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Jia Zhangke

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Although no one knows if former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping did say "To get rich is glorious," that sentiment has certainly taken hold in China. But what happens to a society when an unregulated drive for personal wealth upends traditional norms? What happens to the less fortunate when people who have money come to believe that nothing else matters? "A Touch of Sin," the powerful if uneven new film by highly regarded Chinese director Jia Zhangke, is a corrosive depiction of the New China, an everything-for-sale society still figuring out how to cope with the dehumanizing effects of unbridled capitalism.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
It would be easy for Feng Xiaogang to rest on his laurels. After all, the Chinese film director has churned out a string of wildly popular comedies, made China's first Imax movie, "Aftershock," and is now in the Oscar hunt for the second time with the drama "Back to 1942," which received a limited release in the U.S. a year ago. A real-life story of war and famine that killed millions, it is the country's entry for 2014's best foreign film. ("Aftershock" was China's selection three years ago.)
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Drafthouse Films announced Friday that it has acquired North American rights to the film "Borgman," which recently premiered at the Cannes Film Festival. The film was the first from the Netherlands to play in the Main Competition at the festival in nearly 40 years. Drafthouse plans both a theatrical and VOD/digital release in the U.S. sometime in 2014. Written and directed by Alex van Warmerdam, the film crafts an allegory on the nature of evil with its story of a vagrant (Jan Bijvoet)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Chinese filmmaker Jia Zhangke's "Unknown Pleasures," "The World" and "24 City" have been celebrated by critics and on the international festival circuit, but his work has yet to break through with a wider audience in America. That might change with his latest, "A Touch of Sin," an action film of sorts set in contemporary China and opening Friday in Los Angeles. Where Jia's earlier works have often blended fiction with documentary, here he overlays the style of traditional martial arts adventure storytelling known as wuxia onto his contemporary four-part tale of loners, revenge and violence based on recent real-life incidents in China.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Chinese authorities said Wednesday they would relax some restrictions on film, TV and radio productions, though the immediate impact of the changes was unclear and several prominent movie directors said they did not believe the reforms were game-changers. Chinese filmmakers will now be allowed to shoot “ordinary content” movies after only submitting a synopsis to censors rather than a full script, according to an announcement from the State Council, China's cabinet.  But the finished products will still have to be screened for censors before they are approved to be played in theaters.
WORLD
July 25, 2009 | Joshua Frank and Barbara Demick
China's ethnic tensions have spilled into Australia, where all Chinese films scheduled for the Melbourne Film Festival have been pulled to protest the inclusion of a documentary about Uighur leader Rebiya Kadeer. The films were withdrawn by their directors on the eve of the festival's opening Friday after organizers turned down the Chinese government's request that they cancel the screening of "The 10 Conditions of Love," an Australian-made documentary about Kadeer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
It would be easy for Feng Xiaogang to rest on his laurels. After all, the Chinese film director has churned out a string of wildly popular comedies, made China's first Imax movie, "Aftershock," and is now in the Oscar hunt for the second time with the drama "Back to 1942," which received a limited release in the U.S. a year ago. A real-life story of war and famine that killed millions, it is the country's entry for 2014's best foreign film. ("Aftershock" was China's selection three years ago.)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Chinese filmmaker Jia Zhangke's "A Touch of Sin," which debuted at the Cannes Film Festival last week, will be coming to U.S. screens in late fall or early winter. The New York-based company Kino Lorber announced Tuesday that it had picked up the U.S. rights to the movie. The film is Jia's fourth to play at the festival and is divided into four stories. L.A. Times critic Kenneth Turan called the film "a corrosive depiction of the New China, an everything-for-sale society still figuring out how to cope with the dehumanizing effects of unbridled capitalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Chinese filmmaker Jia Zhangke's "Unknown Pleasures," "The World" and "24 City" have been celebrated by critics and on the international festival circuit, but his work has yet to break through with a wider audience in America. That might change with his latest, "A Touch of Sin," an action film of sorts set in contemporary China and opening Friday in Los Angeles. Where Jia's earlier works have often blended fiction with documentary, here he overlays the style of traditional martial arts adventure storytelling known as wuxia onto his contemporary four-part tale of loners, revenge and violence based on recent real-life incidents in China.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2013 | By Dennis Lim
CANNES, France - "A Touch of Sin," an early critical favorite among the films in the official competition at the Cannes Film Festival this year, has been widely greeted as signifying a new direction for the Chinese filmmaker Jia Zhangke. The claim is only partly true. A martial arts movie of sorts, this is the first genre picture by Jia, 43, known for such contemplative dramas and documentaries as "Still Life" (2006) and "24 City" (2008), which reveal how the forces of modernization and globalization have affected individual lives in 21st century China.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Although no one knows if former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping did say "To get rich is glorious," that sentiment has certainly taken hold in China. But what happens to a society when an unregulated drive for personal wealth upends traditional norms? What happens to the less fortunate when people who have money come to believe that nothing else matters? "A Touch of Sin," the powerful if uneven new film by highly regarded Chinese director Jia Zhangke, is a corrosive depiction of the New China, an everything-for-sale society still figuring out how to cope with the dehumanizing effects of unbridled capitalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- Chinese authorities said Wednesday they would relax some restrictions on film, TV and radio productions, though the immediate impact of the changes was unclear and several prominent movie directors said they did not believe the reforms were game-changers. Chinese filmmakers will now be allowed to shoot “ordinary content” movies after only submitting a synopsis to censors rather than a full script, according to an announcement from the State Council, China's cabinet.  But the finished products will still have to be screened for censors before they are approved to be played in theaters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Drafthouse Films announced Friday that it has acquired North American rights to the film "Borgman," which recently premiered at the Cannes Film Festival. The film was the first from the Netherlands to play in the Main Competition at the festival in nearly 40 years. Drafthouse plans both a theatrical and VOD/digital release in the U.S. sometime in 2014. Written and directed by Alex van Warmerdam, the film crafts an allegory on the nature of evil with its story of a vagrant (Jan Bijvoet)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2013 | By Dennis Lim
CANNES, France - "A Touch of Sin," an early critical favorite among the films in the official competition at the Cannes Film Festival this year, has been widely greeted as signifying a new direction for the Chinese filmmaker Jia Zhangke. The claim is only partly true. A martial arts movie of sorts, this is the first genre picture by Jia, 43, known for such contemplative dramas and documentaries as "Still Life" (2006) and "24 City" (2008), which reveal how the forces of modernization and globalization have affected individual lives in 21st century China.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Chinese filmmaker Jia Zhangke's "A Touch of Sin," which debuted at the Cannes Film Festival last week, will be coming to U.S. screens in late fall or early winter. The New York-based company Kino Lorber announced Tuesday that it had picked up the U.S. rights to the movie. The film is Jia's fourth to play at the festival and is divided into four stories. L.A. Times critic Kenneth Turan called the film "a corrosive depiction of the New China, an everything-for-sale society still figuring out how to cope with the dehumanizing effects of unbridled capitalism.
WORLD
July 25, 2009 | Joshua Frank and Barbara Demick
China's ethnic tensions have spilled into Australia, where all Chinese films scheduled for the Melbourne Film Festival have been pulled to protest the inclusion of a documentary about Uighur leader Rebiya Kadeer. The films were withdrawn by their directors on the eve of the festival's opening Friday after organizers turned down the Chinese government's request that they cancel the screening of "The 10 Conditions of Love," an Australian-made documentary about Kadeer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The French lesbian love story “Blue Is the Warmest Color” won the Palme d'Or at the Festival de Cannes. In an unprecedented step, jury president Steven Spielberg announced that the prize had been given not only to director Abdellatiff Kechiche but to costars Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seydoux as well. The film, which French critics adored but the foreign contingent had mixed feelings about, got a rapturous reception from the Palais de Festival crowd, and both actresses were in tears by the time they reached the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2005 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
UNHURRIED and quietly bold, adroitly balancing a personal and a geopolitical agenda in its exploration of the human stories behind the hustle and flow of the Chinese economic miracle, "The World" has a lot to say and is not in any unholy rush to say it. Written and directed by China's Jia Zhangke, it joins the aesthetic deliberateness so much in vogue in Asian cinema with a more traditional concern with character and a surprising willingness to question his country's status quo.
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