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NEWS
April 17, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration obtained advance support of American Jewish leaders before imposing new rules that had the effect of diverting most Soviet Jewish emigres from the United States to Israel, according to informed sources. Administration officials and Jewish leaders both said that the consultations defused what could have turned into a firestorm of controversy.
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NEWS
March 18, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush rejected a proposed compromise on loan guarantees for Israel on Tuesday because it did not include a requirement that Israel halt all settlement activity in the disputed West Bank and Gaza Strip. The move appears to doom Jerusalem's chances of obtaining the $10 billion in loan guarantees that it needs to provide houses and jobs for Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union. "We haven't got an agreement," Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.
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NEWS
February 19, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
For a decade, this down-at-the-heels resort town northwest of Rome has served as a friendly staging point for emigre Soviet Jews headed to the United States. Now, with refugees arriving in unprecedented numbers, disillusionment washes Ladispoli's dour streets and polluted beaches. It is glasnost backlash.
NEWS
January 22, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III will meet Israeli Ambassador Zalman Shoval on Thursday to try to settle an emotional dispute over Israel's request for $10 billion in loan guarantees to house and resettle Jews from the former Soviet Union. Although the battle over U.S.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Last month, on the eve of a U.S.-Soviet summit conference with human rights on the agenda, 1,145 Jewish emigres left the Soviet Union with visas for Israel. A total of 86 actually arrived here. The rest became what the Israeli government calls "dropouts," exchanging their immigrant invitations to Israel for refugee status in some other country once they had crossed the Soviet border. Most went to the United States.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under pressure from top Soviet government and Communist Party officials, Moscow city authorities agreed Wednesday to permit a weeklong international Jewish film festival despite their earlier fears that the festival might bring anti-Semitic demonstrations. Reversing their previous decision, the city authorities said that "the political situation in the city . . . was less complicated" and that security could be provided for those attending the festival, scheduled to begin Saturday.
NEWS
July 27, 1988
A five-man team of Israeli diplomats left for Moscow on a trip described by a Foreign Ministry official as a "major event." Yeshayahu Anug, deputy director of the Foreign Ministry, said the delegation's immediate purpose is to help process Israeli visas, both for Soviet Jews wishing to emigrate and those seeking to visit. The delegates traveled first to The Hague, where they are to pick up two-month Soviet visas before leaving Thursday for Moscow.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Housing Minister Ariel Sharon introduced his controversial housing plan for Soviet immigrants at a Cabinet meeting Sunday, but action was delayed because of opposition from Finance Minister Yitzhak Modai. Sharon proposed buying 50,000 mobile homes and 40,000 prefabricated houses in the next two years, calling on the government to build another 60,000 units each year over the next four years. Sharon's plan is mainly designed to accommodate Jewish immigrants from the Soviet Union.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House gave overwhelming, bipartisan approval Tuesday to $720 million in economic aid for Nicaragua and Panama, meeting President Bush's request for speedy action. But Senate Democratic leaders continued on a partisan course likely to result in funding delays.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Termed the first such direct shipment from this country to the Soviet Union, 2 tons of kosher food and other Passover supplies were sent by Manhattan's Park East Synagogue in Moscow. Rabbi Arthur Schneier, leader of the Manhattan synagogue and president of the Appeal of Conscience Foundation, worked out plans for the shipment with Soviet officials in January.
NEWS
December 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
To applause and the jubilant sound of a ram's horn, a ship brought 477 Jews from the former Soviet Union to Israel in the first such trip by sea since the wave of immigration began two years ago. Four tugboats pulled the golden-hulled Greek vessel Mediterranean Sky into Haifa Bay as immigrants on the deck sought out relatives and loved ones gathered on shore.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | From Reuters
The number of Soviet Jews who emigrated to Israel in 1991 was less than half the predicted total of 400,000, immigration officials said Thursday. The approximately 140,000 Soviet Jews who arrived in 1991 represented a drop of 23% from the 1990 figure, Absorption Minister Yitzhak Peretz said. He noted that 20,000 immigrants were airlifted from Ethiopia in 1991, more than 14,000 of them in one 36-hour period during the civil war in that African nation.
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A bomb exploded in Hungary as a busload of 28 Soviet Jews passed by on their way to the Budapest airport for a plane to Israel. Authorities said two police escorts were injured and that Arabs were believed responsible for the blast. Reports conflicted on whether any emigres were injured in the attack, the first major incident targeting Jewish emigres in Eastern Europe since they were allowed to pass through former East Bloc nations two years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1991 | AMY LOUISE KAZMIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Ukraine, where he lived until last March, Igor Belogolov was like many other Soviet Jews. He knew nothing of the traditions or religious significance of Hanukkah, the Jewish festival of lights. "We know nothing about the history," said Belogolov, 34. "In the Soviet Union, it is difficult to find any kind of information about Jewish people."
NEWS
November 6, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III scolded Israel on Tuesday for opening a new Jewish settlement on occupied Arab territory in the midst of peace negotiations, saying that the action seemed "provocative" and did not help "create a positive environment" for the talks.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | CHARLES WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a recent concert in this industrial city in the Soviet Far East, the audience clapped and stomped their feet as a portly American danced on stage and sang a rendition of the soul music hit "I Feel Good" in Yiddish. Holding a "Festival of Jewish Culture" just 40 miles from the Chinese frontier may at first seem unusual, but not to the leadership of Birobidzhan, the capital of the Soviet Union's remote Jewish Autonomous Region.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | DAVID VOREACOS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union is violating international law by denying emigration to thousands of citizens on the grounds that they possess "state secrets," a Jewish organization said Tuesday in a report prepared for Secretary of State George P. Shultz. "The Soviet Union is alone among major developed states in routinely concluding that ordinary citizens possess 'state secrets' so as to justify preventing their leaving the country," said the report, released by the National Conference on Soviet Jewry.
NEWS
September 4, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
New limits on the admission of Soviet refugees to the United States won't reduce the number of Soviet Jews coming to the United States but will maintain their admissions at roughly 33,000 per year, Bush Administration officials said Sunday. The Administration, swamped by applications from Soviet Jews, has tentatively decided to put a ceiling on Soviet refugee admissions to hold them at current levels, the officials said.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir expressed bitter regret Monday at Washington's delay in granting new U.S. loan guarantees to help integrate Soviet immigrants and at the same time expressed satisfaction over the spread of new settlements on occupied land--the very issue that has put him at odds with President Bush and brought on the aid showdown.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the oddest protests ever seen in this city ended Friday when a group of bearded, soberly dressed Hasidic rabbis suddenly stopped picketing the Lenin Library, an action they had kept up 24 hours a day for nearly a month. The reason: They finally sensed victory.
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