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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1999 | Reuters
Immigration by Jews from Russia to Israel rose significantly in the first half of 1999, Israel's Central Bureau of Statistics said Thursday. The bureau said 12,190 Jews from Russia came to Israel in the first six months of the year, an increase of 130% compared with the same period last year. Earlier this year, the quasi-governmental Jewish Agency attributed a rise in newcomers from Russia to the economic crisis there and a rise in anti-Semitism.
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WORLD
May 30, 2002 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just days after President Bush praised Russia for religious tolerance, two anti- Semitic attacks have sent shock waves through the country's Jewish community. On Monday, a hand-lettered sign containing a hateful message toward Jews was erected along a highway about 20 miles outside Moscow. It exploded when a driver stopped her car and attempted to tear the sign down.
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NEWS
March 24, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Visitors strolling the sidewalks of the Tamarack Woods Apartments are likely to encounter a melange of unusual smells. There is the spicy aroma of kotlely , a delectable dish made of ground meat. Or the sweet-smelling fragrance of pirozhky , a doughy baked concoction filled with meat, apples, cabbage and potatoes. "It smells like something I've never smelled before," said Pamela Marrocco, manager of the apartment complex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1999 | Reuters
Immigration by Jews from Russia to Israel rose significantly in the first half of 1999, Israel's Central Bureau of Statistics said Thursday. The bureau said 12,190 Jews from Russia came to Israel in the first six months of the year, an increase of 130% compared with the same period last year. Earlier this year, the quasi-governmental Jewish Agency attributed a rise in newcomers from Russia to the economic crisis there and a rise in anti-Semitism.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Isaac Mankin, 53, a senior scientist in the southern Russian city of Saratov, applied to emigrate from the Soviet Union 2 1/2 years ago, he expected that it would be quick and simple because, after decades of trouble, Jews were finally leaving by the thousands for Israel. "The refusenik era was over--even the biggest scientists could go," said Dr. Anna Mankin, a daughter. "We thought there was no possibility of our being turned down.
NEWS
December 22, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The happiness of Alexander Lerner overflows from his small office in the basement of the Weizmann Institute of Science here and virtually envelops all who pass. The warm and ebullient Lerner quickly ticks off the reasons for his joy. A coronary pump, the result of 20 years' research on an artificial heart, is ready for trial use. He lives in a comfortable flat with his son and daughter-in-law; his daughter is just down the street. He cannot think of any unmet material needs.
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | Associated Press
Using both airplanes and overland routes, Israel has evacuated nearly all the Jews from strife-torn Chechnya, Jewish sources said Monday. Hundreds left the secessionist Russian republic, the last several dozen amid fierce fighting between Russian forces and Chechen rebels. The capital, Grozny, was the most difficult area to evacuate Jews from, said the sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1992 | HOWARD BLUME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They remembered surviving on black bread and water, and embracing American troops in victory at the Elbe River in Germany. They also remembered fighting side by side with troops who sometimes ridiculed Jews. And at their "Veterans Day" gathering in West Hollywood on Sunday, these Jewish World War II survivors drank vodka, attacked the chicken Kiev and clasped old comrades with Russian bear hugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1998 | Religion News Service
Russian President Boris Yeltsin's appearance this week at the opening of a new $10-million synagogue at Moscow's huge war memorial complex was an unqualified triumph for Russia's Jews. The Memorial Synagogue includes Russia's first permanent exhibit acknowledging the Nazi Holocaust. In joining a Russian Orthodox church and mosque at the war memorial park, the new synagogue becomes a clear symbol that Russia's Jews are a religious and political force to be reckoned with.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite occasional outbreaks of right-wing extremism and much public anguish about how to preserve the memory of the Holocaust, Germany now has the fastest-growing Jewish population outside Israel. However, the growing tide of Jewish immigration here is less a tribute to German social harmony than a troubling sign that anti-Semitism is on the rise elsewhere.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite occasional outbreaks of right-wing extremism and much public anguish about how to preserve the memory of the Holocaust, Germany now has the fastest-growing Jewish population outside Israel. However, the growing tide of Jewish immigration here is less a tribute to German social harmony than a troubling sign that anti-Semitism is on the rise elsewhere.
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the midst of economic collapse, Russia has at least one growth industry: hatred. In recent weeks, following time-dishonored tradition, some Russians have been loudly and crudely blaming the country's woes on Jews. The new wave of anti-Semitism is not just gutter talk. Diatribes laced with ethnic slurs have echoed repeatedly in Russia's highest forums--on national television, in front of the Kremlin and in parliament.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1998 | Religion News Service
Russian President Boris Yeltsin's appearance this week at the opening of a new $10-million synagogue at Moscow's huge war memorial complex was an unqualified triumph for Russia's Jews. The Memorial Synagogue includes Russia's first permanent exhibit acknowledging the Nazi Holocaust. In joining a Russian Orthodox church and mosque at the war memorial park, the new synagogue becomes a clear symbol that Russia's Jews are a religious and political force to be reckoned with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1998 | ERIC RIMBERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Soloveichik is the kind of kid who makes adults believe they are looking at the next Einstein. Despite coming to the United States from Eastern Europe only seven years ago, the 18-year-old senior at Milken Community High School of Stephen Wise Temple, received 1,600--the highest score possible--on his college entrance exams. College, no doubt, will mean Harvard, MIT, Stanford, or one of the other elite schools.
NEWS
October 1, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the most banal yet terrifying of documents, restricting people to living where police chose. It listed workplace and family status. At its "Fifth Point," it even told the all-powerful authorities whether an individual was, say, Russian, Ukrainian or Jewish. More than anything else, this "nationalities" clause made the internal passport--the bludgeon of czarist and Soviet totalitarian regimes--unpopular with this country's Jewish minority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1997 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Walking up one aisle and down the next, the middle-aged woman knew this was no ordinary trip to the market. She was making preparations for cooking her first Passover Seder, one that would be celebrated in her new home after years of repression in the former Soviet Union. Alla Ghydar, 53, was determined that everything should be kosher, as is the custom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1995 | BETH KNOBEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Moscow's lone matzo bakery closed last autumn, it looked as if Russian Jews might lack the sacred flat bread necessary for Passover, the Jewish holiday of freedom. But thanks to the efforts of a Los Angeles-based Jewish organization and a host of local merchants, Russian Jews will have everything they need--from matzo balls to gefilte fish--for the holiday, which begins at sundown today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1996 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian voters are stepping inside polling booths today to choose between Democratic reforms and a dark Communist past. You might expect such a historic event to captivate fellow Russians in Los Angeles. After all, when other countries hold critical elections, local emigres--whether Mexicans, Koreans or Salvadorans--anxiously await the results. Yet many Russians in West Hollywood and other enclaves are approaching the hotly contested election with cool indifference.
NEWS
March 28, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the spring of 1990, with the U.S.S.R. disintegrating, thousands of Soviet Jews made an irony-laden decision: Frightened at the thought of the latent anti-Semitic forces that the Soviet breakup might unleash, they boarded trains and went, of all places, to Germany. History-conscious American Jews might not see Germany as an obvious haven in troubled times. But the Soviet faithful perceived this country as a bastion of stability--and a new home with better work prospects than Israel.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When American forces liberated Mikhailo Soikys in Germany in 1945, he could have emigrated to the United States. But Soikys, who survived Auschwitz by pretending to be a Georgian Turk and then escaped from a train bound for Buchenwald, decided to return to what was then the Soviet Union. "I thought things had changed," the 75-year-old Ukrainian Jew explained while visiting a center for Holocaust survivors in Kiev. "But it was worse. Had I known, I would have chosen differently."
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