Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJews Czechoslovakia
IN THE NEWS

Jews Czechoslovakia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | MICHAEL DOBBS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Madeleine Albright was 2 years old when her parents whisked her out of Czechoslovakia in March 1939, less than two weeks after the Nazi occupation, and gave up their life as a prominent Czech diplomatic family and said goodbye to many relatives. Eventually, she and her parents came to America, where Albright followed her father's footsteps into a diplomatic career that culminated two weeks ago when President Clinton made her the first female secretary of State.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | MICHAEL DOBBS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Madeleine Albright was 2 years old when her parents whisked her out of Czechoslovakia in March 1939, less than two weeks after the Nazi occupation, and gave up their life as a prominent Czech diplomatic family and said goodbye to many relatives. Eventually, she and her parents came to America, where Albright followed her father's footsteps into a diplomatic career that culminated two weeks ago when President Clinton made her the first female secretary of State.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1991 | KIKU LANI IWATA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Dasha Lewin, the memories came flooding back Wednesday night as she listened in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion to the Boston Symphony Orchestra perform a work composed at the Nazi concentration camp Terezin--where she was imprisoned as a child. Like Lewin, the work, Pavel Haas' Study for String Orchestra, survived, although the composer did not. "I am hearing it as if I am there," said Lewin, who said her father died in Terezin, in Czechoslovakia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1991 | KIKU LANI IWATA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Dasha Lewin, the memories came flooding back Wednesday night as she listened in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion to the Boston Symphony Orchestra perform a work composed at the Nazi concentration camp Terezin--where she was imprisoned as a child. Like Lewin, the work, Pavel Haas' Study for String Orchestra, survived, although the composer did not. "I am hearing it as if I am there," said Lewin, who said her father died in Terezin, in Czechoslovakia.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
This East Bloc nation and Israel on Friday renewed diplomatic relations, rectifying what Prague's foreign minister called the "nonsense" of rupturing ties in 1967. "Today, we have taken the first step" toward "very good and very friendly relations," Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe Arens said after signing the agreement with his Czechoslovak counterpart, Jiri Dienstbier.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | MICHAEL WISE, REUTERS
The ancient Jewish quarter of Prague is alive with new hope for a revival of Czech Jewry now that the capital's dwindling, 1,000-year-old Jewish community has been freed from the tight control of the Communist authorities. In a rebellion sparked by the broader one that led to the end of the Communist Party's monopoly of power, Czech Jews have ousted two state-salaried leaders whom they accused of autocratically aligning the Jewish community with the party.
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the eve of World War II, nearly 6 million Jews lived in Germany, Poland, Hungary, Romania and the other countries of Eastern Europe. Today, after the Holocaust and the postwar exodus, barely 150,000 Jews remain in what was once the site of a rich, accomplished and complex Jewish civilization that far transcended the shtetl culture so familiar to us from countless performances of "Fiddler on the Roof."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Matej Minac's heart-wrenching "All My Loved Ones" begins with some brief BBC clips of a 1998 reunion of British stockbroker Nicholas Winton and a group of men and women who were among the nearly 700 Czech Jewish children whose lives Winton saved when he organized a series of Kindertransport trains out of Prague bound for England beginning in 1938.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Susan King
After visiting Prague in late 1938, a young British stockbroker named Nicholas Winton had an "intuition" about the fate of Jews in Czechoslovakia now that the country had come under Nazi occupation. So he began his own Kindertransport organization to rescue at risk Jewish children and send them to safety in England. Before the outbreak of World War II in Europe on Sept. 1, 1939, this British Oskar Schindler was able to organize seven rail-sea transports bringing 669 youngsters to host families in Great Britain.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|