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NEWS
December 11, 1987
Canada announced that Imre Finta, a former Hungarian police captain, has been charged in the deportation of more than 8,600 Jews from Hungary during World War II. Finta is the first Canadian to be charged with war crimes. Canada recently changed its laws to allow the government to prosecute residents for war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in other countries. Finta, 76, was detained as he boarded a bus in Hamilton, Ontario, bound for Buffalo, N.Y.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1999 | JUDITH I. BRENNAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The title of a new documentary about the Holocaust, "The Last Days," carries a double meaning for survivor Tom Lantos. "Not just the last days of the war. It is the last days for us . . . survivors of the Holocaust. Soon we will be no more," says Lantos, now a California congressman from the San Mateo-San Francisco area.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1988 | KATHERINE M. GRIFFIN, Times Staff Writer
During the darkest days of the Holocaust, Dr. Laszlo Petrovicz was a steady beacon of light for Jews in Budapest. As a Hungarian army doctor assigned to a Jewish labor colony, he helped dozens of captives escape under the guise of sending them to medical specialists. He and his Jewish wife, Zsuszanna, a nurse, provided food and medical care to Jews in Budapest's ghetto. They obtained false identification papers for many and hid others in their own home, written testimonies from survivors say.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning this winter, thousands of Jewish survivors of the Holocaust will receive monthly payments from Hungary under a landmark agreement to ease Jewish suffering from World War II. Nearly 50 years late in coming, the deal is being hailed by some Jewish and government leaders as a model for Eastern Europe, where most of the 6 million Jewish victims of the Holocaust perished but few governments have settled accounts with devastated communities.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over Vatican objections, the heirs of a Jewish community decimated by the Holocaust publicly rebuked visiting Pope John Paul II here Sunday for the silence of his church in Hungary during the tragic years of World War II.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1999 | JUDITH I. BRENNAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The title of a new documentary about the Holocaust, "The Last Days," carries a double meaning for survivor Tom Lantos. "Not just the last days of the war. It is the last days for us . . . survivors of the Holocaust. Soon we will be no more," says Lantos, now a California congressman from the San Mateo-San Francisco area.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning this winter, thousands of Jewish survivors of the Holocaust will receive monthly payments from Hungary under a landmark agreement to ease Jewish suffering from World War II. Nearly 50 years late in coming, the deal is being hailed by some Jewish and government leaders as a model for Eastern Europe, where most of the 6 million Jewish victims of the Holocaust perished but few governments have settled accounts with devastated communities.
NEWS
May 10, 1992
George Mandel-Mantello, 90, a businessman who helped stop Nazi deportation of thousands of Jews from Hungary during World War II. Born a Jew in Romania, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Mandel-Mantello was an "unsung hero" of the war, said David Kranzler, history professor emeritus at the City University of New York.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | Reuters
The Soviet Union was willing to trade captured Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg after World War II for Soviet citizens who had defected to Sweden, but Stockholm turned down the offer, a Swedish newspaper said Wednesday. Wallenberg, credited with saving thousands of Jews in Hungary from Nazi death camps by granting them protection under the neutral Swedish flag or by issuing false passports, was last seen when he was arrested in 1945 by Soviet troops in Budapest, the capital.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
In an international event, the "Italian Wallenberg" who posed as a Spanish diplomat in Hungary during World War II became an honorary Israeli citizen in a ceremony at the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial at Jerusalem. Historians say Giorgio Perlasca, now 79, saved 6,000 Jews from the Nazi Holocaust. Perlasca was a livestock dealer for an Italian firm in Hungary when he took a staff job at the Spanish Embassy.
NEWS
August 19, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over Vatican objections, the heirs of a Jewish community decimated by the Holocaust publicly rebuked visiting Pope John Paul II here Sunday for the silence of his church in Hungary during the tragic years of World War II.
NEWS
July 12, 1989
The World Jewish Congress, which opened its first office in a Communist country this week, could open one in the Soviet Union in the near future, the group's president said. The new office, opened Monday in Budapest, Hungary, is designed to work with Hungary's 80,000 Jews and with the small Jewish populations in other East European countries outside the Soviet Union. "My guess is that (we) will have an office in the Soviet Union within the next two years," Edgar M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1988 | KATHERINE M. GRIFFIN, Times Staff Writer
During the darkest days of the Holocaust, Dr. Laszlo Petrovicz was a steady beacon of light for Jews in Budapest. As a Hungarian army doctor assigned to a Jewish labor colony, he helped dozens of captives escape under the guise of sending them to medical specialists. He and his Jewish wife, Zsuszanna, a nurse, provided food and medical care to Jews in Budapest's ghetto. They obtained false identification papers for many and hid others in their own home, written testimonies from survivors say.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel publicly protested Friday a decision by Hungary to cut off charter flights from Budapest for Soviet immigrants because of terrorist threats. Hungary's state airline, Malev, also asked the Soviet company Aeroflot to stop flying Soviet Jews to Hungary on the way to Israel. Israeli Foreign Minister Moshe Arens asked for clarifications of the moves. Some officials in the government of Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir are suspicious that Hungary cut off the flights for diplomatic reasons.
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