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NEWS
October 1, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 32 pupils in Mrs. Sidneva's third-grade class listened with rapt attention Monday as she described how Nazi soldiers shot more than 30,000 people in two days 50 years ago in a wooded area on the edge of Kiev. "The Nazis hated all of us--the Ukrainians, the Russians and the Byelorussians--but who did they hate the most?" Inna M. Sidneva asked the 8- and 9-year-olds sitting erect at their desks. Several hands shot up, and the teacher motioned to a boy sitting in the front row.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2000 | Associated Press
KGB files on a Ukrainian rabbi have been turned over to Lubavitchers, a Hasidic Jewish group headquartered in Brooklyn. The files concern Levi Schneerson, who was chief rabbi of Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine, until his arrest in 1939 for counterrevolutionary activities--namely promoting Judaism in the Soviet Union. Schneerson was imprisoned, then exiled to a remote area of Kazakhstan. He was released in 1944 and died a few months later.
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NEWS
August 2, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maria Palte was 12 when the Nazis, having overrun Kiev, came for her and her family. A neighbor, Olga Roshinenko, then 17, hid the younger girl in her home. Palte's mother, brother and sisters perished in the narrow ravine called Babi Yar. She, and the woman who saved her, survived.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1998 | Reuters
A Jewish immigrant who said she received repeated death threats in her native Ukraine won a reprieve from deportation Friday when a federal appeals court panel approved her request for asylum. Vera Korablina, now 57 and a resident of Los Angeles, arrived in the United States on a tourist visa in 1995 and applied for asylum on the grounds that she would be persecuted if she returned to Kiev, according to her lawyer, Joseph Rose. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1995 | ED BOND
In Hebrew, the name of the Shomrei Torah Synagogue in West Hills means Guardians of the Torah, which seems fitting to documentary filmmaker David Notowitz. "It's the most appropriate name you could have," Notowitz said after accepting a Torah--a large, parchment scroll bearing the handwritten words of the five books of Moses--from Shomrei Torah Rabbi Elijah Schochet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1995 | ED BOND
Not until after the donation of a Torah was arranged did the Shomrei Torah Synagogue in West Hills learn just how close its connection to the Ukrainian village of Vinogradov was. "There were some members of our congregation who were from Vinogradov," said Rabbi Eli Schochet, whose temple donated a Torah to the Ukrainian village after a filmmaker launched a nationwide search for one.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1995 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alex Khoroshan stood inside Temple Beth Hillel on Sunday with a smile as wide as his native Ukraine, a man who could finally say to his wife--who was on this day also his bride--that they were two Jews from the former Soviet Union who were finally, truly free at last.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1998 | Reuters
A Jewish immigrant who said she received repeated death threats in her native Ukraine won a reprieve from deportation Friday when a federal appeals court panel approved her request for asylum. Vera Korablina, now 57 and a resident of Los Angeles, arrived in the United States on a tourist visa in 1995 and applied for asylum on the grounds that she would be persecuted if she returned to Kiev, according to her lawyer, Joseph Rose. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2000 | Associated Press
KGB files on a Ukrainian rabbi have been turned over to Lubavitchers, a Hasidic Jewish group headquartered in Brooklyn. The files concern Levi Schneerson, who was chief rabbi of Dnepropetrovsk, Ukraine, until his arrest in 1939 for counterrevolutionary activities--namely promoting Judaism in the Soviet Union. Schneerson was imprisoned, then exiled to a remote area of Kazakhstan. He was released in 1944 and died a few months later.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first it was only for three months, so the Brooklyn rabbi said,why not? We are needed. Let's go help Ukrainian Jews who have never set foot in a synagogue or lighted Shabbas candles. So Rabbi Yaakov Bleich said goodby to New York, gathered his wife, Bashy, and headed off to the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, where Jewish life once flourished, to renew his people's ancient covenant with God. It was 1990, and perestroika was in full swing.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When American forces liberated Mikhailo Soikys in Germany in 1945, he could have emigrated to the United States. But Soikys, who survived Auschwitz by pretending to be a Georgian Turk and then escaped from a train bound for Buchenwald, decided to return to what was then the Soviet Union. "I thought things had changed," the 75-year-old Ukrainian Jew explained while visiting a center for Holocaust survivors in Kiev. "But it was worse. Had I known, I would have chosen differently."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1995 | ED BOND
Not until after the donation of a Torah was arranged did the Shomrei Torah Synagogue in West Hills learn just how close its connection to the Ukrainian village of Vinogradov was. "There were some members of our congregation who were from Vinogradov," said Rabbi Eli Schochet, whose temple donated a Torah to the Ukrainian village after a filmmaker launched a nationwide search for one.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1995 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alex Khoroshan stood inside Temple Beth Hillel on Sunday with a smile as wide as his native Ukraine, a man who could finally say to his wife--who was on this day also his bride--that they were two Jews from the former Soviet Union who were finally, truly free at last.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1995 | ED BOND
In Hebrew, the name of the Shomrei Torah Synagogue in West Hills means Guardians of the Torah, which seems fitting to documentary filmmaker David Notowitz. "It's the most appropriate name you could have," Notowitz said after accepting a Torah--a large, parchment scroll bearing the handwritten words of the five books of Moses--from Shomrei Torah Rabbi Elijah Schochet.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first it was only for three months, so the Brooklyn rabbi said,why not? We are needed. Let's go help Ukrainian Jews who have never set foot in a synagogue or lighted Shabbas candles. So Rabbi Yaakov Bleich said goodby to New York, gathered his wife, Bashy, and headed off to the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, where Jewish life once flourished, to renew his people's ancient covenant with God. It was 1990, and perestroika was in full swing.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty years after the Nazis slaughtered tens of thousands of people, mostly Jews, in a ravine outside Kiev, a Ukrainian leader stood at Babi Yar and vowed that such an atrocity must never happen again. "Anti-Semitism still finds in some places its speakers, but they will have to know they will get no support on Ukrainian lands," Leonid Kravchuk, the president of the Ukrainian Parliament, told a crowd of about 10,000 who gathered on a chilly autumn evening to honor those killed.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | MARY MYCIO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When American forces liberated Mikhailo Soikys in Germany in 1945, he could have emigrated to the United States. But Soikys, who survived Auschwitz by pretending to be a Georgian Turk and then escaped from a train bound for Buchenwald, decided to return to what was then the Soviet Union. "I thought things had changed," the 75-year-old Ukrainian Jew explained while visiting a center for Holocaust survivors in Kiev. "But it was worse. Had I known, I would have chosen differently."
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 32 pupils in Mrs. Sidneva's third-grade class listened with rapt attention Monday as she described how Nazi soldiers shot more than 30,000 people in two days 50 years ago in a wooded area on the edge of Kiev. "The Nazis hated all of us--the Ukrainians, the Russians and the Byelorussians--but who did they hate the most?" Inna M. Sidneva asked the 8- and 9-year-olds sitting erect at their desks. Several hands shot up, and the teacher motioned to a boy sitting in the front row.
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