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NEWS
April 7, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A second bomb attack in four days by extremists in the Latvian capital, Riga, damaged property at the Russian Embassy on Monday and prompted Moscow to warn that "fascists are raising their heads" in the former Soviet republic. As with Thursday's predawn explosion at Riga's synagogue, no injuries were reported in the embassy blast, caused by plastic explosives detonated in a concrete trash bin outside the facility.
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NEWS
December 20, 1998 | From Associated Press
Jack Ratz closes his eyes and he is a boy again, running with his brothers along the streets of Riga, Latvia. They are playing stickball down the street from their house, which doubles as their father's tailor shop. Their mother is calling them to get cleaned up for dinner. Then the nightmare takes over. Tanks rumble into the city, cracking the stone streets. Jack and his family are herded into a ghetto. Firing squads kill his mother and brothers; their bodies are buried in unmarked mass graves.
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NEWS
December 20, 1998 | From Associated Press
Jack Ratz closes his eyes and he is a boy again, running with his brothers along the streets of Riga, Latvia. They are playing stickball down the street from their house, which doubles as their father's tailor shop. Their mother is calling them to get cleaned up for dinner. Then the nightmare takes over. Tanks rumble into the city, cracking the stone streets. Jack and his family are herded into a ghetto. Firing squads kill his mother and brothers; their bodies are buried in unmarked mass graves.
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A second bomb attack in four days by extremists in the Latvian capital, Riga, damaged property at the Russian Embassy on Monday and prompted Moscow to warn that "fascists are raising their heads" in the former Soviet republic. As with Thursday's predawn explosion at Riga's synagogue, no injuries were reported in the embassy blast, caused by plastic explosives detonated in a concrete trash bin outside the facility.
NEWS
April 6, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shards of glass lay scattered on the cobblestone street. The synagogue's heavy oak door and stained-glass windows, destroyed by a bomb, were sealed with wood and plastic against the cold. And as police guarded the building this weekend, four dozen Jews met inside to pray and discuss why, once again, they had become the target of hatred in Latvia. "This was clearly an anti-Semitic act," said Lubavitch Rabbi Mordechai Glazman. "We will not be intimidated.
NEWS
November 19, 1986 | Associated Press
Sweden will not take action against 12 people identified by the Nazi-hunting Simon Wiesenthal Center as suspected war criminals, authorities said today. Officials at the center said the 12 people, who are believed to be living in Sweden, were suspected of participating in Nazi crimes against Jews in Latvia and Estonia after those Baltic states were occupied by the German army in 1941. (Story on Page 14.
NEWS
January 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
A Nazi war crimes suspect, thrown out of several countries on suspicion of participating in mass killings, arrived Friday in his adopted home country, Australia. Konrad Kalejs arrived in Melbourne on a Singapore Airlines flight. At the airport, dozens of Jewish students gathered to protest what they said was the government's failure to do more to investigate the allegations against him. "We're here to prove that he's not welcome here," said one protester.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1999
As the son of a Latvian Jew whose family was almost entirely annihilated by Latvian and German Nazis during World War II, I feel I have the right to discuss the murder of my people, a right Peteris Gaide seems to question (Letters, Jan. 31). After exhaustively researching my play "Riga" in the United States, Germany, Russia and Latvia, I can honestly say that, with very few but notable exceptions, the Latvian Christian population were by and large either eagerly cooperative with their Nazi overlords during the Holocaust or utterly indifferent.
NEWS
January 15, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Making his first trip to reunited Germany, President Ezer Weizman of Israel visited a former Nazi concentration camp and urged young people to make the next century better than this one. After being greeted with military honors at a Berlin airport by German President Roman Herzog, Weizman made a first stop at the Sachsenhausen camp, just north of the city. About 100,000 people--thousands of them Jews--were killed at the camp under Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler.
NEWS
June 17, 1986 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, in a setback for civil rights forces, refused Monday to bar officials from dismantling a 15-year-old cross-town busing program used to desegregate public elementary schools in Norfolk, Va. The court turned down an emergency plea from a group of black parents for an injunction that would require busing to continue next fall, until the justices act on their appeal of a lower court ruling approving a new plan that assigns students to the schools nearest their homes.
NEWS
April 6, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shards of glass lay scattered on the cobblestone street. The synagogue's heavy oak door and stained-glass windows, destroyed by a bomb, were sealed with wood and plastic against the cold. And as police guarded the building this weekend, four dozen Jews met inside to pray and discuss why, once again, they had become the target of hatred in Latvia. "This was clearly an anti-Semitic act," said Lubavitch Rabbi Mordechai Glazman. "We will not be intimidated.
BOOKS
March 6, 1988 | Ruth Broyde-Sharon
To Palestine or Israel or . . . the United States. The United States counts for more than any other third nation in this protracted struggle, not just because of American Jews who have become Israelis but also because of Palestinians and Israelis who have become Americans. "If I forget thee, O Jerusalem. . . ." We need not insist on how nationality is gained or lost or changed or doubled. People who began there are now living here, and vice versa.
TRAVEL
October 15, 2000 | MARTIN HOLLANDER, Martin Hollander is an editor at Newsday
Given their history, it's little wonder Lithuanians, Latvians and Estonians often seem so sour. Bullied since the early 13th century by Germans, Swedes, Poles and Russians, they share a past--particularly their Soviet past--that's a much-gnawed bitter root. Of course, there have been Lithuanians, Latvians and Estonians who didn't forgo, especially in World War II, their opportunities to victimize--a thought that lurked in my mind throughout a fascinating eight-day July tour of the republics.
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