Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJews Eastern Europe
IN THE NEWS

Jews Eastern Europe

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 4, 1992
A new organization will seek restitution of Jewish communal property worth billions of dollars seized by Nazi and Communist governments in Eastern Europe, it was disclosed in Jerusalem. The new Jewish Restitution Organization unites eight groups to claim return of or compensation for communal assets, including schools, hospitals, synagogues, artworks and ritual objects.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
July 27, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is a Times film critic and former editor of the Book Review.
Say "THE six million" and some will know what you mean, that you're referring to the number of Jews killed in the Holocaust. But knowledge of who those people were and what the outline of their world might have been has been much harder to come by. More than that, our lack of knowledge puts us in danger of having that massive, undifferentiated number stand in for a sophisticated, nuanced reality.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Red and green pins dot the six-foot-wide map of the former Soviet Union--all spots where sizable Jewish communities remain, where economic collapse could bring political unrest and ethnic conflict but where Israel now has its own agents able to help the Jews to flee. "There must be the option for every Jew to leave and to come to Israel, and I can say now that there is," Baruch Gur, the head of the Jewish Agency's Eastern Europe department, declared with a sweep of his hand across the map.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1997 | EDWARD SEROTTA, Edward Serotta's most recent book is "Jews, Germany, Memory: A Contemporary Portrait." He is the director of the Central Europe Center in Berlin
Vera Somerova, 78, has no pictures in her tiny Prague apartment of the day she married professor Walter Eisinger 53 years ago, nor does her neighbor Kurt Kotouc, one of the invited guests. It is hardly surprising, considering that the wedding took place in the Theresienstadt concentration camp, just north of Prague. Eisinger, a passionate optimist, lived with and taught a group of 14-year-old boys (Kotouc among them) who had already seen their parents shipped off to Auschwitz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1997 | EDWARD SEROTTA, Edward Serotta's most recent book is "Jews, Germany, Memory: A Contemporary Portrait." He is the director of the Central Europe Center in Berlin
Vera Somerova, 78, has no pictures in her tiny Prague apartment of the day she married professor Walter Eisinger 53 years ago, nor does her neighbor Kurt Kotouc, one of the invited guests. It is hardly surprising, considering that the wedding took place in the Theresienstadt concentration camp, just north of Prague. Eisinger, a passionate optimist, lived with and taught a group of 14-year-old boys (Kotouc among them) who had already seen their parents shipped off to Auschwitz.
BOOKS
July 27, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is a Times film critic and former editor of the Book Review.
Say "THE six million" and some will know what you mean, that you're referring to the number of Jews killed in the Holocaust. But knowledge of who those people were and what the outline of their world might have been has been much harder to come by. More than that, our lack of knowledge puts us in danger of having that massive, undifferentiated number stand in for a sophisticated, nuanced reality.
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the eve of World War II, nearly 6 million Jews lived in Germany, Poland, Hungary, Romania and the other countries of Eastern Europe. Today, after the Holocaust and the postwar exodus, barely 150,000 Jews remain in what was once the site of a rich, accomplished and complex Jewish civilization that far transcended the shtetl culture so familiar to us from countless performances of "Fiddler on the Roof."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
"The Jewish Heritage in American Folk Art," an exploration of a facet of folk creativity organized by the Museum of Folk Art and the Jewish Museum in New York, is on view at the Hebrew Union College's Skirball Museum through April 27. The exhibition consists of about ceremonial and secular objects from 1720 to the present. The earliest generations of Sephardic and Ashkenazic Jewish settlers, few in numbers, tended to assimilate their cultural patterns with those of the local population.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2000
Charles Hoffman, 54, American-born Israeli journalist who reported on the Jews of Eastern Europe. Hoffman was born in Texas in 1946 and was educated at Brandeis University and the New School for Social Research in New York. He spent his junior year in Israel, where he lived through the drama and aftermath of the Six-Day War in 1967. He subsequently decided to make Jerusalem his home and earned a master's degree in sociology from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
NEWS
December 21, 1990 | Reuters
The Israeli government told airport officials today to prepare all available planes for the immediate transport of Soviet Jews from eastern Europe as immigrants flooded in at a rate of about 3,000 a day. "We have been urged by the minister of transport to make every possible aircraft available for this over the weekend and have obtained special permission to fly on the Sabbath (Saturday)," said Nachman Kleinman, spokesman for the airline El Al.
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Red and green pins dot the six-foot-wide map of the former Soviet Union--all spots where sizable Jewish communities remain, where economic collapse could bring political unrest and ethnic conflict but where Israel now has its own agents able to help the Jews to flee. "There must be the option for every Jew to leave and to come to Israel, and I can say now that there is," Baruch Gur, the head of the Jewish Agency's Eastern Europe department, declared with a sweep of his hand across the map.
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the eve of World War II, nearly 6 million Jews lived in Germany, Poland, Hungary, Romania and the other countries of Eastern Europe. Today, after the Holocaust and the postwar exodus, barely 150,000 Jews remain in what was once the site of a rich, accomplished and complex Jewish civilization that far transcended the shtetl culture so familiar to us from countless performances of "Fiddler on the Roof."
NEWS
August 4, 1992
A new organization will seek restitution of Jewish communal property worth billions of dollars seized by Nazi and Communist governments in Eastern Europe, it was disclosed in Jerusalem. The new Jewish Restitution Organization unites eight groups to claim return of or compensation for communal assets, including schools, hospitals, synagogues, artworks and ritual objects.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
German industry indicated Tuesday that it is ready to free its half of a $4.6-billion compensation fund for Nazi-era slave and forced laborers, clearing one of the last major hurdles for payments to aging survivors. A statement by German industry said a U.S. judge's dismissal of a crucial lawsuit signaled the protection from legal action that German companies have demanded as their part of the deal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oren Rudavsky and Yale Strom's warm and bracing hourlong documentary "At the Crossroads: Jews in Eastern Europe Today" (at the Monica 4-Plex) is preceded--very effectively--by two 10-minute travelogues, "Jewish Life in Cracow" (1939) and "A Day in Warsaw" (1938), which reveal the richness and diversity of Jewish life in Poland that existed since the 12th Century but was all but obliterated by the Holocaust.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|