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Jews India

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NEWS
March 16, 2000 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One civilization after another has found paradise in this seaside town, planted its flag and then faded away. The Jews of Cochin, remnants of an old spice-trading outpost on India's southwestern coast, are down to their last few members. Their ancestors began arriving here in the 1300s, many at the end of long flights from repression in Europe and the Middle East. They built a world of their own and crammed much of it into the narrow byway still known as Jew Town Road.
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NEWS
March 16, 2000 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One civilization after another has found paradise in this seaside town, planted its flag and then faded away. The Jews of Cochin, remnants of an old spice-trading outpost on India's southwestern coast, are down to their last few members. Their ancestors began arriving here in the 1300s, many at the end of long flights from repression in Europe and the Middle East. They built a world of their own and crammed much of it into the narrow byway still known as Jew Town Road.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1989 | From Religious News Service
About 4,300 tribal people in northeastern India who claim to be Jews are becoming increasingly restive because of Israel's refusal to grant visas to these alleged descendants of one of the 10 lost tribes of Israel. Israeli Rabbi Eliezer Avihail, head of the Amisha organization which tries to help Jews immigrate to Israel, has visited the self-proclaimed Indian Jews in Mizoram and Manipur at least four times in the past decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1989 | From Religious News Service
About 4,300 tribal people in northeastern India who claim to be Jews are becoming increasingly restive because of Israel's refusal to grant visas to these alleged descendants of one of the 10 lost tribes of Israel. Israeli Rabbi Eliezer Avihail, head of the Amisha organization which tries to help Jews immigrate to Israel, has visited the self-proclaimed Indian Jews in Mizoram and Manipur at least four times in the past decade.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | RUTH PITCHFORD, REUTERS
Far away from the holy wars among Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs, palm trees shade an outpost of the Jewish Diaspora where India offers its citizens religious tolerance. "An American student sent a questionnaire asking why our young people had left for Israel," said tax consultant and lawyer Jacob Cohen, wearing an Indian dhoti, the loosely wrapped cloth covering the lower half of the body. "I just wrote: 'Lunacy.'
FOOD
March 24, 1991 | JULIE SAHNI
On the tropical west coast of India, tucked away amid the vast Hindu population, there is a tiny but ancient community of Jews. You won't find chopped liver, potato pancakes or brisket of beef there, nor matzo ball soup. They serve molagachi (mahogany chicken with black pepper), ellegal (spice-rubbed fish in cool herb salsa), masalachi (mutton braised with garlic and coriander) and appam (coconut crepes with date sauce).
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