly act by Japan and "surprise" will never supplant "sneak."
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