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NEWS
November 8, 2000 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Go, cantor, go!" urged Beth Elliott. The traditional Jewish wedding song she was playing on her viola had struck a chord with the white-haired Alzheimer's patient. A smile creased his face, and in a clear, steady voice, he began to sing. Elliott extended her hand, he took it, they danced. Former cantor William Nussen, 79, was among about 35 residents in varying stages of Alzheimer's disease gathered for a workshop in a dining room at the Jewish Home for the Aging in Reseda.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1997 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
When "The Long Way Home" opened last week under the Moriah Films banner, audiences probably thought, "Moriah Films? Never heard of it." This moving documentary chronicling events in the lives of the Jews who survived Hitler's Third Reich only to have international doors slam shut on them is, however, the fourth film produced by the Simon Wiesenthal Center, which launched Moriah Films in 1994.
NEWS
October 25, 1995 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the stately old Union Club, amid chandeliers and dark paneled walls, Gabriel Harrar, a 33-year-old dentist, was explaining what had brought him back home to Morocco after 13 years in France. "It was a business opportunity," Harrar was saying. "I never intended to stay more than six months. So now six months have become six years, and I can't imagine ever leaving. I have a wife and baby now and my life is here. I feel completely secure."
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | TRISHA GINSBURG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As Joel Mann held hands with fellow Jewish teen-agers, marching 5,000 strong on a historical path that had been tread by so many before him, he felt a surge of power and hope that made the entire journey worthwhile. Mann, a 17-year-old senior from Pacifica High in Garden Grove, and the other Jewish youths were participating in the March of the Living, a trek that every other year goes through the ashes of the Holocaust in Poland into the open arms of Israel.
NEWS
April 10, 2000 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As founder of Chapman University's Holocaust education program, Marilyn J. Harran teaches two courses a year on the subject. She's familiar with World War II's atrocities, and she's heard survivors' firsthand accounts of life and death in Nazi concentration camps. But as a contributing author to the newly released "The Holocaust Chronicle: A History in Words and Pictures," she wasn't prepared for the emotional toll the work would take on her.
BOOKS
January 18, 2004 | Abraham Brumberg, Abraham Brumberg is the editor of "Poland: Genesis of a Revolution," among other books.
What a sad story this is -- the story of Polish-Jewish relations for nearly 1,000 years. Sad, for there were hopeful moments during this period, promising that relations between these two peoples would turn out happier than they did. Poland in the Middle Ages was a relatively tolerant place where kings and much of the nobility allowed Jews to manage their legal and cultural affairs and have a degree of religious freedom virtually unknown in the rest of Europe.
NEWS
March 26, 2000 | JEROME SOCOLOVSKY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kneeling between rows of moss-streaked graves with Hebrew epitaphs, Tineke Arentse seeks to atone for what her faith and country have done to Jews. She and other Christian volunteers, as they do every year, are refurbishing a Jewish cemetery. Working with sponges and brushes, they wash the wafer-thin granite and marble headstones, glue back broken fragments, repaint Hebrew letters, pull weeds.
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