Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJews New York State
IN THE NEWS

Jews New York State

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Monday night in the Borscht Belt, and a freak summer fog hangs over the Catskill Mountains, heavy as a potato pancake. In the nightclub of the old Granit Hotel, a pooped crowd of senior citizens waits for the King of Shtick to arrive. Suddenly, a four-piece band wakes them up with "Smile Though You're Heart Is Breaking," and Mal Z. Lawrence struts on stage like some wise guy at a bar mitzvah. "Food is a big thing here in the Catskills, isn't it?"
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 10, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is not surprising that one of the first things Hillary Rodham Clinton did after Al Gore's historic announcement of his running mate was to dial 911 for Joseph I. Lieberman. After a year of traveling from New York state's pristine dairy country hamlets to its leafy suburbs and teeming inner-city neighborhoods, Mrs. Clinton remains stuck in political quicksand. To bolster her bid for the U.S.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 10, 2000 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is not surprising that one of the first things Hillary Rodham Clinton did after Al Gore's historic announcement of his running mate was to dial 911 for Joseph I. Lieberman. After a year of traveling from New York state's pristine dairy country hamlets to its leafy suburbs and teeming inner-city neighborhoods, Mrs. Clinton remains stuck in political quicksand. To bolster her bid for the U.S.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Solid showings with the core Democratic constituencies of blacks, Jews and senior citizens carried Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton to victory in the New York primary, despite significant doubts about his integrity, a Los Angeles Times exit poll found. In driving to victory through repeated controversies about his past, Clinton again demonstrated Tuesday a powerful ability to assemble the historic Democratic base of blacks and working-class whites--overcoming a challenge from former California Gov.
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Jesse Jackson sought Sunday to emphasize what he said was the "real New York agenda" of crumbling infrastructure and rampant homelessness, but found himself confronted by continuing criticism from Jewish leaders about his views on Israel and the Middle East.
NEWS
April 13, 1988 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A top official of a key national Jewish organization charged Tuesday that the perception of the Rev. Jesse Jackson's advisers that Jewish groups only were interested in harassing Jackson and not according him a fair hearing was "false, unfortunate and offensive." Malcolm Hoenlein, executive director of the Conference of Major American Jewish Organizations, singled out Gerald F. Austin, Jackson's presidential campaign manager, as adhering to that view.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis handily won the bitterly contested New York primary Tuesday, capturing most of the second-largest delegation to the Democratic National Convention and taking a giant step toward his party's presidential nomination. The Rev. Jesse Jackson, though he carried the city of New York by a narrow margin and won about 90% of the black vote statewide, finished second. Tennessee Sen. Albert Gore Jr.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Staff Writer
Climaxing the nastiest primary campaign of the year, New York whites--especially Jews--coalesced strongly behind Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis on Tuesday to overwhelm solid black support for the Rev. Jesse Jackson, the Los Angeles Times Poll found. One indication of the deep schism between New York voter blocs was that 8 in 10 Jews interviewed in the poll asserted that Jackson is "anti-Semitic."
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Solid showings with the core Democratic constituencies of blacks, Jews and senior citizens carried Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton to victory in the New York primary, despite significant doubts about his integrity, a Los Angeles Times exit poll found. In driving to victory through repeated controversies about his past, Clinton again demonstrated Tuesday a powerful ability to assemble the historic Democratic base of blacks and working-class whites--overcoming a challenge from former California Gov.
NEWS
April 11, 1988 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
As Sen. Albert Gore Jr. pins his hopes on marshaling this city's enormous Jewish vote, some potential supporters are struggling with mixed feelings about the Tennessee Democrat: They like his pro-Israel record and rhetoric but fear that voting for Gore in the April 19 New York primary will indirectly help the Rev. Jesse Jackson, whose relations with Jews have been stormy.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Monday night in the Borscht Belt, and a freak summer fog hangs over the Catskill Mountains, heavy as a potato pancake. In the nightclub of the old Granit Hotel, a pooped crowd of senior citizens waits for the King of Shtick to arrive. Suddenly, a four-piece band wakes them up with "Smile Though You're Heart Is Breaking," and Mal Z. Lawrence struts on stage like some wise guy at a bar mitzvah. "Food is a big thing here in the Catskills, isn't it?"
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Edward I. Koch's trademark for years has been asking New Yorkers: "How am I doing?" The verdict after the Empire State's bitter and racially divisive Democratic presidential primary may be: "Don't ask." Koch, who backed Tennessee Sen. Albert Gore Jr., was forced to concede Wednesday that his unceasingly sharp attacks on the Rev. Jesse Jackson had backfired.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | ROBERT SHOGAN, Times Political Writer
Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis handily won the bitterly contested New York primary Tuesday, capturing most of the second-largest delegation to the Democratic National Convention and taking a giant step toward his party's presidential nomination. The Rev. Jesse Jackson, though he carried the city of New York by a narrow margin and won about 90% of the black vote statewide, finished second. Tennessee Sen. Albert Gore Jr.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Staff Writer
Climaxing the nastiest primary campaign of the year, New York whites--especially Jews--coalesced strongly behind Massachusetts Gov. Michael S. Dukakis on Tuesday to overwhelm solid black support for the Rev. Jesse Jackson, the Los Angeles Times Poll found. One indication of the deep schism between New York voter blocs was that 8 in 10 Jews interviewed in the poll asserted that Jackson is "anti-Semitic."
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
The Rev. Jesse Jackson sought Sunday to emphasize what he said was the "real New York agenda" of crumbling infrastructure and rampant homelessness, but found himself confronted by continuing criticism from Jewish leaders about his views on Israel and the Middle East.
NEWS
April 13, 1988 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A top official of a key national Jewish organization charged Tuesday that the perception of the Rev. Jesse Jackson's advisers that Jewish groups only were interested in harassing Jackson and not according him a fair hearing was "false, unfortunate and offensive." Malcolm Hoenlein, executive director of the Conference of Major American Jewish Organizations, singled out Gerald F. Austin, Jackson's presidential campaign manager, as adhering to that view.
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Edward I. Koch's trademark for years has been asking New Yorkers: "How am I doing?" The verdict after the Empire State's bitter and racially divisive Democratic presidential primary may be: "Don't ask." Koch, who backed Tennessee Sen. Albert Gore Jr., was forced to concede Wednesday that his unceasingly sharp attacks on the Rev. Jesse Jackson had backfired.
NEWS
January 8, 1985 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Israeli government leaders tried desperately Monday to defuse a political controversy over the interrupted campaign to rescue Ethiopian Jews and pledged to do all in their power to save those Ethiopians still stranded in East Africa. "We shall not rest . . . until all our brothers and sisters from Ethiopia will come safely back home," Prime Minister Shimon Peres said at a Hebrew University symposium.
NEWS
April 11, 1988 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
As Sen. Albert Gore Jr. pins his hopes on marshaling this city's enormous Jewish vote, some potential supporters are struggling with mixed feelings about the Tennessee Democrat: They like his pro-Israel record and rhetoric but fear that voting for Gore in the April 19 New York primary will indirectly help the Rev. Jesse Jackson, whose relations with Jews have been stormy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|