Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJhumpa Lahiri
IN THE NEWS

Jhumpa Lahiri

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Porochista Khakpour
"A short story is like a toothache and you must drill it and fill it. A novel is more like bridgework," said the writer T.C. Boyle, author of 14 novels and more than 100 short stories. One might wonder what would be the outcome of drilling and filling a novel. There are two answers, it seems: one is "The Namesake," the other is "The Lowland," both incidentally by Jhumpa Lahiri. Lahiri, of course, happens to be one of the English language's most celebrated commanders, a storyteller revered for her perfect minimalist realism and crisp "plainness" - her words - that resists flash, trash, tricks, hooks, the works, and yet elevates, entrances and seduces all the same.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Porochista Khakpour
"A short story is like a toothache and you must drill it and fill it. A novel is more like bridgework," said the writer T.C. Boyle, author of 14 novels and more than 100 short stories. One might wonder what would be the outcome of drilling and filling a novel. There are two answers, it seems: one is "The Namesake," the other is "The Lowland," both incidentally by Jhumpa Lahiri. Lahiri, of course, happens to be one of the English language's most celebrated commanders, a storyteller revered for her perfect minimalist realism and crisp "plainness" - her words - that resists flash, trash, tricks, hooks, the works, and yet elevates, entrances and seduces all the same.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
In a smoke-stained San Francisco hotel room, Felix Starro is making fake blood. Starro is the third in a line of hucksterish Filipino faith healers. Hunched over a plastic jug in the bathroom, he brews corn syrup, water and red dye for a grim ritual known as the Holy Blessed Extraction of Negativites. As he stirs, he remembers how "long ago, Papa Felix made it the same way; because my hands were small my job was to squirt the liquid into the tiny bags and knot them up. We'd stay up all night, diligent and silent, as though our work was truly blessed and holy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Fall is a terrific time to be a reader. Publishers shake off their summer doldrums and get down to business again. And writers? Well, writers settle in also and put out big books. Over the next few months alone, we'll see new releases from an array of authors: Dave Eggers, Dana Goodyear, Elizabeth Gilbert and Donna Tartt among them. There are so many new titles that it's impossible to keep track of them. As to what we are to make of this, I choose to find it reassuring, a reminder that, despite the vagaries of the industry, the fundamentals haven't changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Fall is a terrific time to be a reader. Publishers shake off their summer doldrums and get down to business again. And writers? Well, writers settle in also and put out big books. Over the next few months alone, we'll see new releases from an array of authors: Dave Eggers, Dana Goodyear, Elizabeth Gilbert and Donna Tartt among them. There are so many new titles that it's impossible to keep track of them. As to what we are to make of this, I choose to find it reassuring, a reminder that, despite the vagaries of the industry, the fundamentals haven't changed.
NEWS
March 8, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
INDIAN-BORN director Mira Nair missed all the fanfare around the 2003 publication of "The Namesake," Jhumpa Lahiri's critically acclaimed second book examining the cultural struggles between first-generation Bengali immigrants and their American-born children. Nair, whose other credits include "Salaam Bombay" and "Monsoon Wedding," was filming "Vanity Fair" in England during the first part of the year.
NEWS
March 8, 2007 | Charles Taylor, Special to The Times
BECAUSE screen adaptations of novels are, by necessity, condensations of their source, one of the hardest challenges facing any screenwriter is adapting a book in which there's nothing extraneous in the prose. That description certainly applies to Jhumpa Lahiri's novel "The Namesake," the basis for Mira Nair's new movie.
BOOKS
March 30, 2008 | Lisa Fugard and Lisa Fugard is the author of the novel "Skinner's Drift."
WITH her Pulitzer Prize- winning story collection "Interpreter of Maladies" and her novel "The Namesake," Jhumpa Lahiri established herself as a clear-eyed and compassionate chronicler of the lives of expatriate Bengalis and their first-generation American-born children.
BOOKS
September 7, 2003 | Heller McAlpin, Heller McAlpin writes regularly for Book Review, among other publications.
What's in a name? That's the question Jhumpa Lahiri explores -- somewhat doggedly -- in her first novel, "The Namesake." Lahiri made a reputation for herself in 1999, at 32, when she published "Interpreter of Maladies," a luminous collection of stories about first-generation Americans attempting to bridge the disorienting, often baffling cultural gaps between their native India and their adopted country. The book ultimately won the PEN/Hemingway Award as well as the Pulitzer Prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2007 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
Indian-born, New York-based director Mira Nair has repeatedly enacted tales of culture clash in her films but never with quite as much warmth and thoughtfulness as she brings to "The Namesake." Coming off a botched literary adaptation -- the garbled, proto-feminist take on William Makepeace Thackeray's "Vanity Fair" -- she turns her attention to a novel that is not only more manageably scaled but also, for this expatriate filmmaker, surely closer to home.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
In a smoke-stained San Francisco hotel room, Felix Starro is making fake blood. Starro is the third in a line of hucksterish Filipino faith healers. Hunched over a plastic jug in the bathroom, he brews corn syrup, water and red dye for a grim ritual known as the Holy Blessed Extraction of Negativites. As he stirs, he remembers how "long ago, Papa Felix made it the same way; because my hands were small my job was to squirt the liquid into the tiny bags and knot them up. We'd stay up all night, diligent and silent, as though our work was truly blessed and holy.
BOOKS
March 30, 2008 | Lisa Fugard and Lisa Fugard is the author of the novel "Skinner's Drift."
WITH her Pulitzer Prize- winning story collection "Interpreter of Maladies" and her novel "The Namesake," Jhumpa Lahiri established herself as a clear-eyed and compassionate chronicler of the lives of expatriate Bengalis and their first-generation American-born children.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2007 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
Indian-born, New York-based director Mira Nair has repeatedly enacted tales of culture clash in her films but never with quite as much warmth and thoughtfulness as she brings to "The Namesake." Coming off a botched literary adaptation -- the garbled, proto-feminist take on William Makepeace Thackeray's "Vanity Fair" -- she turns her attention to a novel that is not only more manageably scaled but also, for this expatriate filmmaker, surely closer to home.
NEWS
March 8, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
INDIAN-BORN director Mira Nair missed all the fanfare around the 2003 publication of "The Namesake," Jhumpa Lahiri's critically acclaimed second book examining the cultural struggles between first-generation Bengali immigrants and their American-born children. Nair, whose other credits include "Salaam Bombay" and "Monsoon Wedding," was filming "Vanity Fair" in England during the first part of the year.
NEWS
March 8, 2007 | Charles Taylor, Special to The Times
BECAUSE screen adaptations of novels are, by necessity, condensations of their source, one of the hardest challenges facing any screenwriter is adapting a book in which there's nothing extraneous in the prose. That description certainly applies to Jhumpa Lahiri's novel "The Namesake," the basis for Mira Nair's new movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2003 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
Jhumpa Lahiri is tired. Overwhelmed, talked out, with a brain that is, as she apologetically puts it, "fried." Two weeks into promoting her first novel "The Namesake," the 35-year-old author is in that peculiar Twilight Zone known as the national book tour, a whirlwind of readings, interviews, airplanes and takeout food. Although she's brought her husband and their 16-month-old son on the road with her, she's not getting much time to see them.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2003 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
Jhumpa Lahiri is tired. Overwhelmed, talked out, with a brain that is, as she apologetically puts it, "fried." Two weeks into promoting her first novel "The Namesake," the 35-year-old author is in that peculiar Twilight Zone known as the national book tour, a whirlwind of readings, interviews, airplanes and takeout food. Although she's brought her husband and their 16-month-old son on the road with her, she's not getting much time to see them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010
The Cost of Living Early and Uncollected Stories Mavis Gallant Introduction by Jhumpa Lahiri NYRB Classics: 368 pp., $16.95 paper
BOOKS
September 7, 2003 | Heller McAlpin, Heller McAlpin writes regularly for Book Review, among other publications.
What's in a name? That's the question Jhumpa Lahiri explores -- somewhat doggedly -- in her first novel, "The Namesake." Lahiri made a reputation for herself in 1999, at 32, when she published "Interpreter of Maladies," a luminous collection of stories about first-generation Americans attempting to bridge the disorienting, often baffling cultural gaps between their native India and their adopted country. The book ultimately won the PEN/Hemingway Award as well as the Pulitzer Prize.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|