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NEWS
July 2, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case that has put Iran's judicial system on trial and strained its relations with the West, an Iranian court Saturday found 10 Jews guilty of taking part in a spy ring for Israel and sentenced them to prison terms ranging from four to 13 years. Two Muslims also were convicted of abetting the group.
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NEWS
February 8, 2001 | From Reuters
Iran's Supreme Court has denied an appeal from 10 Iranian Jews jailed after being convicted of spying for Israel, the state IRNA news agency reported Wednesday. It quoted a statement by the prosecutor's office as saying that the Supreme Court decided not to hear the case after three judges studied the appeal and found it to have no legal basis.
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NEWS
May 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A suspect in Iran's Jewish spy trial pleaded not guilty Wednesday, becoming the first of seven defendants heard so far to deny the state's allegations of membership in an Israeli spy ring. Farzad Kashi told the closed-door session of the Revolutionary Court that he was not guilty of passing material to Israeli intelligence, his lawyer told reporters after the hearing.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi denied that he had promised Western diplomats that some of the 10 Iranian Jews convicted in July of spying for Israel would be released when an appeals court reviewed their sentences. The sentences were reduced Thursday to terms ranging from two to nine years. The sentences in July ranged from four to 13 years. U.S. and European officials said Kharrazi had promised diplomats at the U.N. Millennium Summit this month that some defendants would be released.
NEWS
July 7, 1999 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 18 months of tentative overtures between Iran and the United States, prospects for rapprochement have been seriously endangered by the arrest of 13 Iranian Jews on charges of spying for Israel and the United States, according to U.S. officials. The arrests, which occurred several months ago but were not revealed publicly until last month, threaten to become a cause celebre of the magnitude of the Salman Rushdie case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2000 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The televised confession of an Iranian Jew charged with spying for Israel and the United States was nothing more than a scripted sham, leaders of Los Angeles' Jewish community said Tuesday. "If this is not a sham trial, I don't know what is," said George Haroonian of the Council of Iranian American Jewish Organizations. "This so-called confession was well orchestrated to show to the world that what the judicial authorities in Iran are claiming is right," he said.
NEWS
October 2, 1999 | Washington Post
Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi gave indirect assurances Friday that his country will not execute 13 Iranian Jews accused of spying for the United States and Israel. Kharrazi, in New York for the U.N. General Assembly, told reporters that the Iranian judiciary has pledged a fair trial for all those accused of espionage, who include Iranian Muslims as well as the 13 Jews.
NEWS
February 8, 2001 | From Reuters
Iran's Supreme Court has denied an appeal from 10 Iranian Jews jailed after being convicted of spying for Israel, the state IRNA news agency reported Wednesday. It quoted a statement by the prosecutor's office as saying that the Supreme Court decided not to hear the case after three judges studied the appeal and found it to have no legal basis.
NEWS
April 14, 2000 | Times Wire Services
The trial of 13 Iranian Jews accused of spying for Israel and the U.S. adjourned quickly after it began Thursday, with defense attorneys saying that they need more time. A senior judicial official said later that four of the 13 had confessed. Concern over the trial brought Western diplomats, foreign journalists and a human rights activist to the courthouse in Shiraz, about 420 miles south of Tehran. The U.S. and Israel say charges that the Jews spied for the two countries are baseless.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi denied that he had promised Western diplomats that some of the 10 Iranian Jews convicted in July of spying for Israel would be released when an appeals court reviewed their sentences. The sentences were reduced Thursday to terms ranging from two to nine years. The sentences in July ranged from four to 13 years. U.S. and European officials said Kharrazi had promised diplomats at the U.N. Millennium Summit this month that some defendants would be released.
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prospects for rapprochement between the United States and Iran suffered a major setback Thursday when Tehran reneged on a behind-the-scenes diplomatic pledge involving 10 Iranian Jews convicted of spying for Israel, according to U.S. officials and European diplomats. Although an Iranian appeals court on Thursday reduced the prison sentences of the 10 Jews, its action fell short of what U.S. officials said they had been led to believe would occur.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case that has put Iran's judicial system on trial and strained its relations with the West, an Iranian court Saturday found 10 Jews guilty of taking part in a spy ring for Israel and sentenced them to prison terms ranging from four to 13 years. Two Muslims also were convicted of abetting the group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2000 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON and EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hours after a senior Iranian court official declared an end to courtroom proceedings for 13 Jews accused of spying for Israel, more than 400 Angelenos gathered for a candlelight vigil half a world away to renew their demand that the prisoners be released. They, like the U.S. and Israeli governments and officials in several European nations, contend that the charges against the 13 men are baseless.
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
None of the 13 Iranian Jews charged with spying for Israel faces the death penalty, the head of the local judiciary said Monday, addressing one of the biggest fears of human rights groups and Western governments. Hossein Ali Amiri told a news briefing after the day's closed-door hearing in the southern city of Shiraz that the suspects had not been charged under Iran's Islamic law with mohareb, or taking up arms against God and the state.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A suspect in Iran's Jewish spy trial pleaded not guilty Wednesday, becoming the first of seven defendants heard so far to deny the state's allegations of membership in an Israeli spy ring. Farzad Kashi told the closed-door session of the Revolutionary Court that he was not guilty of passing material to Israeli intelligence, his lawyer told reporters after the hearing.
NEWS
May 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two more defendants confessed Monday in the trial of 13 Iranian Jews accused of spying for Israel, officials said, while their lawyers were shown the state's evidence for the first time in the closed-door proceedings. The new confessions raise to five the number of defendants who reportedly have admitted to espionage. But defense lawyers have questioned the admissions before Iran's Revolutionary Court, where there is no jury and the judge also is the prosecutor.
NEWS
May 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two more Iranian Jews said Wednesday that they spied for Israel, bringing to three the number of defendants who have confessed to espionage in a trial that has attracted international concern. Defense lawyers for the 13 Jews on trial questioned the validity of the confessions and criticized the court, in which the judge also acts as prosecutor. Israel condemned the latest confessions as "loathsome." It denies that any of the defendants are spies.
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
None of the 13 Iranian Jews charged with spying for Israel faces the death penalty, the head of the local judiciary said Monday, addressing one of the biggest fears of human rights groups and Western governments. Hossein Ali Amiri told a news briefing after the day's closed-door hearing in the southern city of Shiraz that the suspects had not been charged under Iran's Islamic law with mohareb, or taking up arms against God and the state.
NEWS
May 4, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two more Iranian Jews said Wednesday that they spied for Israel, bringing to three the number of defendants who have confessed to espionage in a trial that has attracted international concern. Defense lawyers for the 13 Jews on trial questioned the validity of the confessions and criticized the court, in which the judge also acts as prosecutor. Israel condemned the latest confessions as "loathsome." It denies that any of the defendants are spies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2000 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The televised confession of an Iranian Jew charged with spying for Israel and the United States was nothing more than a scripted sham, leaders of Los Angeles' Jewish community said Tuesday. "If this is not a sham trial, I don't know what is," said George Haroonian of the Council of Iranian American Jewish Organizations. "This so-called confession was well orchestrated to show to the world that what the judicial authorities in Iran are claiming is right," he said.
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