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NEWS
October 1, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two studies published in the October issue of Nature Genetics indicate that about 1 in 100 Jewish women of Eastern European descent, or about four times as many as previously thought, harbors a specific genetic mutation that increases her risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The gene in question, called BRCA2, is almost never mutated in other ethnic groups and is unrelated to a gene called BRCA1, which also increases the risk of breast and ovarian cancer.
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NEWS
November 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
The families of children who died of a rare degenerative brain disease are suing researchers who used their blood and tissue to identify and patent the gene responsible for the disorder. The families contend the patent has hindered study of Canavan disease, which most commonly afflicts children of Ashkenazi Jewish families whose ancestors lived in eastern and central Europe.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
A defect in a familial breast cancer gene discovered in 1994 also appears to cause a significant share of sporadic, non-familial breast cancer cases in young women, according to researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. The gene appears to be especially active in Jews, in whom it may trigger more than a quarter of all cases detected before age 40.
NEWS
August 26, 1997 | RICK WEISS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Researchers have discovered a new kind of genetic defect that doubles a person's risk of colon cancer and is present in one of every 17 American Jews, making it the most common cancer-associated mutation ever identified in any ethnic population. The mutation, apparently rare in non-Jews, appears to be responsible for about 1 in 4 cases of inherited colon cancer in Ashkenazi Jews--those of Eastern European ancestry, who constitute more than 95% of this country's 6 million Jews. It can be detected with a newly available $200 blood test, which some geneticists predict will quickly become one of the more commonly used genetic tests.
NEWS
August 26, 1997 | RICK WEISS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Researchers have discovered a new kind of genetic defect that doubles a person's risk of colon cancer and is present in one of every 17 American Jews, making it the most common cancer-associated mutation ever identified in any ethnic population. The mutation, apparently rare in non-Jews, appears to be responsible for about 1 in 4 cases of inherited colon cancer in Ashkenazi Jews--those of Eastern European ancestry, who constitute more than 95% of this country's 6 million Jews. It can be detected with a newly available $200 blood test, which some geneticists predict will quickly become one of the more commonly used genetic tests.
NEWS
November 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
The families of children who died of a rare degenerative brain disease are suing researchers who used their blood and tissue to identify and patent the gene responsible for the disorder. The families contend the patent has hindered study of Canavan disease, which most commonly afflicts children of Ashkenazi Jewish families whose ancestors lived in eastern and central Europe.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
La Jolla scientists have identified the second major genetic defect that causes Gaucher's disease, a debilitating, inherited disorder that is most common among Jews of European descent. The discovery makes it possible for the first time to identify carriers of Gaucher's disease--an estimated one of every 12 Ashkenazic Jews--with full confidence that virtually all affected individuals will be identified. It also makes possible effective prenatal screening.
WORLD
January 28, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- Rocked by a scandal involving birth-control treatments for Ethiopian Jews, Israel's health ministry issued new guidelines on the use of the injections known commercially as Depo-Provera. In a recent letter to the country's four HMOs reported Sunday , Ron Gamzu, director general of the health ministry, instructed gynecologists against renewing prescriptions in cases where the patient does not fully understand the treatment's implications. The ministry's new policy comes in response to a controversy exposed last month by local investigative journalist Gal Gabbay, who reported that Jewish Ethiopian women awaiting emigration to Israel in transit camps in Ethiopia were coaxed into the treatment with little medical explanation and led to understand this was a condition for moving to Israel.
NEWS
March 17, 1989 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Though they still have difficulty understanding English, about 175 Spanish-speaking immigrants showed Thursday that there has been a payoff to the civics classes they are taking to qualify for the U.S. amnesty program. Displaying political instincts that have worked for waves of immigrant groups before them, the would-be citizens from northern and southern regions of the state showed up in the capital to demonstrate, meet the press, picket a state agency and hear speeches from elected officials.
NEWS
October 1, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two studies published in the October issue of Nature Genetics indicate that about 1 in 100 Jewish women of Eastern European descent, or about four times as many as previously thought, harbors a specific genetic mutation that increases her risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The gene in question, called BRCA2, is almost never mutated in other ethnic groups and is unrelated to a gene called BRCA1, which also increases the risk of breast and ovarian cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
A defect in a familial breast cancer gene discovered in 1994 also appears to cause a significant share of sporadic, non-familial breast cancer cases in young women, according to researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. The gene appears to be especially active in Jews, in whom it may trigger more than a quarter of all cases detected before age 40.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
La Jolla scientists have identified the second major genetic defect that causes Gaucher's disease, a debilitating, inherited disorder that is most common among Jews of European descent. The discovery makes it possible for the first time to identify carriers of Gaucher's disease--an estimated one of every 12 Ashkenazic Jews--with full confidence that virtually all affected individuals will be identified. It also makes possible effective prenatal screening.
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