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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1993 | JOHN DART
Rabbinate: Five clergy in the Valley say their careers have been largely free of the sexual discrimination reported in a nationwide survey. Five women rabbis who serve synagogues in the San Fernando Valley area say they are very satisfied with their work, enjoy the respect of their congregations and have encountered little or none of the sexual harassment reported by some female Jewish clergy in a recent national survey.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were often the first to be killed. Some traded sex for survival. And many were the backbone of the Jewish underground resistance movement. They were the women of the Holocaust. And educators say it's time for their stories to be told. "We always talk about heroes as men, and I tell [my students] we need to have female heroines," said Bassett Elementary School teacher Sharon Baharouzi, whose Jewish cousin, a woman, was killed in an Auschwitz uprising.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1994 | LARRY STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
In a move that is being hailed as a first, a large Westside synagogue has chosen a woman to be its senior rabbi. Rabbi Laura Geller, who has spoken out against racism, joined in a women's interfaith coalition to help rape victims in Bosnia and campaigned for abortion rights, will be the first woman to head Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills. Her appointment, which begins Aug. 1, would make Temple Emanuel the largest urban congregation in the country to be served by a woman, said Rabbi Lennard R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2000 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Claire Stein isn't a rebel, but this Passover the 73-year-old Laguna Niguel woman will alter her Seder table rules. She will lay out a cup of water honoring Moses' oldest sister, Miriam, on Wednesday night. "We've never done this before, but we're going to do it this year," Stein said. "One cup for Elijah, but also one for Miriam." Stein added that if her "very Orthodox" grandfather were alive, he would as soon skip the tradition as stand for that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were often the first to be killed. Some traded sex for survival. And many were the backbone of the Jewish underground resistance movement. They were the women of the Holocaust. And educators say it's time for their stories to be told. "We always talk about heroes as men, and I tell [my students] we need to have female heroines," said Bassett Elementary School teacher Sharon Baharouzi, whose Jewish cousin, a woman, was killed in an Auschwitz uprising.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1993 | ANDREA HEIMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Every morning before dawn, Steve Baum dons his brown knit yarmulke and a clean mechanic's uniform, hops on his Yamaha motorcycle and rides to Young Israel of Northridge to lead the morning services. An Orthodox Jew and owner of Dr. Steve's Car Clinic, Baum is not only the choice mechanic for most religious Jews in the San Fernando Valley, he is also one of Los Angeles' few remaining Orthodox cantors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hilda Kalir grew up in Germany but managed to leave in 1939, not long after Kristallnacht, "the night of broken glass" that marked the beginning of Adolf Hitler's reign of terror against the Jews. To be sure, Kalir missed out on raising her family and growing old in her hometown of Hamborn on the Rhine River. But she and her husband were among the fortunate--because they survived. They fled first to Jerusalem, where Kalir gave birth to their only child.
NEWS
April 21, 1998 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anne Bayme had the best of all models of what it is to be a Jewish woman: her mother, Sylvia Brown. Not only did Brown keep a kosher home and her family observant of Jewish tradition, but she was part of holding together the 10 Jewish families of tiny Vidalia, Ga., going out into the vastly Christian world around them and bringing Judaism to life. In her own time, Bayme would do a version of this in her hometown of Macon, Ga., but in ways her mother never could have dreamed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An appeals court has disqualified a judge from a custody case after he called a woman who appeared before him a "Jewish-American princess." Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert D. Monarch apologized to Nanci Rosen Carter, and, noting that he too is Jewish, said he did not intend the remark to be derogatory. Monarch denied he had any bias or prejudice against Carter, and refused to step down from the case. But Carter argued that the judge was clearly biased against her and filed an appeal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1995 | HOLLY J. WAGNER
Many Jews are suffering a loss of close relationships and political clout because of a failure to foster their culture in the home, a political commentator told 400 women at a Jewish Federation Council luncheon last week. "We make family," speaker Ellen Cannon said, stressing the need to build a family commitment to Judaism into education and home life. "Amongst (fellow) Jews, we don't use the word 'neighbor.' We use the word mishpucha (which means family)."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2000 | Associated Press
Yeshiva University has launched a graduate program in Orthodox-oriented study of Talmud and Torah for women, said to be the first university-based program of its kind in the United States. The two-year program for up to 10 women will lead to a certificate, but students have the option of simultaneously earning master's degrees tuition-free at the university's graduate school of Jewish education.
NEWS
April 21, 1998 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anne Bayme had the best of all models of what it is to be a Jewish woman: her mother, Sylvia Brown. Not only did Brown keep a kosher home and her family observant of Jewish tradition, but she was part of holding together the 10 Jewish families of tiny Vidalia, Ga., going out into the vastly Christian world around them and bringing Judaism to life. In her own time, Bayme would do a version of this in her hometown of Macon, Ga., but in ways her mother never could have dreamed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
Actress, singer and movie director Barbra Streisand will lend her name to a newly founded center for the study of Jewish women. Streisand is honorary chairwoman of the International Research Institute on Jewish Women, which is to be underwritten by the organization Hadassah and located at Brandeis University in Massachusetts. "I have always been bothered by negative stereotypes about us, and in my films I have always tried to show Jewish women in a positive light," said Streisand, who is Jewish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hilda Kalir grew up in Germany but managed to leave in 1939, not long after Kristallnacht, "the night of broken glass" that marked the beginning of Adolf Hitler's reign of terror against the Jews. To be sure, Kalir missed out on raising her family and growing old in her hometown of Hamborn on the Rhine River. But she and her husband were among the fortunate--because they survived. They fled first to Jerusalem, where Kalir gave birth to their only child.
NEWS
December 16, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hilda Kalir grew up in Germany and left in 1939, not long after Kristallnacht, "the night of broken glass" that marked the beginning of Adolf Hitler's reign of terror against the Jews. Like scores of Jewish women around her, Kalir, 83, missed out on raising a family and growing old with her husband in her hometown of Hamborn on the Rhine River. Within minutes of the start of World War II, she and her husband fled to Jerusalem, where she later gave birth to their only child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hilda Kalir grew up in Germany and left in 1939, not long after Kristallnacht, "the night of broken glass" that marked the beginning of Adolf Hitler's reign of terror against the Jews. Like scores of Jewish women around her, Kalir, 83, missed out on raising a family and growing old with her husband in her hometown of Hamborn on the Rhine River. Within minutes of the start of World War II, she and her husband fled to Jerusalem, where she later gave birth to their only child.
NEWS
January 29, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All they wanted was the right to pray with some of the same spiritual adornments as men--to hold the Torah, to wear a prayer shawl, to sing aloud the ancient praises of God--as they stood before the holiest shrine of Judaism. But when the 25 women gathered at Jerusalem's Western Wall in what would become a test case of women's role in religion and the role of religious authority in a modern democratic state, none expected the fury of the response.
NEWS
September 29, 1995 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A rare genetic defect linked to breast and ovarian cancer is eight times more common among Jewish women of European ancestry, researchers announced Thursday, promising the first inexpensive community screening test for the most common cancer among American women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1995 | HOLLY J. WAGNER
Many Jews are suffering a loss of close relationships and political clout because of a failure to foster their culture in the home, a political commentator told 400 women at a Jewish Federation Council luncheon last week. "We make family," speaker Ellen Cannon said, stressing the need to build a family commitment to Judaism into education and home life. "Amongst (fellow) Jews, we don't use the word 'neighbor.' We use the word mishpucha (which means family)."
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