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NEWS
January 13, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the dark clouds of World War II gathered over Europe, Jews by the tens of thousands desperately hoped to find sanctuary in neutral Switzerland. Many were turned away at the frontier, or even handed to the Nazis by the Swiss. But in other cases, even those permitted to cross the Alps to safety were not at the end of their ordeals.
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NEWS
June 15, 1998 | Reuters
The Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center defended its latest Holocaust report Sunday after a backlash by the Swiss government and even by the famed Nazi-hunter for whom the center is named. "We are not backing down. This is not a report about the Swiss people of 1942 or the Swiss government or people of today," Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of the Wiesenthal Center, said Sunday. Hier said historian Alan Morris Schom's report was a survey of extremist groups.
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NEWS
January 14, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Switzerland on Tuesday said a U.S. historian's report accusing it of having discriminated against wartime Jewish refugees by locking them up in labor camps and subjecting them to a special tax was insulting, simplistic and laced with errors. "Any former refugees who were in Swiss camps today express gratitude toward Switzerland for the fact that they survived the war because they were accepted in Switzerland," said Linda Shepard, an official spokeswoman in Bern, the Swiss capital.
NEWS
June 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
A Jewish newspaper in Switzerland has disputed a new report that alleges some Swiss leaders were pro-Nazi during World War II, charging that the study distorted the strength of a movement supporting the Third Reich. The newspaper, the Israelitisches Wochenblatt, alleged that the study issued in New York by the Simon Wiesenthal Center "deliberately suppressed the strong anti-Nazi movement in Switzerland."
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | From Reuters
Authors of a controversial report accusing the Swiss government of aiding Nazi Germany during World War II defended themselves Wednesday against accusations that the conclusions were unproved. The report, based largely on documents from German and Swiss archives, was criticized by Swiss President Flavio Cotti as "untenable and perfidious" and an insult to "an entire generation."
NEWS
June 15, 1998 | Reuters
The Los Angeles-based Simon Wiesenthal Center defended its latest Holocaust report Sunday after a backlash by the Swiss government and even by the famed Nazi-hunter for whom the center is named. "We are not backing down. This is not a report about the Swiss people of 1942 or the Swiss government or people of today," Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of the Wiesenthal Center, said Sunday. Hier said historian Alan Morris Schom's report was a survey of extremist groups.
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Switzerland's justice minister met clandestinely during World War II with leaders of a Swiss anti-Semitic group, promising to stop most Jews fleeing the Holocaust from entering the country but warning that the policy had to be kept secret, according to documents contained in a report to be released today.
NEWS
June 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
A Jewish newspaper in Switzerland has disputed a new report that alleges some Swiss leaders were pro-Nazi during World War II, charging that the study distorted the strength of a movement supporting the Third Reich. The newspaper, the Israelitisches Wochenblatt, alleged that the study issued in New York by the Simon Wiesenthal Center "deliberately suppressed the strong anti-Nazi movement in Switzerland."
NEWS
September 13, 1995 | WILLIAM DROZDIAK, THE WASHINGTON POST
Leading Swiss banks announced Tuesday that they have discovered $34 million in dormant accounts that may belong to Holocaust victims and said they will help Jewish survivors and their heirs track down lost assets. Lifting the veil of secrecy on one of the most controversial legacies of the war, the Swiss Bankers' Assn.
NEWS
June 3, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nazi Germany's war machine might have broken down months or even years sooner if Adolf Hitler's government had not been able to use stolen gold to purchase crucial raw materials from neutral nations such as Turkey, Portugal and Sweden, the U.S. government reported Tuesday.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | From Reuters
Authors of a controversial report accusing the Swiss government of aiding Nazi Germany during World War II defended themselves Wednesday against accusations that the conclusions were unproved. The report, based largely on documents from German and Swiss archives, was criticized by Swiss President Flavio Cotti as "untenable and perfidious" and an insult to "an entire generation."
NEWS
June 10, 1998 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Switzerland's justice minister met clandestinely during World War II with leaders of a Swiss anti-Semitic group, promising to stop most Jews fleeing the Holocaust from entering the country but warning that the policy had to be kept secret, according to documents contained in a report to be released today.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Switzerland on Tuesday said a U.S. historian's report accusing it of having discriminated against wartime Jewish refugees by locking them up in labor camps and subjecting them to a special tax was insulting, simplistic and laced with errors. "Any former refugees who were in Swiss camps today express gratitude toward Switzerland for the fact that they survived the war because they were accepted in Switzerland," said Linda Shepard, an official spokeswoman in Bern, the Swiss capital.
NEWS
January 13, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the dark clouds of World War II gathered over Europe, Jews by the tens of thousands desperately hoped to find sanctuary in neutral Switzerland. Many were turned away at the frontier, or even handed to the Nazis by the Swiss. But in other cases, even those permitted to cross the Alps to safety were not at the end of their ordeals.
OPINION
July 17, 1994 | Beate Ruhm von Oppen, Beate Ruhm von Oppen teaches at St. John's College. Her publications include "Helmuth James von Moltke: Letters to Freya 1939-1945" (Knopf)
When the first news fragments about the failed attempt to kill Adolf Hitler came over the ticker tape in the afternoon of July 20, 1944, it was almost unbearably exciting. I was working in the Political Intelligence Department of the British Foreign Office. We had a machine that gave us intercepts of the German news agency. I listened to Hitler's midnight broadcast. There was, alas, no doubt about it--it was his voice.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Georges-Andre Chevallaz, then a young lieutenant carrying a rifle, remembers when the Swiss army pulled back into the snowy Alps, expecting at any moment a blitzkrieg by the Nazis and their allies. "After the defeat of France, Switzerland was completely encircled. It decided to defend itself in its mountain redoubt, but it also had to survive," said Chevallaz, now 82, who went on to become president of his country.
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