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NEWS
November 2, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jews of Istanbul, who have lived for centuries along the shores of the Golden Horn, never tire of one particular sea story: In 1492, Christopher Columbus set sail from the tiny port of Palos . . . because the harbors at Cadiz and Seville were jammed with boatloads of Sephardic Jews expelled from Spain by his royal sponsors. Columbus went west to uncertainty. Around 60,000 Jews exiled that year by Ferdinand and Isabella came east to official welcome in lands of the Ottoman Empire.
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NEWS
May 30, 1993 | Reuters
Spanish King Juan Carlos ended a three-day state visit to Turkey Friday after holding a historic meeting with leaders of a Jewish community whose ancestors were expelled from Spain 500 years ago. The meeting was the first between a Spanish monarch and Turkey's Sephardic Jews since Fernando and Isabel, the Catholic king and queen of Spain, expelled the Jews in 1492.
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NEWS
May 30, 1993 | Reuters
Spanish King Juan Carlos ended a three-day state visit to Turkey Friday after holding a historic meeting with leaders of a Jewish community whose ancestors were expelled from Spain 500 years ago. The meeting was the first between a Spanish monarch and Turkey's Sephardic Jews since Fernando and Isabel, the Catholic king and queen of Spain, expelled the Jews in 1492.
NEWS
November 2, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jews of Istanbul, who have lived for centuries along the shores of the Golden Horn, never tire of one particular sea story: In 1492, Christopher Columbus set sail from the tiny port of Palos . . . because the harbors at Cadiz and Seville were jammed with boatloads of Sephardic Jews expelled from Spain by his royal sponsors. Columbus went west to uncertainty. Around 60,000 Jews exiled that year by Ferdinand and Isabella came east to official welcome in lands of the Ottoman Empire.
NEWS
September 7, 1986
In a predominantly Muslim country of 45 million people, the Jewish community in Turkey is small and shrinking fast despite hundreds of years of history. Jewish leaders in Turkey estimate that there are between 22,000 and 25,000 Jews in the country, with about 18,000 of those in Istanbul, the largest city. They cannot be sure, since the Turkish government's census does not list the population by religion.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | Associated Press
An Israeli diplomat was killed and three other people were wounded Saturday by a car bomb blast, police said. Israel confirmed the death and denounced the attack. The previously unknown Islamic Revenge Organization claimed responsibility for the attack in telephone calls to newspapers immediately afterward, the Anatolia news agency reported. "We have responded to the Israelis," the anonymous caller was quoted as saying. It was the second attack against Jews in Turkey in a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
An attack by Arab gunmen on a synagogue here last September fleetingly focused world attention on the anomaly of a small Jewish community in one of the world's largest Muslim countries. Many outside Turkey were hardly aware of the existence of the 22,000-strong Jewish community here, let alone its rich history and traditions. The Jews of Istanbul are descendants of the Jews who fled Spain and Portugal in 1492, during the Inquisition.
NEWS
July 17, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
Demonstrators shouting anti-Semitic slogans attacked an Israeli airline office Thursday as Israel's president was visiting a historic synagogue, police said. There were no injuries, and two demonstrators were arrested, police said. Nearly 100 demonstrators shouting "Down with Israel!" and "Jew go home!" hurled rocks and shattered the windows of the El Al airline office in mid-town Istanbul, state radio said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1986
The attack on a synagogue in Istanbul was both shocking and tragic. When one recalls that many of Istanbul's Jews are the descendants of Sephardic Jews who fled the Spanish Inquisition 500 years ago, this latest episode more acutely reminds us of the need to resist terrorism. I recall that on my first visit to Istanbul in 1981, the release of the American hostages from Iran was still fresh in everyone's minds. The Turkish government, fearing further terrorist actions against Americans, provided protection in the form of an armed escort for Americans attending Anglican services at the chapel located on the grounds of the British Consulate.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | AHMET BALAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In 1492, the year Columbus sailed westward from Spain, that nation's Catholic rulers expelled its Jews. Many came east, to Turkey, where their descendants have lived in relative peace. As several countries plan observances of the historic voyage 500 years ago, Turkey's Jews prepare to celebrate their own special anniversary and honor Bayezit II, the Muslim sultan who welcomed the Spanish outcasts. About 26,000 Jews now live in Turkey, a predominantly Muslim nation of 57 million.
NEWS
September 7, 1986
In a predominantly Muslim country of 45 million people, the Jewish community in Turkey is small and shrinking fast despite hundreds of years of history. Jewish leaders in Turkey estimate that there are between 22,000 and 25,000 Jews in the country, with about 18,000 of those in Istanbul, the largest city. They cannot be sure, since the Turkish government's census does not list the population by religion.
NEWS
September 11, 1986 | Associated Press
In the temple still stained with the blood of the dead, more than 1,000 mourners said final prayers Wednesday for the 21 victims of a terrorist massacre at Istanbul's largest synagogue. Women, their heads covered by black shawls, wailed as rabbis read Jewish prayers, including one asking revenge for the death of innocent people and another normally said during war.
OPINION
May 1, 2007 | Daniel Sokatch and David N. Myers, DANIEL SOKATCH is executive director of the Progressive Jewish Alliance. DAVID N. MYERS teaches Jewish history at UCLA.
THIS YEAR, Congress established April 15 as Holocaust Memorial Day, commemorating the Nazi genocide of European Jewry. Just nine days later, on April 24, Armenians throughout the world observed the commemoration of their great tragedy: the massacre of as many as 1.5 million Armenians at the hands of the Turks that began in 1915. In many ways, it was the 20th century's first genocide that helped set the stage for its largest, including Rwanda and now Darfur.
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