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NEWS
December 14, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost 500 years after its expulsion of the Jews, Spain is trying to reach out to their descendants all over the world, but the task is troubling, disquieting, fraught with hidden complexity. Few problems, however, are visible amid all the ceremony. King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain expelled the Jews in 1492--the same year that the royal couple completed the conquest of Spain from the Arabs and the same year that Columbus, in their pay, discovered America.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1999
I read with interest "Renewing Jewish Heritage" (Sept. 20). We have just returned from a trip to Portugal and Spain with a study group on Jewish heritage and were fortunate to have been invited to a Sabbath service in Belmonte, Portugal, of Jews who now practice their Judaism openly after surviving nearly 500 years as secret Jews. We also visited Girona, Spain, where the local government is discovering archives about the Jewish population before what they refer to as "the expulsion."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1987 | ALFREDO GOMEZ, Associated Press
When Queen Isabella sent Christopher Columbus off to sea in 1492, she also expelled Jews from Spain. Now, as the 500th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of America nears, Spain is offering Sephardic Jews around the world a special place in the celebrations. Sepharad is the Hebrew name for Spain. Sephardim are descendants of the people expelled by Queen Isabella, or those who follow Sephardic rites.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The Albalat family secret began to unravel in the spring of 1982 as 10-year-old Magnolia blossomed from schoolgirl to maturity. Other girls her age in the predominately Latino and Catholic neighborhood of Huntington Park were studying catechism and picking pretty white dresses for their first Communion. Young Maggie was not allowed to attend Sunday school and had never even been baptized. She wondered why, but no one said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain are famed as the monarchs who financed Christopher Columbus' 1492 venture into the unknown. But they are also remembered as unforgiving persecutors who sought to expel all unconverted Jews from Spain the year Columbus set sail. The tragedy is detailed in two dozen chronicles that describe-- sometimes firsthand--the deprivation inflicted on tens of thousands of Jews before and after the March 31, 1492, edict. Dr.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prideful Spain welcomes Arabs and Jews here this morning with the same enthusiasm as when it expelled them both 499 years ago. Whatever history the Middle East antagonists make at a T-shaped table in an old palace here, the fact of their encounter in Madrid is one of history's jokes. Jews and Muslims, enemies of different stripes but equally hated, were booted from Roman Catholic Spain in the same year: 1492. They left amid war and religious hatred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1991 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a Westside synagogue last week, scholars and Sephardic Jews remembered the other landmark event of 1492. As everyone knows, Columbus reached the New World in 1492. But that same year, Spain's monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, also ordered the nation's Jews either to convert to Christianity or to leave the country under pain of death. At least 50,000 Jews--some believe as many as 300,000--were banished from Spain.
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Spaniards, Madrid's selection as the site of the Mideast peace conference is a romantic chance to redress the troubled history of 500 years ago and reassert Spain as a crossroads of the Muslim and Jewish worlds. Spaniards, in fact, believe that this history and their special geography make Spain a natural host for the conference scheduled to start Oct. 30.
NEWS
December 29, 1988
Spanish dictator Francisco Franco allowed the secret exodus of 100,000 Jews from Morocco into Spain from 1957 to 1963, former Israeli intelligence chief Isser Harel said. In World War II, the Franco government had close ties to the anti-Semitic regimes of Nazi Germany and fascist Italy. Harel said that Franco "wanted to improve his image after his close cooperation with Hitler and Mussolini." And, Harel added, "There was still the historic memory of the Jewish ouster from Spain (in 1492)."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1998 | Religion News Service
For the first time in more than five centuries, the Jewish community of Spain has held a public celebration of Hanukkah. Members of the small community lighted candles Sunday at the same location in Girona, Spain, where their ancestors sought protection in 1391 from anti-Semitic violence that was prevalent at the time. Jews were expelled from Spain in 1492. "This is an emotional and unforgettable day," Mayor Joaquim Nadal told the gathering outside the ruins of Gironella Tower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1998 | Religion News Service
For the first time in more than five centuries, the Jewish community of Spain has held a public celebration of Hanukkah. Members of the small community lighted candles Sunday at the same location in Girona, Spain, where their ancestors sought protection in 1391 from anti-Semitic violence that was prevalent at the time. Jews were expelled from Spain in 1492. "This is an emotional and unforgettable day," Mayor Joaquim Nadal told the gathering outside the ruins of Gironella Tower.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1992 | DONNA ROSENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Racist graffiti is scrawled on this city's only synagogue, groups of young soccer fans wave swastika banners in the stadium, some toy shops sell Adolf Hitler dolls, and a common expression seems to be, " Hacer una judiada, " which means to do something Jewish--bad or greedy.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | HUGH A. MULLIGAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Five hundred years after the Jews were deported from Spain on the same tide that carried Columbus to the New World, America's oldest synagogue has survived to hear a king and president welcome them back to the Iberian Peninsula. The president, Mario Soares of Portugal, came in person.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This year, amid commemorations and critiques of the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' voyage from Spain into the unknown, scholars are examining another quincentennial with a critical eye. The expulsion of all unconverted Jews from Spain in 1492 during the notorious Spanish Inquisition was long thought to have involved as many as 300,000 Jews. Historians have said the expulsion had a disastrous effect on Spain's economy, forcing out most of its financial wizards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain are famed as the monarchs who financed Christopher Columbus' 1492 venture into the unknown. But they are also remembered as unforgiving persecutors who sought to expel all unconverted Jews from Spain the year Columbus set sail. The tragedy is detailed in two dozen chronicles that describe-- sometimes firsthand--the deprivation inflicted on tens of thousands of Jews before and after the March 31, 1492, edict. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1991 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a Westside synagogue last week, scholars and Sephardic Jews remembered the other landmark event of 1492. As everyone knows, Columbus reached the New World in 1492. But that same year, Spain's monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella, also ordered the nation's Jews either to convert to Christianity or to leave the country under pain of death. At least 50,000 Jews--some believe as many as 300,000--were banished from Spain.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1992 | DONNA ROSENTHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Racist graffiti is scrawled on this city's only synagogue, groups of young soccer fans wave swastika banners in the stadium, some toy shops sell Adolf Hitler dolls, and a common expression seems to be, " Hacer una judiada, " which means to do something Jewish--bad or greedy.
NEWS
September 20, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The Albalat family secret began to unravel in the spring of 1982 as 10-year-old Magnolia blossomed from schoolgirl to maturity. Other girls her age in the predominately Latino and Catholic neighborhood of Huntington Park were studying catechism and picking pretty white dresses for their first Communion. Young Maggie was not allowed to attend Sunday school and had never even been baptized. She wondered why, but no one said.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prideful Spain welcomes Arabs and Jews here this morning with the same enthusiasm as when it expelled them both 499 years ago. Whatever history the Middle East antagonists make at a T-shaped table in an old palace here, the fact of their encounter in Madrid is one of history's jokes. Jews and Muslims, enemies of different stripes but equally hated, were booted from Roman Catholic Spain in the same year: 1492. They left amid war and religious hatred.
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Spaniards, Madrid's selection as the site of the Mideast peace conference is a romantic chance to redress the troubled history of 500 years ago and reassert Spain as a crossroads of the Muslim and Jewish worlds. Spaniards, in fact, believe that this history and their special geography make Spain a natural host for the conference scheduled to start Oct. 30.
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