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NEWS
July 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vandals painted swastikas and anti-Semitic slogans on more than 70 headstones in a Jewish cemetery in Manchester and smashed others over the weekend in what police said appeared to be the work of neo-Nazis. Police said the attack may have been carried out by a gang of supporters of the National Front, which advocates expulsion of racial minorities from Britain.
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NEWS
March 14, 2000 | From Reuters
A German museum returned a stolen painting Monday to a family that had fled to Britain from Nazi rule, highlighting an international campaign to restore looted works of art. "We believe this sets an important precedent for all museums holding looted art," Anne Webber, co-chair of the Commission for Looted Art in Europe, told a news conference at Britain's Royal Academy of Arts, where the painting was on loan.
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NEWS
January 2, 1988 | Associated Press
The chief rabbi of Britain has been made a peer for the first time, and he will take his place alongside the prelates of the Church of England in the House of Lords. The new Lord Immanuel Jakobovits, who fled to England from Nazi Germany, was named in the queen's New Year's honors list in what some saw as more of a tribute to his conservative views than to Britain's 400,000 Jews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1998 | Religion News Service
Leaders of the different denominations within British Judaism have signed a historic declaration aimed at ending a dispute that erupted after the death of the widely respected and much-loved Reform Rabbi Hugo Gryn in August 1996. Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, an Orthodox rabbi who has traditionally been regarded as a spokesman for all of British Jewry, refused to attend Gryn's funeral because it would have meant recognizing Reform Judaism.
NEWS
March 14, 2000 | From Reuters
A German museum returned a stolen painting Monday to a family that had fled to Britain from Nazi rule, highlighting an international campaign to restore looted works of art. "We believe this sets an important precedent for all museums holding looted art," Anne Webber, co-chair of the Commission for Looted Art in Europe, told a news conference at Britain's Royal Academy of Arts, where the painting was on loan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1998 | Religion News Service
Leaders of the different denominations within British Judaism have signed a historic declaration aimed at ending a dispute that erupted after the death of the widely respected and much-loved Reform Rabbi Hugo Gryn in August 1996. Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, an Orthodox rabbi who has traditionally been regarded as a spokesman for all of British Jewry, refused to attend Gryn's funeral because it would have meant recognizing Reform Judaism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1988
Apparently Pfaff feels he has a license to rewrite Jewish history. "The West Bank never belonged to Israel." "It was Ottoman territory until World War I." Really, now! And from whom did the Ottoman Turks and their predecessors steal it? The West Bank is a name invented by the Jordanians as a modern-day technique emulating the Romans of old--change the name to eliminate the Jewish connection with the land. The so-called West Bank is Judea and Samaria, and all international maps prior to 1948, including Ottoman maps, so stated.
BOOKS
January 28, 1996 | Patric Kuh, Patric Kuh is the author of a novel, "An Available Man." He lives in Los Angeles
Before the English had spies, counterspies and moles to obsess about, they had the Jews. James Shapiro's new book traces British cultural anxieties about the Jews in the period from the 16th to the 18th centuries and is filled with scenarios that only a Borscht Belt Le Carre could come up with. According to popular opinion of the time, England was crowded with false Jews, counterfeit Christians, Jesuit "handlers" and statesmen "turned Jews."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2001 | LAUREL ROSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the grittier corners of east and south London, British hip-hop heads bounce to the same beat that pounds in American clubs. But instead of sending shout-outs to Long Beach or Brooklyn, these days the MCs here send them to Lewisham and Brixton. After 15 years of mimicking the American accents and gangsta bravado of U.S.-born rap, British hip-hoppers are making the art form their own. They're rapping in their own accents, talking about their own streets, telling of life in their own country.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vandals painted swastikas and anti-Semitic slogans on more than 70 headstones in a Jewish cemetery in Manchester and smashed others over the weekend in what police said appeared to be the work of neo-Nazis. Police said the attack may have been carried out by a gang of supporters of the National Front, which advocates expulsion of racial minorities from Britain.
NEWS
January 2, 1988 | Associated Press
The chief rabbi of Britain has been made a peer for the first time, and he will take his place alongside the prelates of the Church of England in the House of Lords. The new Lord Immanuel Jakobovits, who fled to England from Nazi Germany, was named in the queen's New Year's honors list in what some saw as more of a tribute to his conservative views than to Britain's 400,000 Jews.
BOOKS
April 19, 1987 | Jacob Neusner, Neusner, Ungerleider Distinguished Scholar of Judaic Studies at Brown University, is the author, most recently, of "Self-Fulfilling Prophecy: Exile and Return in the History of Judaism" (Beacon) and "Death and Birth of Judaism: The Impact of Christianity, Secularism, and the Holocaust on Jewish Faith" (Basic)
Paul Johnson is excited by "the sheer span of Jewish history." Loving these "long continuities," and seeing the Jews as having a "separate and specific identity earlier than almost any other people which still survives," he has come with great enthusiasm to a subject he in fact does not grasp at all. The result is a pleasure to read, but most of what is in it is either half-true or all wrong.
OPINION
May 12, 2009 | Nicholas Goldberg, Nicholas Goldberg is deputy editor of The Times' editorial pages.
William I. Robinson, a professor of sociology at UC Santa Barbara, probably shouldn't have been surprised when he found himself in the news earlier this month. He had, after all, forwarded an e-mail to his students that juxtaposed images of Palestinians caught up in Israel's recent Gaza Strip offensive with Jewish victims of the Nazis. The e-mail included graphic photographs of dead Jewish children from the 1940s alongside similar photos from Gaza.
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