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NEWS
September 11, 1991 | From Reuters
This nation on Tuesday proposed working with Israel to ensure that criminals who took part in the World War II massacre of 200,000 Jews in Lithuania are not rehabilitated. The Vilnius government, which recently won independence from Moscow, has been angered by U.S. reports that war criminals are being exonerated wholesale through its program to rehabilitate people condemned for resisting Nazi occupation or Soviet rule. But the government admitted that mistakes may have been made.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2001 | From Associated Press
Anton Gecas, wanted in Lithuania on charges of war crimes against Jews during World War II, died Wednesday in a Scottish hospital before he could be brought to trial. The 85-year-old Gecas, who moved to Britain in 1947, had suffered two strokes. He died at Liberton Hospital in Edinburgh. Lithuania asked Scotland in March to extradite the Lithuanian-born Gecas, who had been living in the Scottish capital.
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NEWS
September 24, 1991 | MICHAEL HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its peaked roof and tiny, overgrown garden, the synagogue on Pylimo Street was never the most fashionable in the city or the richest or most learned. Today its claim to importance is that it is the only one left in town. Even so, it is not easy to fill. Many are the Sabbaths on which services cannot be held for want of a minyan, the minimum 10 adult men necessary for organized prayer. Last Saturday, 13 men turned out, although there was no rabbi and no women.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A member of a Nazi-sponsored Lithuanian battalion blamed for the killing of nearly 20,000 Jews has returned to his homeland after U.S. courts ordered his deportation, officials said. Juozas Naujalis, 81, a retired Chicago-area machinist, flew to Lithuania on March 15. Lithuanian prosecutors disclosed his arrival this week. Naujalis, a U.S.
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The trial of alleged Lithuanian war criminal Aleksandras Lileikis was postponed until May, prompting anger from Nazi hunters. Lileikis, 91 and in ill health, is alleged to have signed orders handing Jews to Nazi death squads when he headed the Vilnius security police in World War II. He denies the charges.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Battered by a storm of international criticism as it re-emerges as an independent country, Lithuania's government Wednesday strongly denied charges that it is deliberately clearing many of its citizens of complicity in Nazi war crimes against Jews. A leading American Jewish organization, however, reaffirmed earlier assertions that it held proof of at least two such rehabilitations and expects to receive evidence soon that more than 100 Nazi war criminals have been cleared of wrongdoing.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A member of a Nazi-sponsored Lithuanian battalion blamed for the killing of nearly 20,000 Jews has returned to his homeland after U.S. courts ordered his deportation, officials said. Juozas Naujalis, 81, a retired Chicago-area machinist, flew to Lithuania on March 15. Lithuanian prosecutors disclosed his arrival this week. Naujalis, a U.S.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The making of the man known as "Japan's Oskar Schindler" started this way: At 5:15 on a chilly summer morning in 1940, Chiune Sugihara awoke to the sound of a low rumble outside. He was no industrialist, like the German who saved more than 1,000 Jews by employing them in his factories, a story captured in the movie "Schindler's List." Rather, Sugihara was Japan's consul general in Lithuania.
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | Times staff and wire reports
Nearly two years after losing his U.S. citizenship, Kazys Gimzauskas was indicted Friday for his alleged role in the murder of Lithuanian Jews during World War II. The indictment came just days before the start of the trial of Aleksandras Lileikis, the first person to be prosecuted for Nazi war crimes in any of the successor states of the former Soviet Union. Gimzauskas, 89, was a deputy to Lileikis, who was chief of security police in Vilnius, the Lithuanian capital, during the Nazi occupation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1991
In response to "In Defense of a Nation Falsely Singled Out," by Aleksandras Shtromas, Commentary, Sept. 24: Shtromas tries to minimize the role of Lithuanians as Nazi collaborators during the Holocaust. He also makes the extraordinary statement that there was no violence against Jews in Lithuania for 600 years. This statement contravenes historical fact. My late grandmother left Lithuania at the turn of the century because of the violence, as did many members of her family and friends.
NEWS
October 20, 2000 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese diplomat Chiune Sugihara, who issued visas that saved the lives of thousands of Jews during World War II, has long been considered a hero outside Japan: Lithuania named a street after him, Israel recognized him as a "righteous Gentile," and the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington is presenting a special exhibition on his efforts. In his own nation, however, some government authorities have apparently considered Sugihara more renegade than hero.
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The trial of alleged Lithuanian war criminal Aleksandras Lileikis was postponed until May, prompting anger from Nazi hunters. Lileikis, 91 and in ill health, is alleged to have signed orders handing Jews to Nazi death squads when he headed the Vilnius security police in World War II. He denies the charges.
NEWS
February 28, 1998 | Times staff and wire reports
Nearly two years after losing his U.S. citizenship, Kazys Gimzauskas was indicted Friday for his alleged role in the murder of Lithuanian Jews during World War II. The indictment came just days before the start of the trial of Aleksandras Lileikis, the first person to be prosecuted for Nazi war crimes in any of the successor states of the former Soviet Union. Gimzauskas, 89, was a deputy to Lileikis, who was chief of security police in Vilnius, the Lithuanian capital, during the Nazi occupation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996
Hiroki Sugihara was only 5 when his father, a Japanese diplomat, went against his country's warnings and issued visas to thousands of Polish Jews, saving them from the Nazis in World War II. Now, the son is on a tour of the United States and Canada to tell the story of his father, Chiune Sugihara. "He was a humanitarian," Sugihara said. "He was aware that he would lose his career, but he said he had to do this, he had to help these people."
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The making of the man known as "Japan's Oskar Schindler" started this way: At 5:15 on a chilly summer morning in 1940, Chiune Sugihara awoke to the sound of a low rumble outside. He was no industrialist, like the German who saved more than 1,000 Jews by employing them in his factories, a story captured in the movie "Schindler's List." Rather, Sugihara was Japan's consul general in Lithuania.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1991
Whether Deborah Lurya (letter, Oct. 11) likes it or not, it is a plain fact that till June, 1941, there were in Lithuania no Jewish pogroms, i.e., random killings of Jews initiated and perpetrated by the local population. As for her late grandmother's recollections, they surely relate to the discrimination and persecution of Jews in the Russian empire, an integral part of which Lithuania at the turn of the century had been.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996
Hiroki Sugihara was only 5 when his father, a Japanese diplomat, went against his country's warnings and issued visas to thousands of Polish Jews, saving them from the Nazis in World War II. Now, the son is on a tour of the United States and Canada to tell the story of his father, Chiune Sugihara. "He was a humanitarian," Sugihara said. "He was aware that he would lose his career, but he said he had to do this, he had to help these people."
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | MICHAEL HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its peaked roof and tiny, overgrown garden, the synagogue on Pylimo Street was never the most fashionable in the city or the richest or most learned. Today its claim to importance is that it is the only one left in town. Even so, it is not easy to fill. Many are the Sabbaths on which services cannot be held for want of a minyan, the minimum 10 adult men necessary for organized prayer. Last Saturday, 13 men turned out, although there was no rabbi and no women.
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