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NEWS
August 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ethiopia's new government agreed to let Israel fly out 2,600 black Jews left behind after an emergency airlift to the Jewish state in May. The Israeli Foreign Ministry said the first 600 black Jews will be brought to Israel in time for the Sept. 9 Jewish New Year. The rest are expected to arrive within three months. The exodus would be made on commercial flights, probably Ethiopian Airways, an Israeli Foreign Ministry official said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 30, 1996 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their native Ethiopia, they were hounded as Jews and told they should "return" to their real homeland: Israel. So they did. With the help of American Jewish groups and the Israeli government, tens of thousands of Ethiopian Jews who believed they were one of the lost tribes of Israel emigrated to the Jewish state so that they might finally feel at home. Instead, they found themselves to be aliens in yet another land.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1992 | ANDREA HEIMAN
Howard Lenhoff's organization is about to dissolve. And he couldn't be happier. Lenhoff, a member of Temple B'nai Israel in Tustin, is one of the founding members of the American Assn. for Ethiopian Jews. "We were created to free Jews," explained Lenhoff, a Costa Mesa resident. "Now that that has been done, we're getting ready to close and move our resources to Israel." Lenhoff, a professor of biology at UC Irvine, met a young Jewish Ethiopian man when he was on sabbatical in Israel in 1973.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1995 | MAKI BECKER
It was the first time Aviva Beecha and Mulaw Yaacov, both 17, had danced to Mexican ranchero music and it was the first time Norma Pineola, 16, had shimmied her shoulders to Ethiopian pop. Aviva and Mulaw, who visited Polytechnic High School in Sun Valley this week, are part of an eight-member envoy to Los Angeles of high school-age students who were among the 14,000 Ethiopian Jews airlifted from Sudan to Israel in 1985.
NEWS
May 28, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having concluded what officials here called the largest airlift operation since the U.S. evacuation of Saigon, Israeli officials on Monday began debating a second operation to rescue thousands of Ethiopians trapped in Addis Ababa who gave up their Jewish faith and converted to Christianity.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a rebel army pressing on this capital city from three fronts, Israeli authorities here began a massive airlift Friday designed to spirit more than 14,000 Ethiopian Jews to safety in Israel over a period of 48 hours.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 15 years ago, a group of Israeli and American men went to the small village of Quara in Ethiopia, spoke to the elders and asked for the names of all the Jews. Men, women and children--the men carefully wrote down their names and then drove away as suddenly as they had come, leaving behind a promise that, one day, they would be back to take them to Israel.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They wouldn't let me see it either. The monks laughed: What a foolish question. Only the high priest and one selected guardian, they explained, are permitted inside the sanctuary to view the richest treasure of this Christian shrine, the holiest object of the Ethiopian church: the Ark of the Covenant.
NEWS
April 13, 1987
A Sudanese court reduced to 10 years the life sentence imposed last year on former Vice President Omar Tayeb for his role in transporting thousands of Ethiopian Jews through Sudan to Israel in late 1984 and early 1985. The Appeals High Court said the life term and consecutive 30-year sentence reflected the political climate in Sudan in the wake of the 1985 coup that deposed President Jaafar Numeiri, in whose government Tayeb served.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ethiopian leader Mengistu Haile Mariam is denying 10,000 Jews permission to emigrate to Israel as a way to get military supplies from the Jewish state, a leader of the Ethiopian community in Israel said. The accusation comes amid reports that Mengistu's hard-line Marxist government is teetering as secessionist rebels gain ground in their battle to topple him.
NEWS
January 20, 1993 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Israeli government committee recommended Tuesday that thousands of Ethiopians whose families converted from Judaism to Christianity over the years should not be brought here as a group to join relatives who have arrived over the past decade in mass airlifts. The decision--though it calls for admission of spouses, parents and children of Ethiopians who have already emigrated--was immediately denounced by leaders of the Ethiopian community as "tearing our hearts out."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1992 | ANDREA HEIMAN
Howard Lenhoff's organization is about to dissolve. And he couldn't be happier. Lenhoff, a member of Temple B'nai Israel in Tustin, is one of the founding members of the American Assn. for Ethiopian Jews. "We were created to free Jews," explained Lenhoff, a Costa Mesa resident. "Now that that has been done, we're getting ready to close and move our resources to Israel." Lenhoff, a professor of biology at UC Irvine, met a young Jewish Ethiopian man when he was on sabbatical in Israel in 1973.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They wouldn't let me see it either. The monks laughed: What a foolish question. Only the high priest and one selected guardian, they explained, are permitted inside the sanctuary to view the richest treasure of this Christian shrine, the holiest object of the Ethiopian church: the Ark of the Covenant.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ethiopia's new government agreed to let Israel fly out 2,600 black Jews left behind after an emergency airlift to the Jewish state in May. The Israeli Foreign Ministry said the first 600 black Jews will be brought to Israel in time for the Sept. 9 Jewish New Year. The rest are expected to arrive within three months. The exodus would be made on commercial flights, probably Ethiopian Airways, an Israeli Foreign Ministry official said.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Israeli officials, still basking in the glow from their lightning airlift of more than 14,000 Ethiopian Jews, expressed confidence that at least 2,000 who were left behind will be allowed to emigrate eventually. "There is no doubt in my mind that in the future there will be a basic, cordial relationship between the people of Israel and the people of Ethiopia," said Uri Lubrani, coordinator of the rescue operation.
NEWS
May 28, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having concluded what officials here called the largest airlift operation since the U.S. evacuation of Saigon, Israeli officials on Monday began debating a second operation to rescue thousands of Ethiopians trapped in Addis Ababa who gave up their Jewish faith and converted to Christianity.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | Reuters
Ethiopia has abruptly halted an exodus of black Jews to Israel to pressure the Jewish state into supplying military aid to help it fight a worsening civil war, community leaders said Wednesday. "The halt was very sudden, without any warning from the Ethiopian government," said Rahamim Elazar, secretary of Israel's Ethiopian organization. "The Ethiopian government wants Israel to provide it arms due to the increasing war in recent weeks," he said.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Marxist government of Ethiopia has reached an agreement with the United States and Israel to more than double the number of Jews it allows to emigrate, officials said Monday. The Ethiopian government is being rewarded with Israeli aid and a thaw in relations with Washington, which have been strained for over a decade, the officials said.
NEWS
May 27, 1991 | From Associated Press
Still rejoicing over its dramatic airlift of Ethiopian Jews, Israel began Sunday to find homes, jobs and schools for the 14,000 newcomers, some of whom have never switched on a light bulb. At temporary living centers across Israel, doctors gave check-ups and volunteers distributed clothing, taught the immigrants to use kitchen utensils and toilets and collected lists of names to aid relatives seeking family members.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 15 years ago, a group of Israeli and American men went to the small village of Quara in Ethiopia, spoke to the elders and asked for the names of all the Jews. Men, women and children--the men carefully wrote down their names and then drove away as suddenly as they had come, leaving behind a promise that, one day, they would be back to take them to Israel.
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