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Jews Los Angeles

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
It seemed innocuous enough: a code of ethics to avoid stereotypes, repudiate violence and govern debate between Muslims and Jews in Southern California. But when two leading Muslim officials--Maher Hathout and Salam Al-Marayati--proposed the code last year, their involvement became a lightning rod for attacks by major Jewish organizations, which argued that the men actually condoned terrorism.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1999
Though unable to resist a pinch here, a poke there, and even a few mock punches and explosive giggles, the 370 students seated at the edge of the tombstones at Mt. Sinai cemetery Thursday said they took their mission very seriously. "You have to keep the Jewish tradition alive," said 10-year-old Matan Cafri, a fifth-grader at Kadima Hebrew School in Woodland Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1999 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
The oldest synagogue structure in the San Fernando Valley--Adat Ari El's David Familian Chapel--will be designated as a California State Point of Historical Interest on Sunday, exactly 50 years after the building was dedicated. The chapel, with its many stained-glass windows depicting Jewish holidays, has always had a warm feeling, said Rabbi Moshe Rothblum, who has been with the 900-family Conservative synagogue since 1971. "It has a sense of history that this is where it all began," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1999
Sprawled at the top of the Sepulveda Pass with a spectacular view of the brushy hills and city below, Milken Community High School is among the nation's largest non-Orthodox Jewish high schools. At the college-like campus, ancient Jewish traditions share class time with such modern disciplines as robotics and biotechnology. The 10-acre campus cost nearly $40 million to build.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shelves were almost empty in the final days of Zellman's Menswear in Boyle Heights. About a dozen men's jackets hung from the racks and some baseball caps lined the wall. Shoes were going for 99 cents; pants were half off. Even the headless mannequins were for sale. After 78 years in business, the landmark Cesar Chavez Avenue clothing shop cleared out its merchandise and closed its doors Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1999 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In a jarring juxtaposition of the sacred and profane, the recent spate of anti-Semitic violence is shaping the prayers, sermons and physical security measures taken by the Jewish faithful as they begin the High Holy Days--the 10-day period of penitence that begins tonight. Many community leaders stress the need to react with prudence, not panic.
NEWS
September 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
Edward Alpert had heard stories of Jewish persecution and knew anti-Semitism persisted. But he had never been afraid of being a target until a 21-year-old white supremacist shot and wounded six Jews just a few miles from Alpert's synagogue. As Jews prepare for their most sacred time of year--the High Holy Days, which start Friday at sundown with Rosh Hashana and run through Yom Kippur on Sept. 20--synagogues across the country will be on alert, with armed guards and security cameras.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1999 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to address a conspicuous stumbling block among schoolchildren, Los Angeles Jewish leaders Wednesday unveiled a campaign to assist hundreds of struggling readers at area elementary schools. About 350 volunteers will spend one hour each week over the next school year reading side by side with children at 30 campuses in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Koreh L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1999 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congregants arriving at a synagogue in East Hollywood on Saturday were confronted with a swastika and the words "Jews die" spray-painted on the front of the building overnight. Many of those who attend services at Temple Knesset Israel on Vermont Avenue are elderly Holocaust survivors who were horrified by the act of hatred. Officers from the Los Angeles Police Department's Northeast station documented the vandalism and notified the department's criminal conspiracy section.
NEWS
August 15, 1999 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three decades ago, federal authorities claimed wide-ranging and often-abusive powers in the name of national security as FBI agents trailed, harassed and threatened liberal demonstrators, black militants and many others whose ideas were deemed dangerous. Today, the pendulum has swung so far away from the abuses of the J. Edgar Hoover era that authorities are wary of proceeding against an extremist group without a "reasonable indication" of criminal activity.
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